Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina state ports"



NORTH CAROLS SWf ug 
RAUIGH 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/northcarolinasta1970nort 



iTBTE PORTS 



Spring, 1967 





\ 

(ttnaatal 3^ 
HtBtnralanJi % \ 
Jfartlj Qkrnltna 





" 



SiiiW''^ 



" VftM, 






'., C « 



■•JIMi" 




North 
Carolina 

Our state's getting to be a big name in international trade, 
and it takes a big bank to keep up. A bank big enough and 
experienced enough to offer North Carolina business and 
industry direct banking and commercial connections 
throughout the world. Backed by total resources of more 
than $825 million and capital funds over $55 million, 
NCNB's International Department serves exporters and 
importers through letters of credit, acceptance financing, 
foreign collections, foreign exchange and remittance of 
funds. Whatever it takes, we're doing our best to meet the 
demands of this fast-moving state. And well we should. 
After all, it's part of our name. 

National 
Bank 

Offices in Burlington, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, North Wilkesboro, Raleigh, Research Triangle, Statesville, Tarboro, Tryon, Wilmington and Winston-Salem 



J_ 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad - —.24 

Brunswick County 17 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County _ 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. - 1 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First Citizens Bank _ - .....22 

Glasgow Hicks Co. _ 24 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach 24 

Heide Company, Inc. Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. 1 _ Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc 23 

New Hanover County 17 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co 16 

North Carolina National Bank .. Inside Front Cover 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 1 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. .23 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 17 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc _ 23 




U/vnUJ 



Big tonnage is our "cup of tea." For help 
on any movement to, from or within the 
South, remember to call one of our Sales 
Representatives. Then lean back and let 
him take over. 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

'SOUTHERNS ACCENT IS ON YOU!" 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



l\Tf] W.TH 
CARTERET 




• • • 




. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 



Charles Piner & Teen Piner 
Operators 



PA 6-5440 




General Assembly of North Carolina, housed in its own building, is the only state legislative body to have its own 
facility. Here is the Senate. 



General 

Assembly 

Gathers 



in 



Raleigh 



The General Assembly of North 
Carolina meets in the State Capitol 
every two years. They generally 
stay in session about five months. 

Part of their deliberations are 
principally concerned with a bal- 
anced budget. This budget must al- 
ways be without deficit, since deficit 
financing of state operations is un- 
constitutional in North Carolina. 

The Appropriations Committee 
of the General Assembly recom- 
mends the budget in the Appropri- 
ations Bill. This year the North 
Carolina State Ports Authority has 
asked for $6,140,000. This request 
is based upon $2,900,000 for a dock 
extension of 900 feet at Wilming- 
ton and one 75-ton gantry crane, 
with an additional warehouse and 
two gantry cranes at Morehead 
City. 



The request also calls for a ware- 
house and transit shed at Wilming- 
ton. The Ports Authority has based 
its request upon careful study of 
present conditions which produce 
congestion and a shortage of stor- 
age space required by the North 
Carolina industries, who are prin- 
cipal customers. 

The North Carolina State Ports 
at Wilmington and Morehead City 
are primarily designed to serve the 
industrial and commercial commu- 
nity of North Carolina. This in- 
cludes the entire state. Industry of 
the piedmont and the west actually 
profits most from the activities of 
the North Carolina State Ports. 
This request, for capital improve- 
ments, is a request for investment 
in East-West transportation. 



This is the House of Representatives of the North Carolina General Assembly. It is interesting to note that 
the General Assembly meets once every two years. 




«fH 



f^^Lk **AwfciM... 



jUS*** 




AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORCE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby. V. Chairman 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



SPRINC ISSUE, 1967, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 13, NO. I 



R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 

S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

RAY MATH IS, Representative 






H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



CONTENTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDRICHS, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



Page 

General Assembly in Raleigh 2 

Travel Council of North Carolina 4 

North Carolina World Trade 6 

General News 8 

Greensboro Lumber Industry 10 

Cartoon Story 12 

Down Historyland Trail 14 

Motor Carriers 16 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 



STATE PORTS 




COVER STORY 

The cover story in this issue is re- 
lated to two articles in the body of 
the magazine; "Down the Historyland 
Trail," Page 12 and 13 and "North 
Carolina Coastal Historyland," Page 
5. The cover shows five scenes from 
the guide map and brochure called 
"Coastal Historyland North Carolina". 
Each one of these scenes is located 
near a historic or modern port of 
North Carolina. 




In January the Travel Council of North Carolina, 
led by President W. Glenn Humphrey of Raleigh, went 
on a travel mission to Florida. Honored guest and 
principal speaker for the mission was Mrs. Dan Moore, 
wife of the Governor. She was accompanied by her 
secretary, Mrs. Caroline Gardiner, and Bill F. Hens- 
ley, of the Travel Information and Promotion Division 
of C & D. Mr. Hensley, also a member of the Travel 
Council, was a member of the special committee which 
organized the trip. The committee was — L. C. Bruce 
of Raleigh, Chairman; Doris Potter, newly elected 
President of the Travel Council; Hensley; T. E. 
Pickard, Executive Vice-President, Carolina Motor 
Club; Hugh Morton of Wilmington, and owner of 
Grandfather Mountain; and Glenn Humphrey, Ex- 
Officio. 

The Travel Council visited Brunswick, Georgia, 
which is a port city near Jekyll Island; Gainesville; 
Orlando; Tampa, another port city; Sarasota; West 
Palm Beach, another port city; Fort Lauderdale and 
Port Everglades ; Daytona, St. Augustine ; and the 
port city of Jacksonville. During the tour a slide 
series prepared especially by Hugh Morton in co- 
operation with the C & D Travel Division, was shown 
to many groups of people prominent in the travel 
and public relations industry of the state. 

On the return to North Carolina, with the cooper- 
ation of the North Carolina Association of Broad- 
casters, a state-wide radio TV network was arranged 
and Mrs. Moore gave the same wonderful talk about 
North Carolina that received a tremendous ovation 
in Orlando. 



North Carolina 
Travel Council 
Sells Floridians 



Glenn Humphrey of Raleigh, president of the Travel Council during 
the Florida mission, presents gifts to the mayor of St. Augustine. 




Left to right, Mrs. Roland Potter of North Wilkesboro, new president 
of the Travel Council, Dick Pope, Cypress Gardens. Mrs. Dan Moore, 
Wade Brown, Mayor of Boone. 



Nortlj (ttarnlma fllnastal Btatnrglani 



In Raleigh, North Carolina, after the end of three 
hard-working and fruitful years as President of the 
North Carolina Coastal Historyland Association, P. D. 
Midgett, Jr., of Englehard, former Senator in the 
General Assembly and "Booster for North Carolina 
Extraordinary," turned over the gavel as President 
of the Coastal Historyland Association to Glenn 
Tucker, of Carolina Beach. 

Midgett was immediately, at the suggestion of the 
Nominating Committee, made Director, and he was 
the first Director named as immediate Past President. 

Coastal Historyland Association is an organization 
composed of interested volunteer workers from 35 
counties east of the Interstate 95 Highway, which 
bisects the Coastal Plain portion of North Carolina. 

In the past three years, under the leadership of 
Midgett, the people of the area have received wide- 
range publicity and promotion, through the North 
Carolina Association of Broadcasters, the North Caro- 
lina Press Association, and their members. 

With the help of Archives and History, the De- 
partment of C & D's Travel Promotion and Infor- 



mation Section, and many others too numerous to 
mention a beautiful guide map and brochure combi- 
nation was published on fine quality paper with a 
very attractive outer fold. 

Some 75,000 copies of these will have been distri- 
buted in eleven states by the end of this fiscal year. 
In addition to that, 57 radio stations have carried 
spot broadcasts, and 96 more radio stations are 
about to begin these spot broadcasts urging North 
Carolinians to travel, and to travel in Coastal 
Historyland. A set of slides which the North Caro- 
lina Travel Council (see page 4) carried with them 
on their travel promotion tour of Florida have been 
shown on prominent television stations in North 
Carolina. These slides contain a great deal of 
information and many beautiful photographs of 
coastal Historyland. 

All this and more has resulted from the kind, con- 
siderate, patient, and persistent effort of leadership 
put forth by P. D. Midgett, Jr., of Hyde County, who 
served during the formative years of Coastal His- 
toryland Association. 




L. to R— P. D. Midgett, Jr., Bob EUett, Mrs. Lucille Winslow, Alonzo Edwards, John Crawford. Glenn Tucker.— Insert— P. D. Midgett. Jr. 




MOORE 



REMARKS BY GOVERNOR DAN K. MOORE 
OPENING OF NEW PLANT OF MORGANITE, INC. 

April 19, 1967— Dunn, N. C. 

Our State ports at Wilmington and Morehead City serve 
companies such as Morganite. These ports are expanding 
to better serve North Carolina based firms that import 
materials or export products. Our highways and railroad 
system put facilities in this State close to the major 
population centers of the United States. All of these factors 
are important to industrial development in North Carolina. 

AND AT 

QUARTERLY MEETING OF THE 
BOARD OF CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT 

April 16, 1967— Goldsboro, N. C. 

Our State Port facilities at Wilmington and Morehead 
City are constantly growing to meet the needs of the State. 
A $4.5 million construction program was completed at the 
Wilmington facility last year and a $k-5 million program is 
now under way at Morehead City. In addition, work has 
begun on the $11.5 million phosphate handling facility at 
Morehead City. And, the State Ports Authority has re- 
quested more funds for construction. 




SCOTT 



In Charlotte in 1965 at a World Trade Association 
Meeting, Lt. Governor Robert Scott, representing Gov- 
ernor Dan K. Moore, made this statement to World 
Trade Association members and their guests from 
countries all over the world who trade with North 
Carolina. 

"First, I would like to pay tribute to the North Caro- 
lina World Trade Association. This group is composed 
of North Carolina businessmen who are engaged in 
both export and import trade. These businessmen work 
together to solve the problems involved in interna- 
tional trade, and they have a fine and commendable 
record of assisting in the development of World Trade. 

I am sure that the emphasis provided by NCWTA 
activities will make a significant contribution to the 
promotion of a continuing awareness of the importance 
of World Trade to our economy and our relations with 
other nations. 

I was very impressed with the theme — "Peace for 
Trade" — "Trade for Peace." In the past when con- 
sidering world trade, too often we have tended to think 
only in terms of the direct effect of trade on our own 
economy. We have, I am afraid, too often failed to 
appreciate the role world trade can play in promoting 
and maintaining world peace. We have at times over- 
looked the great potential of world trade as an instru- 
ment to achieve greater understanding and coopera- 
tion among the people of all nations." 





Paul E. Pauly 

Dir. International Trade 

Promotion, Bureau 
International Commerce, 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 



,96! MWM- * 11HG 



J. Russell Mudge 
Gen. Mgr. Far East Division 
General Electric Company 
New York, New York 








L E . Moody. BAW 



On April 20, at the famous Sedgefield Inn and 
Manor House, the North Carolina World Trade As- 
sociation held its 1967 annual meeting. Elected to 
the Board of Directors to replace the outgoing Di- 
rectors were: 

C. R. Harris, Charlotte; Edgar Kirk, Raleigh; H. 
Banks Newman, Winston-Salem; Richard Barker, 
Wilmington; Oliver Moore, Raleigh. 

Officers elected were: 

Leon Moody was re-elected President. He is Vice 
President and General Manager of BASF, Charlotte. 

Edgar Kirk 1st Vice President, Raleigh; Richard 
Barker, 2nd Vice President, Wilmington; A. C. 
Brown, Secretary and Treasurer, Charlotte. C. R. 
Harris was re-elected Chairman of Executive Com- 
mittee. 

Honored as Honorary Members were Walter Kelly 
of Southern Pines, former exporter and world trade 
executive, now retired and living in Southern Pines. 
Kelly has been a very important wheel in the ma- 
chinery of progress which has surged North Caro- 
lina from 15th to ltlh in world trade among the 
states of the United States. 

John Mercer Reeves, former Chairman of the 
Ports Authority who bowed out in 1966, also has 
been a bulwark in the tremendous growth of world 
trade in North Carolina. Previous biographical ac- 
complishments of Mr. Reeves have been in these 
pages. Suffice it to say that the North Carolina Ports 
Magazine once again is honored to have these gentle- 
men on its pages. 



©^ 






C. R. Harris, President 
Pheumafil Corporation 
Charlotte, N. C. 



John Mercer Reeves 
Pinehurst, N. C. 
Chairman of Board, 
Reeves Brothers Co. 



Walter Kelly 
Southern Pines, N. C. 
Retired 



Also at the meeting of the World Trade Associ- 
ation C. R. Harris received the annual award given to 
that North Carolinian who does, in the opinion of 
the committee, a tremendous job of promoting world 
trade for North Carolina. C. R. Harris being the 
first recipient of the award, it will be called the 
World Trade Association C. R. Harris Award. 




James W. Davis Receives 
"Golden Eagle" Award 



James W. Davis, (left), executive director, North 
Carolina State Ports, is shown as he received the an- 
nual First National Bank of Eastern North Carolina's 
"Golden Eagle" award presented by the bank's presi- 
dent Mitchell F. Allen, Jr. The award, presented for 
outstanding public service, was given during a dinner 
honoring the recipient at the Cape Fear Country 
Club, Wilmington, (March 16). Davis was appointed 
state ports director in December, 1962, and has 
supervised the many improvements which have been 
made in the last few years in the continuing progress 
of the state ports facilities. 



PORTS AUTHORITY meets in Morehead City 



Ports Authority held its regular meeting in More- 
head City at the State Ports Terminal Office on March 
20. Principal news to come out of this meeting was 
the planning of a Central Ports Office Building for 
Morehead City. Similar to the North Carolina Mari- 
time Building in Wilmington which was dedicated 
in 1965. 

This building will be designed to have its space 
doubled as the Port Terminal continues to grow. Space 
will be provided for Port-related enterprises, and the 
investment will be amortized by an annual rental from 
these enterprises. 



The Chairman and the Authority were informed 
that a feasibility study planned for Fayetteville is 
now under way. The study is being financed jointly 
by EDA of the U. S. Department of Commerce, the 
Ports Authority, the City of Fayetteville, and the 
Chamber of Commerce of Greater Fayetteville. The 
study is to judge the feasibility of the construction 
of a barge terminal on the Cape Fear on property 
which the Ports Authority now holds for that purpose. 

The Authority passed a resolution to try to get the 
appropriation for the construction of sea jetties in 
Beaufort Inlet and to assist other agencies and organi- 
zations to work for improvement of the harbor. 




Ben Moore, WNBE-TV, New Bern 

"Here is an action photo of a TV announcer and Emcee. From 
the looks of things he is most versatile. Recently on his hour 
show, which comes on at 7:00 o'clock in the morning, the slide 
series being used by the Travel Council of North Carolina was 
shown to the early risers in the New Bern-Morehead City area. 
The Ports Authority will be featured in a similar program in 
May." 



American Artos 

Textile Firm to 

Add Assembly Plant 

in Charlotte 

American Artos Corp., which opened, offices in 
Charlotte in mid-1964, will build a parts assembly and 
manufacturing plant here. 

A 33,000 square-foot structure will be built at the 
junction of 1-85 and U.S. 21, north of Charlotte. It 
represents a major expansion for the American repre- 
sentative of Artos Maschinenbau of Hamburg, Ger- 
many, a textile machinery manufacturer. 

Construction should begin by the summer, Frita K. 
Witt, the corporation's service engineer, said last 
week. Completion is scheduled for the end of 1967. 

Artos Maschinenbau of Hamburg exports about 75 
per cent of its production. 

American Artos sells heat setting tenter frames 
and wet finishing equipment (washing and dyeing 
machinery) to textile mills in this country. 

Mohican Mills in Lincolnton purchased one of the 
world's largest tenter frames from the corporation. 
It arrived Jan. 24 and was the largest single piece of 
textile machinery imported through the port of 
Wilmington, N. C. 

It arrived in 27 large crates. 

The 120-foot long machine can handle a cloth bolt 
more than 23 feet wide. 

The frame can process 50 miles of fabric daily, an 
amount sufficient to produce about 200,000 men's 
shirts. 

The parent German company, which employs 1,500 
people, has sold its products in this country for 6 
or 8 years, Witt said. It was previously represented 
by special arrangements with American textile 
manufacturers. 

The company does considerable business in the 
Carolinas and Alabama, although it has some ac- 
counts in the New England area. — excerpt from 
Charlotte Observer February 5, 1967. 




TEXTILE MACHINE— Jack Davis of the N. C. 
State Ports examines part of a textile machine said 
to be the largest ever imported through the Wilming- 
ton State Ports facility. It was transported to the 
United States from Germany aboard the Finn Arrow. 
The machine will be used in the manufacture of 
women's clothing. It was imported in 27 parts. Hans 
O. Keilhack, sales manager for the Artos Maschinen- 
bau Company of Hamburg, Germany, which exported 
the machine, said it was perhaps the largest of its 
type in the world. Keilhack said the value of the 
machine was over $250,000. It will be sent to the 
American Artos Corporation in Lincoln, N. C. When 
assembled, the machine will be 100 feet long and 23 
and one half feet wide. (SECO Photo) reprinted from 
Wilmington Star. 




Will Rowland, son of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Rowland of Kinston. 
N. C, is shown with a 40-inch metal profile of the Confederate ram 
"Neuse" which is now on a 'round the world cruise aboard the Nor- 
wegian cargo-passenger ship, Wilhelmser Line "Toreador." 

She is due back in Wilmington May 14, 1967. 



Norwood Cheek is the energetic 
and likeable International Trade 
Specialist, and hard worker in the 
Field Office of the U. S. Department 
of Commerce. His principal busi- 
ness interests are in International 
Trade, however, he has also found 
time for a wonderful family in 
Leaksville. N. C. Latest addition is 
a young son born right after Christmas. "NORTH 
CAROLINA STATE PORTS" join his many friends 
in congratulations. The baby weighed 9 1 2 lbs. and he 
is called "Chip" by his three beautiful sisters. 




Greensboro Lumber Industry 
Uses North Carolina Ports 



The McCoy Lumber Industries was organized in 
June, 1961, by H. V. McCoy, with home offices in 
Ardmore, Pennsylvania, and a branch sales office in 
Greensboro, North Carolina. The concept of the cor- 
poration was for the purpose of buying and selling 
West Coast products to the retail dealer trade, with 
the West Coast cargo being handled through ports in 
the north in the Camden and Philadelphia area. 

The first fiscal year's operation's sales volume 
totaled over $3 million. 

In 1962 the home office was moved to Greensboro, 
with sales offices maintained in Philadelphia. In 
1963 a wholesale Hardwood Division was opened. 
This was also successful, and in 1965 the company 
acquired a North Carolina firm in Spring Hope. 
This was a manufacturing plant concerned with 
Yellow Pine and Southern Hardwoods. 

By the end of fiscal year 1966 sales totaled $10 
million. In December of that year the company 
purchased its first cargo to be received through 



the Port of Wilmington. North Carolina. This cargo 
2,400,000 gross board feet, is the first of its kind to 
enter through this Port Terminal for the exclusive 
distribution in the Carolinas. Completely packaged, 
lengths and widths separated, it arrived at the Port 
of Wilmington on April 19 aboard the "SS Tiha." 

Regular shipments are expected from Vancouver, 
B. C. to Wilmington every quarter, and each shipment 
will be approximately 3 millon gross board feet. The 
cargo will be moved by rail and truck to retail dealers 
throughout North Carolina, such as the Bingham Lum- 
ber Company, Winston-Salem, N. C. ; Bingham & 
Parks Lumber Company, Advance, N. C. ; Buchan Sup- 
ply Company, North Wilkesboro, N. C. ; West Coast 
Lumber Company, Wilmington, N. C. ; Guy C. Lee 
Manufacturing Company, Smithfield, N. C. ; and 
Coman Lumber Company, Durham, N. C. 

The story unfolding here is another example of how 
the State Port Terminals by their presence and their 
capability enhance the economy of North Carolina. 



This is the SS TIHA unloading 2,387,000 gross board feet of lumber for the McCoy Lumber Industries, Inc., Greensboro, N. C. at the N. C. 
State Port Terminals at Wilmington, N. C. 




10 




L. to R. — Thad Bingham — Bingham Lumber Company, Winston Salem, N. C.J Max Bingham 
— Bingham Lumber Company, Gold Hill, N. C.J Donald Bingham — Bingham Lumber Com- 
pany, Advance, N. C.J Bill Cothren — Lowes of Wilmington, Wilmington, N. C.J Charles 
Brown — West Coast Lumber Co., Wilmington, N. C.J Ross Lampe — Guy C. Lee Manu- 
facturing Co., Smithfield, N. C.J Clyde Lennon — Lowe's of Wilmington, Wilmington, N. C. 



Captain Grgic, Master of SS TIHA; Hal McCoy— McCoy 
Lumber Company; Walter Friederichs — Operations Man- 
ager, N. C. State Ports Authority, Wilmington, N. C. 




i 



The remarkable growth of the North Carolina State 
Port Terminals created in 1945 under Governor Gregg 
Cherry; became operational in 1952 under Governor 
Kerr Scott ; and reorganized in 1957 under Governor 
Luther Hodges ; adopted long range plans under Gov- 
ernor Terry Sanford. These plans go forward under 
Governor Dan Moore. 

While this progress was going on, increases in 
World Trade throughout North Carolina was astound- 
ing. No matter which came first — the chicken or the 
egg _the fact remains that the rise of North Carolina 
from 15th to 11th among the states in total world 
trade value paralleled the phenomenal growth of the 
North Carolina State Ports. 

Moving from the planning stages in 1949 to the 
year 1967 with a total of over one million tons 
handled; 829 ships, 25,000 tractor-trailer units, and 
over 8,000 railroad cars. 

With increased activity, the indications are that 
the port terminals will be handling over three million 
tons by 1970 and, of course, all the other figures should 
increase proportionately. 

The $6,140,000 requested of the Advisory Budget 
Commission, in August, therefore, becomes vitally 
necessary to keep up with this continuing progress. 
Traffic, when congested around the docks, becomes in- 
creasingly expensive to handle; service is mollified, 
and the ability to keep up with progress is slowed 
down. 




1945 



1952 
4400,000,000 



1957 




1961 

4700,000,000 



1965 
4 7, 000,000,000 
TOTAL WORLD TRADE M C 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



*\ 



Written by Elizabeth W. Wilborn, 
member of the Staff of the State 
Department of Archives and His- 
tory. 



BRUNSWICK: 

TOWN ON THE LOWER CAPE FEAR 



The port of Brunswick is no 
longer open to the "Freemason" 
the "Arthur and Polly" the "Three 
Marys" or the "Two Brothers." It 
has been closed for more than a 
hundred and seventy-five years. The 
Public House and other business 
establishments of the once thriving 
town have vanished. Only the 
foundations remain. 

But Brunswick Town is not dead ! 
People are bustling about the house 
foundations built before the Revo- 
lutionary War and the great earth- 
works constructed during the War 
Between the States. No "General 
Cargo" is entered into the port 
records, no regular services are 
held in St. Philips Church, nor is 
the boom of cannon heard, yet hun- 
dreds throng the sand soil of this 
Lower Cape Fear town. 

Through trained archaeologists, 
many house and building founda- 
tions have been uncovered ; glisten- 
ing among the trees is a new Visi- 



tor Center-Museum which tells the 
story of Brunswick in exhibits filled 
with fascinating artifacts. Pause 
for a moment by the display deal- 
ing with the political life of the 
Colonial town. Here in 1765 and 
1766 armed citizens resisted the 
hated Stamp Act with violence. 
This use of arms against the Bri- 
tish authorities is one of the ear- 
liest incidents of resistance to the 
Crown in America. 

Pause to read some of the letters 
written in 1865 from Fort Ander- 
son which was built across a por- 
tion of Colonial Brunswick. The 
soldiers' letters might have been 
written during any war: 

"... I slept in the Stables last 
night & the night before. ... I 
keep my horse saddled day and 
night. . . ." 

"Two thirds of the army are 
now buoyant with the expecta- 
tions of an early peace, should 
our commissioners fail to effect 




Conjectual drawing by Don Mayhew of the appearance of the eighteenth-century 
House-Tailor Shop" at Brunswick Town. 



'Publick 



a treaty and return without 
some tidings of a reconcilation 
the relapse will be too much 
for the army to bear — better a 
thousand times peace had not 
been mentioned — but let us 
hope and pray that something 
may be done to mitigate the 
feelings of discord. . . ." 
Man's age-old cry against the 
futility of war is heartbreakingly 
evident in the above which was 
written February 4, 1865. In an- 
other letter the reader can visua- 
lize the trials of a soldier: 
"I returned from my Bruns- 
wick expedition two days since, 
rather worsted — I started with 
diarrhoea, and returned with 
Neuralgia in the head, sore 
throat — new place- — sores on 
hand — same old place — & two 
boils, where my body impinged 
on the saddle. I am feeling 
pretty well today however." 
There are poignant letters from 
young fathers, who plead with their 
children to "Mind your Mother" 
and to "Be good children in Meet- 
ing & Sabbath School." 

The records for the port of 
Brunswick reveal interesting de- 
tails about some of the North Caro- 
linians who were shipowners and 
merchants. John Burgwin is listed 
three times on one page as the 
owner of the brig "William" built 
in Massachusetts Bay in 1772 and 
registered in Boston on October 28 
of the same year. He also owned 
the sloop "Experiment" built in 
North Carolina and registered at 
Brunswick on January 2, 1773. 
The "Phila. Pack," a sloop, was 
built in North Carolina and regis- 
tered at Brunswick on April 29, 
1774. What did these and other 
vessels carry besides the "tar, 
pitch, and turpentine" for which 
North Carolina was noted? Rum, 
cordials, potatoes, salt, flour — 
everyday necessities — and luxuries 
for those who could afford them. 
Two crates of earthenware, 3,000 
bricks, one box of glass, three boxes 
of paper, and 3,724 yards of Irish 
bounty linen are itemized in one 
entry. Nutmeg and other spices, tea 
and chocolate, wearing apparel, 
gunpowder, "78 passengers" and 
"8 negroes" are listed with "3 
Horses" and "2 M feet Mahogany." 
Cargo was merely cargo to the mas- 
ters of the brigs, sloops, snows, and 
schooners which picked up and de- 
livered cargoes to and from New 
York, St. Croix, Jamaica, Liver- 



14 




Archaeologist Stanley A. South examines the ruin of Judge Maurice Moore's smokehouse, built 
during the 1760's at Brunswick Town. 



pool, Hispaniola, Philadelphia, 
Salem, Hull, Charles Towne, An 
tiqua, and St. Augustine. How of- 
ten in the port entries are found 
such items as "12 casks Rum — 
Ballast," "33 Hhds. Rum— Ballast." 

The growth of the port of Wil- 
mington was a contributing factor 
in the decline of Brunswick as a 
shipping center. The British burn- 
ed part of Brunswick Town during 
the Revolution, and for one brief 
period it was invaded and seized 
by the Spanish. It was also exposed 
to hurricanes and other weather 
hazards. 

No more tantalizing story — an- 
other of North Carolina's mysteries 
— can be found than that of two 
attempts to settle the Lower Cape 
Fear. One effort was made from 
the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 
1662/3. A number of persons left 
the Charles Towne and Boston area 
and came to the "Cape Fear" re- 



gion. They brought with them 
goods and provisions. Why were 
they unable to establish a colony? 
They later agreed to pay Richard 
Price, master of the "Plyer" to 
take them to Roanoke. If they were 
unable to disembark there "where 
the English doe Inhabite" the party 
agreed to continue to Boston for 
additional fare. 

These settlers as well as others 
from the Barbadoes did not remain 
long at the mouth of what one ex- 
plorer called the "River Jordan." 
Was this because Cape Faire really 
was Cape Fear? 

In 1725 Maurice Moore was 
granted the land on which the town 
of Brunswick was to be situated. 
Town lots were sold as early as 
1726 and during the 1730's this 
thriving town was the county seat 
of New Hanover County. When 
Brunswick County was established 
in 1764, Brunswick became the seat 
of the new county. 




During the War of Jenkin's Ear 
(King George's War) in 1748 
Brunswick Town was captured by 
the Spanish who held it for three 
days. When the townspeople re- 
captured Brunswick one of the 
Spanish ships was blown up, but 
the people sold the goods and slaves 
that were taken from the ship to 
help build St. Philips Church. 

Members of the Sprunt family, 
whose beautiful home, Orton Plan- 
tation, is famous for its azalea 
gardens, helped the Society of 
Colonial Dames maintain the ruins 
of St. Philips. Early excavation of 
streets and house ruins was con- 
ducted by E. Lawrence Lee and 
continued under Stanley A. South 
and George Demmy, archaeologists 
with the State Department of Ar- 
chives and History. 

A French coin, dated 1696, was 
found in the ruin of Judge Maurice 
Moore's (son of the founder; 
house. Here, too, were found Jew's 
harps, probably used by Alfred 
Moore as a boy. 

Spanish coins of silver have been 
fastened together to make cuff- 
links. This same type of coin was 
often cut or "shaved" to make 
change — from this custom comes 
the expression "two-bits," meaning 
a quarter, since a quarter of a 
Spanish piece of eight was "two 
bits." 

The Visitor Center - Museum 
opened April 23, 1967, at Bruns- 
wick Town State Historic Site. 
Visit the site for a day filled with 
surprises : The massive walls of St. 
Philips Church where Royal Gov- 
ernor Arthur Dobbs was buried by 
his young wife Justina will im- 
press you ; the guided tour by cos- 
tumed guide William Reaves is an 
experience unique to Brunswick: 
talks with William Faulk, Historic 
Site Assistant, or with archaeol- 
ogists South and Demmy will en- 
rich your knowledge of Colonial 
living. 

Don't forget to look for the tiny 
doll and child's brass candlestick 
found in the ruins of Russell- 
borough — home of Royal Governors 
Dobbs and William Tryon. There 
is a "clutch" of eggs buried before 
the Revolution, with the home of 
baby chicks still showing. There 
are buttons and shoe buckles and 
cufflinks fine enough for the grand- 
est of balls. There is too much to 
tell; go see for yourself the fab- 
ulous town of Brunswick on the 
Cape Fear! 



15 



STATUS OF SMALL TWIN TRAILERS 





\ ALASKA \ 




"i ^ 


y/^<\ 




..s**^^ 


J%? 


^ 
V 





^ 



t\, 







'•"ST" 



»'*f~ -__ 



I '.I 







I I Small Twin -Trailers of 65' permitted. 

1 1 11 Small Twin -Trailers of over 65' permitted on desisnated toll roads. 

1 J Small Twin -Trailers not permitted on resular roads. 

| D | Desienated Hishways Only. 




Dual Trailer Operations 



The trend for containerized cargo for ocean shipping 
has swept over the entire world in the past five years. 
One of the pioneers, incidentally, in the container busi- 
ness is a native Tarheel, Malcolm McLean. 

Probably the most modern port in the world today is 
Rotterdam in the Netherlands, which was completely 
rebuilt since World War II and has risen to a place 
of prominence as probably the Number One port of the 
world. In the harbor at Rotterdam is a magnificient 
containerized port facility. 

Wilmington, North Carolina was one of the first 
Atlantic ports to become ready to handle containerized 
cargo. There is a large open berth for containers with 
gantry cranes already in operation at Wilmington. 
Morehead City is being prepared for containerized 
cargo, and two companies interested in container oper- 
ations have completed negotiations with the Morehead 
City Terminal. 

All of this planning for containers and the trend in 
consolidated cargo has stimulated changes in the 
trucking industry and in the railroad industry. The 
North Carolina Motor Carriers Association is currently 
conducting a campaign for dual trailer operations. 
Dual trailers and containerization are related. 

Dual trailers are two trailers hitched together in 
tandem pulled by one tractor. The total length of the 
rig is 65 feet, as compared to 55 feet now, which 



means that the two trailers hitched together over-all 
are 10 feet longer than the present tractor-trailer as 
we know it. These trailers are used in the western 
United States to the mutual advantage of shippers and 
carriers. 



eAfo/ttd Q,ahokm Sdippmg Co. 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 

STEVEDORES 
MOREHEAD CITY, NORTH CAROLINA 



TWX: 919-255-2925 
Phone: 919-726-6173 
P. O. Box 650 



F.M.C. License #1079 
Cable Address 
"Davies" 



16 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



WADE H. PIERCE 
Manager — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager — Export Dept. 



JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 
Charlotte, N. C. Morehead City, N. C. 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

• 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



SOUTHEASTERN NORTH CAROLINA 

INDUSTRIAL SITES 

AVAILABLE 



On Deep Water & Barge Channels 
Available Labor 

Good Transportation 
Year Round Climate 
Ideal Living Conditions 
Inquires Invited 



RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

FOR BRUNSWICK COUNTY 




POST OFFICE BOX 638 PHONE (919) 457-6356 

SOUTHPORT, NORTH CAROLINA 28461 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



EXPORTUNITIES 




LEAD. 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



Soap, Detergents, Cleaning Preparations, 
Perfumes, Cosmetics 

Zambia — Perfumes, cosmetics, toilet preparations. 



Agricultural Chemicals 

South Africa — Insecticides; fungicides; herbicides. 



Meat Products 

Germany — Frozen poultry and small game, includ- 
ing parts. 



Tobacco Snuff 

Thailand — American flue-cured Virginia leaf tobac- 
co type 12 or 13 in various grades. 



Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Congo — Material for men's, women's shirts. 

Yarn, Thread Mills, Products 

Ghana — Cotton yarn. 

Textile Goods 

Norway — Cordage, cable, and rope of natural hard, 
soft, and man-made fibers. 

Women's, Misses', Juniors' Outerwear 

Zambia — Ladies' dresses. 

Household Furniture 

Zambia — Knocked down household furniture. 

Paper Mills, Products 

Thailand — Paper cups, plates. 



Synthetic Materials 

Pakistan — Yarns; rayon, viscose, deniers 55, 60, 75, 
100, 120. 



18 



Cutlerty, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

Zambia — Machine tools for maintaining machines 
in small machine shop. 

Fabricated Structural Metal Products 

Zambia — Prefabricated housing. 

Farm Machinery 

France — Agricultural machinery and farm equip- 
ment for use in preparation and maintenance of soil, 
planting, seeding, harvesting operations ; attachments, 
spare and replacement parts for agricultural machin- 
ery of American origin. 

Metalworking Machinery 

Germany — Metalcutting tools and machinery, chip 
detaching. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Ghana — Textile machinery for weaving, spinning, 
dyeing. 

Indonesia — Woodworking machinery of all kinds, 
including small types. 

Office, Computing, Accounting Machines 

Indonesia — Air-conditioning units and installations, 
deepfreeze and cooling equipment, airdryers and hu- 
midifiers, installations for deep frozen foods, dry- 
frozen foodstuffs preserving equipment. 

Electrical Machinery, Equipment, Supplies 

Ghana — Automotive batteries. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Congo — Automotive spare parts. 




Before you ride off in all directions... 
talk to a Wachovia International Specialist. 



Doing business abroad can be frustrating. But it 
doesn't have to be. 

You can let a Wachovia International Specialist 
smooth the way for you. His fingers are on the eco- 
nomic pulse of six continents. He can assist you in 
buying or selling in every major world market. You 
can also turn to Wachovia's International Department 
for trade leads, credit reports, untangling exchange 
regulations, acceptance financing, letters of credit, 
collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 
So, before you take off in all directions, talk to 
Wachovia. 



INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 



BANK & TRUST COMPANY 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 

WAREHOUSES : Storage warehouses of 400,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Bonded warehouse space available. Additional 
100,000 square foot warehouse ready for oc- 
cupancy July 1967. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL : Customs Appraisal Ser- 
vice provided in modern appraiser warehouse 
at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tank- 
ers ; depth of 34 feet at mean low water (being 
deepened to 38 feet), and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 506,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, 
open ends, 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, over- 
head bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Thirteen acres paved open 
storage, accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both truck and rail cars. Certified weight- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron. Depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouses, 
entire length. Storage yard for 370 freight cars. 



S0UTHP0RT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



FRIEDERICHS 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. 
Capacity — seven 500-foot vessels simultane- 
ously. Channel and turning basin depth — 34 
feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet). 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry 
cranes used single or in tandem and equipped 
for 80-inch magnets and 2 and 6-yard bucket 
operation. One 35-ton locomotive crane. Four 
Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
of various sizes and accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and 5-ton mobile crane. Facilities for 
full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses ; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com- 
panies and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 





A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 




WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,625 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing six 500-ton cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 35 
feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three transit sheds of 220,000 
square feet. Two constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry and one of metal. All with sprink- 
ler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES : Seven storage warehouses, total- 
ing 556,000 square feet, with sprinkler and de- 
luge systems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE : Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 
track full length of rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 

with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for 
full palletization cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 
Berths 6 and 7 are being constructed for gantry 
cranes. 
BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage 
and shipment of bulk cargoes is now under con- 
struction. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses ; also easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum Cyanide and Acritet Fumigation facili- 
ties. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel chambers, fully 
mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern- A&EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Rail- 
road and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY : Securitv force on duty at all times. 




Your symbol for 

banking in the 

growing port cities 




FIRST-CITIZENS BANK 

the Can-Do Bank with the Can-Do People! 

In Morehead City, Wilmington and other fine North Carolina Communities ■ CAPITAL AND SURPLUS: OVER $27,000,000 ■ Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



7865 



TOI 

Years 
Now 



1966 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Carondelet Building 

JAckton 5-8164 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



Now York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHItehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 401 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent* 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 
■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 919-728-31 15 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



23 



e 

GLASGOW HICKS 
COMPANY 


1 


k 


YOUR/i 
innate A 


1 ma 




kr 


MARINE INSURANCE 

509 MURCHISON BUILDING PHONE 762-1806 

P. O. BOX 1678 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACH EY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY. N.C. 

P.O. Box 232. Tel: (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO. 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F.M.C No 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 



1211 McCall Street 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
P. 0. Box 93 
Citizens Bank Bldg. Atando Station 

Norfolk Charlotte. N C 28286 

Virginia 
Newport News 
at 125-B Twenty-Sixth Street 



Richmond, Va. 
Travelers Bldg. 



Alexandria. Va. 
P 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADQUARTERS. TRUCKING IUIIDING, RAIEIGH 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr. -Export Dept. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



^InUAlU^ 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 







SULK RATE 




U 5 Poitog* 




PAID 




RoUigh, N C 




Ptrmil No 32 






WOULD YOU BELIEVE 
THAT IN THE YEAR 1869 

• THE VACUUM CLEANER WAS INVENTED 

• THE NATIONAL PROHIBITION PARTY WAS ORGANIZED 

• CHEWING GUM WAS PATENTED 

• THE FIRST CORNCOB PIPE WAS MANUFACTURED 

• THE GRAND CANYON WAS FIRST EXPLORED 

AND THEN SOMETHING 
REALLY IMPORTANT HAPPENED 

HEIDE WAS BORN 
WHAT MORE IS THERE TO SAY? 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC 



FOUNDED 1869 



(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 
WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight Forwarders • Stevedores 



\£A, Cafij&tuico 



11 IN JH IK 



Summer, 





Before you ride off in all directions... 
talk to a Wachovia International Specialist. 



Doing business abroad can be frustrating. But it 
doesn't have to be. 

You can let a Wachovia International Specialist 
smooth the way for you. His fingers are on the eco- 
nomic pulse of six continents. He can assist you in 
buying or selling in every major world market. You 
can also turn to Wachovia's International Department 
for trade leads, credit reports, untangling exchange 
regulations, acceptance financing, letters of credit, 
collection of drafts for goods shipped abroad. 
So, before you take off in all directions, talk to 
Wachovia. 



INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 



BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 24 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County — 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. 1 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

Glasgow Hicks Co 24 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach 24 

Heide Company, Inc Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. ...Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line ...—-_ 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc 23 

New Hanover County ...11 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co 17 

North Carolina National Bank -19 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 1 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co. 17 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. 23 




'■" @IMlU^ 



We can't promise you'll "grin-from-ear- 
to-ear" like Alice's cat when you ship 
over Southern. But you can count on a 
satisfied smile. Why not try us and see? 



SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. 0. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N. C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Teh (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

RICHARD H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Operations Manager 

W. MURLE TEACHEY, Traffic Manager 

PERCY WEST, Export and Documentation Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P. O. Box 232. Teh (919) 726-5080 

JACK TILLEY, District Manager 

KENNETH SKINNER, Assistant District Manager 



U.S. Secretary 
of Transportation 

visits 
North Carolina 




BOYD 




MOORE 



The North Carolina World Trade Association brought 
off another first on July 26th in Raleigh. The Secretary 
of Transportation, Alan S. Boyd, arrived on the scene to 
visit Governor Moore and be the guest of the North 
Carolina World Trade Association, and their guests, at a 
$10.00 a plate Luncheon in Raleigh. 

Charles Harris of Charlotte, sort of a father emeritus 
of the World Trade Association, gave the invocation. 
Edgar Kirk, Vice President, North Carolina National 
Bank, Raleigh, was master of ceremonies. Kirk also 
doubles as Chairman of the Regional Export Expansion 
Council. Leon E. Moody, President of the N. C. World 
Trade Association, introduced Governor Dan Moore, after 
making the guests welcome to Raleigh. Governor Moore 
introduced The Honorable Alan S. Boyd, Secretary of 
U. S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D. C. 

There were over three hundred people in attendance. 
At the head table, representing the transportation in- 
dustry and state agencies involved were: Chairman of 
the Ports Authority, E. N. Richards; Chairman of the 
Highway Commission, Joseph M. Hunt; Chairman of the 
Board of Conservation & Development, C. W. York; 
President of the Motor Carriers Association, Marvin 
Koonce; President of the N. C. Railroad Association, 
M. V. Barnhill; President of the Piedmont Air Lines, 
Thomas Davis; President North Carolina Press Associa- 
tion, Henry Oglesby; President N. C. Association of 
Broadcasters, William Roberson; President of the Travel 
Council of North Carolina, Mrs. Roland Potter; U. S. 
Senator Sam Ervin; Former Governors Terry Sanford 
and Luther Hodges. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 
WILLIAM B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
JOSEPH FOIL, Greensboro 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayettevillc 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte 

HENRY LEE WEATHERS, Shelby, V. Chairman 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



2 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



SUMMER ISSUE, 1967, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 13, NO. 2 



R. A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce if Exec. Ass't. 

S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

RAY MATHIS, Representative 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



CONTENTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDRICHS, Operations Manager 



U. S. Secretary of Transportation in Raleigh 

Port Progress 

"Ram Neuse" 

Southport Grows 

Boats on Ships 

Changes in Transportation 

Down Historyland Trail 



Page 
2 
4 
6 
7 
8 
12 
16 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Public Relations 



STATE PORTS 




COVER STORY 

The cover of this issue of the N. C. 
State Ports Magazine is a panoramic 
view of the recently enlarged term- 
inal at Wilmington. This terminal 
dedicated in 1952. has grown to where 
it accommodates seven large mer- 
chant vesels at one time. The latest 
dock extension is shown in the right- 
hand corner, backed up by a 120.000 
square foot transit shed, and the new 
warehouse, almost completed, visible 
immediately behind the transit shed. 




tmwW m ^ mr * 




M 




Left — E. N. Richards, Chairman Ports Authority Shows new 11.6 
million dollar expansion to Mrs. Roland Potter (center) President of 
Travel Council of North Carolina and William Roberson, President of 
North Carolina Association of Broadcasters at Morehead City, July 17. 



The Port 




The General Assembly of 1967 will be noted in history 
as the longest regular assembly. 

Principal interest of the ports will always be the expan- 
sion of port facilities, however, there are many things the 
General Assembly does that affects us directly or indi- 
rectly. Of primary importance to the Ports Authority is 
always the construction of maximum potential highways 
into the port area. The $4,490,000.00 appropriated this 
year for construction at the Ports Authority's two ports 
makes a total of $13,490,000.00 appropriated by the Gen- 
eral Assemblies of 1963-65-67. During this six-year period 
the ports have been allowed to plow back approximately 
two million dollars in warehouses and transit sheds and 
the rehabilitation of old buildings for the occupation of 
new tenants. 

In addition, the Federal Government has loaned the 
Ports Authority, backed up by revenue bonds, a total of 
11% million dollars for the construction of a bulk loading 
facility. This bulk loading facility, although primarily de- 
signed to handle phosphates shipped by barge from the 
Beaufort County-Pamlico area, will also be capable of 



*r 



**: 



i a 



«=» 





handling mo^t any type of bulk or aggregate. It is anti- 
cipated, that in the harbor of Morehead City by the end of 
the year 1968 the traffic will be doubled its present rate. 
Tonnages should quadruple, and the result will, of course, 
lap over into the Wilmington area, where general cargo 
will increase. Traffic will double in the Wilmington 
Harbor also. 

The people of North Carolina can be proud of their 
soon-to-be 37 y 2 million dollar port complexes, fifteen mil- 
lion-plus of this invested in Wilmington, and 22 million 
invested in Morehead City. 

It might be wise here to point out the fact that the 
community of Wilmington and the harbor of the Port 
of Wilmington is much larger than is sometimes realized 
when the news speaks of the North Carolina State Ports. 
The state operates a port terminal at Wilmington, which 
handles general cargo. In the Wilmington harbor are 
several terminals that handle petroleum and bulk ingredi- 
ents, and there are many private manufacturing firms 
who are able to use these private facilities. 

Total tonnage in the Wilmington harbor is approxi- 



mately five million tons annually. This places the Port of 
Wilmington on a par with the Port of Charleston, South 
Carolina tonnage-wise. 

At Morehead City, although the harbor is closer to 
the open sea, the gross tonnages in the harbor at More- 
head City are dominated by the tonnages that flow over 
the terminal of the North Carolina State Ports Authority. 

There is an old formula often quoted in these pages 
which has been devised by ports authorities everywhere 
to estimate the value of the terminal to the hinterland. 

In North Carolina this formula begins to spell out like 
this: one million tons handled at both ports now return 
$15,000,000.00, which is the average of $15.00 per ton, 
according to this Philadelphia formula. This 15 million 
dollars annually is generated into the economy of the 
state. The estimated tonnage by the close of the year 
1968, 2 million tons annually, multiplied by $12.00, be- 
cause of the various factors which will lower the average 
return, equals 24 million dollars as the annual flow into 
the economy generated by the two port terminals. 




Large group sees return of Ram Neuse replica — center: Sawyer, Rowland, Jackson, Pedersen 



BAM NEUSE 
Returns Home 



EXTRACT OF LOG . . . 

Since "RAM NEUSE" left Morehead City January 2nd 
1967 by the Norwegian motor vessel "TOREADOR" for 
a world around trip, she has traveled 31,875 nautical 
miles and called at the following 24 ports. Wilmington, 
N. C. January 5th, and through the Panama Canal 
January 9th, San Francisco January 19th and across the 
Pacific Ocean to Manila, Philippines February 7th, Hong 
Kong February 12th, Bangkok, Thailand February 25th, 
Singapore March 6th, Cebu, Philippines March 12th, 
Manila March 14th, Hong Kong March 16th, Kobe, Japan 
March 21st, Nagoya March 23rd, Shimizu March 24th, 
Yokohama March 27th where from she again crossed the 
Pacific Ocean to Los Angeles April 8th and through 
the Panama Canal and called at Cristobal April 17th, 
New York April 24th, Boston April 27th, Sant John NB. 
Canada May 1st, Wilmington Delaware May 3rd, Phila- 
delphia May 4th, Baltimore May 6th, Philadelphia May 
9th, New York May 12th, Newport News May 14th and 
arrived at Wilmington, N. C. May 15th, which is the end 
of voyage of the good ship "RAM NEUSE." 
Wilmington, N. C, May 15th, 1967. 

J. Winther Pedersen 

Master of M/V "TOREADOR" 




1. to r. W. H. Rowland, Kinslon, Captain Pedersen, H. C. Jackson, 
Director Traffic SPA 



PLAQUE INSCRIPTION 

C. S. S. NEUSE RELICS 

FROM 

AMERICAN CIVIL WAR RAM SHIP 

SUNK 1865— RECOVERED 1963 

PRESENTED TO 

CAPT. J. WINTHER PEDERSEN 

FOR PUBLICIZING 

RAM NEUSE AROUND WORLD 

MAY 14, 1967 

AWARDED BY LENOIR COUNTY 

CONFEDERATE CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE 

KINSTON. NORTH CAROLINA 

U. S. A. 




Southport 
GROWS 



Included in the budget of Appropriations approved by 
the General Assembly was $150,000.00 for the construction 
of covered slips at the Ports Authority's Southport Boat 
Harbor. 

Most people familiar with the coastline of North Caro- 
lina are familiar with Southport. Located at the estuary 
of the Cape Fear River, on the inland waterway, South- 
port has one of the deepest natural harbors on the 
Atlantic Seaboard. However, for many many years it 
has been isolated, except for the paving of highways in 
the course of progress. The railroad comes within about 
seven miles of the historical village. 

Back in 1959 the people of North Carolina passed a 
bond issue, giving a mandate to the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority to construct some kind of harbor facility. 

In 1965 the Southport Boat Harbor was dedicated. 
Operated by the Ports Authority principally as a pleasure 
craft marina, it still contains possibilities as a small 
commercial craft harbor. 

The Coast Guard is now a permanent resident, but 
there was an indication almost immediately; that to 
attract large craft for permanent storage, covered slips 
were needed. The covered slips appropriated for by the 
General Assembly were not requested in the budget by 
the Ports Authority when it prepared its long range 
needs to the Advisory Budget Commission. 

When the contracts are awarded and construction is 
completed on these covered slips it will represent an 
investment of $650,000.00 by the State of North Carolina 
in a marine facility at the picturesque historical com- 
munity of Southport in Brunswick County. 






Mona Lisa 
Comes Ashore 



Yacht "Mona Lisa" — 70' long, 17' beam, 4' draft, weight 
25 tons; Built — Gustafsson & Anderson Varvs A.B., 
Stockholm, Sweden ; Hull — all aluminum except for trim. 

Delivered at Stockholm, piloted to Hamburg, Germany, 
where it was loaded aboard the U.S. Lines S/S AMERI- 
CAN LEADER, via a 200 ton floating crane, for dis- 
charge at North Carolina State Ports Authority Termi- 
nal, Wilmington, N. C. via our two 45-ton gantry cranes. 
The yacht was gently lifted out of its cradle aboard the 
AMERICAN LEADER; "walked" up the dock and lower- 
ed into the Cape Fear River at 7 p.m. on May 9, 1967. 
Two days later the "Mona Lisa" departed "in bond" 
down the inland waterway for final U.S. Customs entry 
at Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The "Mona Lisa" is owned 
by Edward J. Capuano, 168 Stevens Street, Fall River, 
Mass., which was also the home port painted on her 
transom. 



From The Mail Basket 

We note in the Spring, 1967 edition the article on page 
10 concerning a shipment of West Coast lumber brought 
into the State Ports Terminal at Wilmington, North 
Carolina, by the McCoy Industries. This particular article 
was of great interest to us because we were directly in- 
volved with the first shipment of West Coast lumber 
brought into the Port's Authority Terminal at Wilming- 
ton for distribution in the State of North Carolina. This 
shipment of Douglas Fir and Hemlock contained 2,541,000 
board feet and arrived at the State Ports Terminal in 
December, 1953. Unloading was completed in three (3) 
days, and the first shipments began leaving the State 
Ports Terminal for points in North Carolina the first 
week in January, 1954. 



This shipment was brought to Wilmington by the Tabor 
City Lumber Company of Tabor City, North Carolina, 
(Mr. Ernest Sanders, President), and created quite a bit 
of excitement in Eastern North Carolina due to the fact 
that very small amounts of West Coast lumber had been 
used in the eastern part of the state up until that time. 
This first shipment into the port in 1953 was largely 
responsible for the growth in usage of West Coast lumber 
to the degree that it is being used today. It also created 
quite a bit of excitement in the State Ports Terminal 
because it was the largest shipment of lumber of its kind 
and new methods of handling and storing had to be de- 
veloped to take care of this quantity of lumber. 



8 





The 50-foot Hatteras Yacht be- 
ing loaded aboard Hamburg- 
America Line Vessel Nuernberg, 
North Carolina State Ports Au- 
thority, Morehead City, North 
Carolina. 

This yacht destined for West 
Germany. 





WITN TV, Washington, N. C. 
"The high and the mighty" 

Would you believe "Waldemar Eros" Debnam? Well, if you did you'd be right. 

Mr. Debnam, who is referred to by his colleagues as the Dean of Newscasters in 
North Carolina, presents his program "COMMENT" Monday through Friday, 6:15 
P.M. and 11:20 P.M., a WITN-TV editorial sometimes terse, sometimes critical and 
sometimes emotional but always of intense interest and thought provoking. 

Deb was born in Wake County, North Carolina, and grew up in Snow Hill where 
his father, the late J. E. Debnam, was founder of THE STANDARD LACONIC, a 
weekly newspaper. Debnam's news career started at the age of 17. He is now 68. He is 
the author of the book "Weep No More, My Lady" which he wrote in answer to a 
criticism of the South by the late Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt in 1950. The book sold over 
225,000 copies and is still going strong. So is "Waldemar Eros" Debnam. 




DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



Written by Elizabeth W. Wilborn, 
member of the Staff of the State 
Department of Archives and His- 
tory. 

STRANGE CARGO— NORTH 
CAROLINA'S UNUSUAL TWINS 

"Captain Allan . . . offered to 
call a large ship he was then build- 
ing "The African Twins" and give 
our party a free passage to Liver- 
pool. ... I decided to go with 
Captain Graham . . . and on the 
25th day of July 1855 ... we ar- 
rived at Liverpool." Thus W. J. L. 
Miller wrote of his experience with 
the "Two-headed Nightingale," as 
he called Mille-Christine, "Siamese" 
twins born in Columbus County, 
North Carolina, in 1851. This was 
forty years after Eng and Chang, 
the "original" Siamese twins, were 
born in Bangkok. The Bunkers, as 
the male twins were now known, 
had already become adopted North 
Carolinians and settled in Surry 
County where they had married 
the Yates (Yeats) sisters in 1843. 

Each pair of twins, male and fe- 
male, traveled over the world in 
many ships before they finally re- 
tired. Their playbills frequently 
stated the "recent arrival" of the 
twins in one vessel or another, or 
with this or that captain. In the 
manner of the day, these playbills 
were elaborate exaggerations, of- 
ten to the point of lying. One 
stated that Mille-Christine was 
born in Africa. 

The Siamese twins were joined 
by a flexible growth at the breast- 
bone; the African twins were joined 
at the spine. The male twins be- 
came much wealthier, but were a 
great deal less compatible than the 
girls, who lived so harmoniously 
that they referred to themselves as 
"I" instead of "we." Often Eng 
and Chang quarreled violently; 
once they begged a physician to 
separate them, even if death should 
occur. 

Named Milley and Christina by 
their parents, Jacob and Monimia 




McCoy, the girls were sold by their 
owner, Jabe McCoy, before their 
first birthday for $1,000 and 25 
per cent of the exhibition proceeds. 
The New York Times reported in 
1912, when Mille-Christine died, 
that the sale price had been 
$40,000. 

The life of the little Negro twins, 
as well as that of Eng and Chang, 
proved indeed that truth is stran- 
ger than fiction. Before her tenth 



birthday Mille-Christine had twice 
been abducted. Examined by sur- 
geons and physicians, who often 
had to take the stage to help pre- 
vent injury to the girls, Mille- 
Christine was declared to be beyond 
doubt the "most interesting and 
extraordinary . . . departure from 
the ordinary human structure." 
The girls had four feet and legs 
but could walk on two; when the 
hand of one was touched the other 
did not feel the touch — the opposite 
was true when the foot of either 
was touched. 

The girls were intelligent, learn- 
ing to speak two or three foreign 
languages, and were talented musi- 
cally. More than once the gentle 
girls received the royal command 
of Queen Victoria, who presented 
them with personal gifts when they 
sang for her. 

Eng and Chang became very 
wealthy owning two fine residences, 
living an equal length of time with 
each of their wives. They also 
owned slaves and had large land- 




10 



holdings. After the Civil War the 
Siamese twins returned to the ex- 
hibition circuit under P. T. Bar- 
num to recoup their fortunes and 
perhaps to get away from their 
more than twenty children. 

On shipboard, returning from 
Liverpool to America in 1870, 
Chang suffered a stroke which par- 
tially paralyzed him. His health 
continued to decline and in 1874 
Chang died. Within a short length 
of time Eng, who told his wife 
that he was dying, died also. When 
their physician arrived it was too 
late to consider separating the 
twins — a subject often discussed 
during their lifetime. Even in 
death they remained a curiosity; 
a commission was formed to per- 
form an autopsy on them. The 
bodies were shipped from Mt. Airy 
to Philadelphia. Diagnosis was that 
Chang had died from a cerebral 
clot and perhaps congestive heart 
failure with pulmonary edema. One 
doctor felt that Eng had died from 
fright! The twins were finally bu- 



ried in a country churchyard near 
Mt. Airy. 

Mille-Christine retired to Colum- 
bus County where she, her parents, 
and her fourteen brothers and sis- 
ters had once lived. There Mille- 
Christine continued to received vis- 
itors and became noted for her 
generosity. When the ten-room 
house containing their many souve- 
nirs and treasures burned in 1909, 
a six-room cottage was built. It was 
here in 1912 that Mille, who had 
been suffering from tuberculosis, 
died. Christine was immediately a- 
ware of this fact and seventeen 
hours later she joined her beloved 
sister in death. 

No longer the target of skeptics 
and at long last safe from the eyes 
of the curious, Mille-Christine was 
buried in the swampy land of Co- 
lumbus County. 

The strange cargo had reached 
a safe haven. Scattered and broken 
is the tombstone which read : "A 
soul with two thoughts. Two hearts 
that beat as one." 





Wilmington-CTI Heide Co, Inc. 

Products ranging from auto parts to a huge potash 
plant, from pipe-making machinery to cartons of 
insecticide, from a high school chemistry laboratory 
to household goods are moving to overseas destinations 
faster, in better condition, and at lower cost — thanks 
to the skill and experience of Container Transport In- 
ternational Inc. 

From headquarters at 17 State St., New York 10004, 
where its officers see freighters, tankers, and liners 
steaming proudly in and out of New York harbor. CTI 
directs the movement of nearly 12,000 containers. It- 
personnel in 17 branches and its agents in 600 other 
cities give the company a worldwide network dedicated 
to expediting the international shipment of cargo. 




1 1 



CHANGES IN TARHEl 



GIANT SHIPS 
BECOME A 
REALITY 



Port planning for the future is 
going to be radically changed by 
the tremendous ships that are be- 
ginning to catch on. 

The Japanese have just launched 
a 210 thousand ton tanker, capable 
of carrying liquid or dry cargo. 
This monster will draw about fifty- 
one feet when fully loaded. She is 
over one thousand feet long. Her 
beam is about 2% times that of the 
ordinary vessel and her draft about 
twice the fully loaded draft of a 
ten thousand ton merchant ship. 

To give North Carolinians a 
chance to compare, the USS North 
Carolina, now anchored at a per- 
ma berth in Wilmington, is a fifty- 
five thousand ton vessel. The aver- 
age depth of ports everywhere now 
is around thirty to forty feet. The 
construction of these giants, there- 
fore, indicates but two alternatives 
to port planners — deepen your har- 
bor, enlarge your wharf to take 
care of the giant — or do without 
them. The harbor at Amsterdam 
has recently undergone major 
changes, allowing for the entrance 
into harbor of eighty thousand ton 
vessels. 



12 




L TRANSPORTATION 




The State Ports have been a 
fast growing part of the transpor- 
tation picture in North Carolina. 

The early development story of 
the ports is wrapped up in local 
politics, but this has given way to 
a statewide concept and wide sup- 
port from all parts of the business 
community. 

The principal boosters of the 
ports in recent years have been 
those Governors and their admin- 
istrations who were business ori- 
ented from the piedmont. The only 
two exceptions to this long line are 
former Governor Sanford, who 
came from a sandhill county in the 
Cape Fear Country on the edge of 
the piedmont, and Governor Dan 
Moore, who is from the far west- 
ern part of the state. 

When we say, "the history of 
the ports has political overtones" 
we, of course, refer to early pro- 
motion and financing, which stem 
from the General Assembly. 
Whether these overtones are there 
or not, a great record has been 
compiled in recent years of com- 
merce flowing through the North 
Carolina State Port Terminals at 
Wilmington and Morehead City. 
This has affected the total economic 
picture of North Carolina. 

For example: right after World 
War II, during the administration 
of Governor Gregg Cherry, a great 
interest developed to build general 



cargo and freight handling port 
terminals at the seat of historical 
ports of colonial days. 

One of these sites is Morehead 
City, located just across the estuary 
of the Newport River from old 
Port Beaufort. The other was an 
old shipyard site on the bank of 
the Cape Fear River, upstream a 
few miles from the site of Port 
Brunswick, of colonial days. In 
1945, the Ports Authority, as we 
know it today, was created. 

In 1949 a piedmont Governor, 
Kerr Scott, of Alamance County, 
reminded the General Assembly 
that the ports were dying on the 
vine for lack of support. The 
General Assembly that year, 1949, 
responded with a 7% million dollar 
General Obligation Bond Issue, ap- 
propriated by the General Assembly 
without a vote of the people. This 
is not unusual, but at the time the 
General Assembly very wisely, 
since it was going to take this 
giant step in financing the port 
terminals, decided that it would 
put enough checks and balances 
into the physical operation of the 
ports, that the Ports Authority it- 
self must always be careful to 
report back to the Governor and 
the Council of State in all matters 
pertaining to the expenditure of 
capital improvement funds. 

What appeared then to be sort of 
a handicap to progress turned out 




Giant 210.000 ton ship Memitsu Mam. (T1k iH.lilUclli B.liln \cl 

Note size of Jasnnkoa ST. 000 tons compared to ordinary merchantman in backKi-ound. 

13 



*••-**•• ■ 




For the first time anywhere, specially-built crane platforms like those used for offshore oil drilling- were utilized in constructing dams and 

piers in the course of Amsterdam's harbor improvement programs. Crane at left placed basalt blocks in position while the crane at right 

placed revetment of stone asphalt and positioned concrete crown elements. Resting on massive floating pontoons supported by eight retractable 
legs about 164 ft. high, each crane had a 25-ton hoisting capacity. 



to be the very thing that was 
needed to stimulate an interest in 
certain financial circles in these 
port terminals. An interest that 
has been most rewarding and most 
necessary to the remarkable 
growth. 

When the terminals were deci- 
cated in 1952, Governor Scott ap- 
pointed to the Board of the 
Authority, as Secretary and Trea- 
surer, a young man who had become 
associated with him in political 
affairs. The young man was 
destined to become the Governor 
of North Carolina — his name was 
Terry Sanford. During the term 
of former Governor Luther Hodges, 
who, incidentally, was from the 
piedmont also (one of the northern 
piedmont counties), the indicated 
interest in ocean shipping was a 



part and parcel of the policy 
Hodges immediately assumed in 
relationship to industrial expansion. 

It was during these years that 
the State Ports really came of 
age. Local arguments and disagree- 
ments began to fade; the arrival 
of the young administration of 
Sanford and the support that he 
received from the banking inter- 
ests, particularly in the piedmont, 
propelled the State Ports into the 
total industrial development picture 
simultaneously with the efforts 
exerted by President Kennedy and 
the Secretary of Commerce, Luther 
Hodges, on the total world trade 
picture of the United States. 

To sum up briefly, during the 
period from the dedication of the 
port terminals in 1952 to the pre- 
sent day, the world trade of North 



Carolina has increased two and 
one-half times, and at the same 
time the tonnage of the North Caro- 
lina State Port Terminals, which 
was zero in 1951, amounted to over 
one million tons of various cargoes 
and commodities in 1966. The in- 
come from handling this tonnage 
at the docks and in the warehouses 
was over two million dollars, and 
the number of ships handled rose 
to eight hundred twenty-nine at 
the two port terminals, compared 
to a first year's handling of sixteen 
vessels. 

Now what has this all meant to 
the transportation picture in North 
Carolina? Well, traditionally North 
Carolina is served by four principal 
railroads : The Southern Railway 
System, which today terminates at 
Morehead City over the track of 



14 



the A&EC; the Norfolk & South- 
ern, which has for many years 
connected northeastern North Caro- 
lina and the harbor at Hampton 
Roads with the central piedmont; 
the Atlantic Coast Line, formerly 
home based at Wilmington, and 
the Seaboard. With exception of 
the Norfolk & Southern, the general 
routing of these railroad systems 
is north and south. On the creation 
of the port terminal at Morehead 
City during the administration of 
Governor Hodges, efforts were 
made to terminate one of these 
principal railways at Morehead 
City. The logical one, of course, 
turned out to be the Southern, 
whose tracks ran into Goldsboro, 
not too far distant. A lease was 
made between the A&EC Railroad 
and the Southern. 

The logical way to create a flow 
of traffic east-west in North Caro- 
lina had long been sought. There 
were several schools of thought on 
the matter. The lack of industriali- 
zation in the east created no de- 
mand for railroads to move in an 
east-west direction except on spur 
lines. 

Meanwhile, prior to World War 
II, and immediately following 
World War II, North Carolina had 
become the capitol of motor carrier 
transportation in the eastern 
United States. It is said that there 
are more regularly scheduled motor 
carrier units home based in Char- 
lotte and the surrounding area 
than anywhere else in the United 
States. The result has been that 
with the growth of the State Port 
Terminals and the efforts of ship- 
ping companies and related enter- 
prises, there has been a marked 
increase in east-west transportation 
demands by the business com- 
munity. For example: in 1960 
about 7,000 motor carrier units 
and 3,000 rail cars entered or left 
the two state port terminals with 
cargo. The 1966 record shows that 
over 25,000 motor carrier units 
and over 8,000 rail cars loaded or 
unloaded cargo at the two state 
port terminals. During this period 
the world trade increase in North 
Carolina was a whopping 350 mil- 
lion and the total world trade 
picture in North Carolina reached 
over a billion dollars. About 80% 



of all the shippers who use the 
state port terminals profitably are 
from the piedmont section, which 
has been mentioned numerous 
times in this article. 

This piedmont section is high- 
lighted because it is the area of 
the state that was developed 
primarily industrially prior to and 
immediately following World War 
I. 

Needless to say, there is a school 
of thought that believes the re- 
markable industrial growth of the 
piedmont was due to early trans- 
portation arteries. This idea is 
over-simplified by the expression 
that "transportation is the key to 
progress." 

With so much stress being put 
in these years of transportation 
and progress, while industrializing 
total development of North Caro- 
lina, it follows, therefore, that this 
progress will tie to an east-west 
transportation system. 

Highway builders are very con- 
scious now of the fact that when 
the interstate highway transporta- 
tion system was plotted and plan- 
ned in 1950 through 1954 it 
continued to follow the traditional 
routes north and south. For ex- 
ample: 1-85 and 1-95. 

However, to the north we find 
the interstate system runs east and 
west from Hampton Roads Ports 
to the midwest. To the south of 
us there has been completed re- 
cently an interstate spur that runs 
directly from Charleston and con- 
nects to the midwest. To rectify 
this situation, there are several 
highways in North Carolina that 
connect with the interstate system 
that are being brought up to four 
lanes. It is impossible to continue 
over the present right-of-ways and 
have limited access highways such 
as the interstates, but four-laning 
and control of future access, and 
particularly by-passes around tons 
and hamlets, will greatly facilitate 
the N. C. transportation picture. 

One other thing that has happen- 
ed to the transportation picture 
that has direct bearing on the 
growth of the ports and vice versa 
is the industrialization of the area 
in the river valleys, particularly in 
the Cape Fear Valley and between 
Wilmington and Fayetteville; the 



Pamlico River Valley near Wash- 
ington, North Carolina; the Neuse 
Valley between New Bern and 
Goldsboro and then, of course, in 
the immediate areas of the two 
port terminals at Wilmington and 
Morehead City. Some have said 
that over two hundred million dol- 
lars in capital investment has been 
made by private enterprise in the 
Wilmington area since the de- 
parture of the ACL's Home Office 
in the 1950's. 

In the Morehead City area, just 
for example, have been two large 
investments — one by a foreign 
corporation directly tied up with 
ocean shipping, and the recent 
announcement of a phosphate 
handling facility to be built ad- 
jacent to the North Carolina port 
terminal, which will handle some 
three million tons of cargo, con- 
ceivably by 1970. 

At the recent Seminar on Trans- 
portation Development held by 
N. C. State University at Raleigh, 
the President of the American 
Waterways Association said that 
"Ninety-seven industries last 
month purchased property adja- 
cent to the inland waterways or 
ocean shipping lanes." 

In closing, we point out the fact 
that through the foresight of many 
people in the late 1940's and early 
1950's the North Carolina State 
Ports were ready when the tre- 
mendous emphasis of world trade 
began to effect the industries of 
North Carolina. Still overloaded, 
still needing capital improve- 
ments in the way of warehouses 
and transit sheds and gantry 
cranes, the North Carolina State 
Ports have tried to keep abreast 
of this ever increasing trans- 
portation load. 

Perhaps we have been success- 
ful, at least somewhat. 1.000.000 
tons of cargo came our way in 
1966, bringing $2,000,000.00 in in- 
come and generating at least 12 to 
15 million dollars into the economy 
of our hinterland. 

Bj 1970 these figures should rise 
to 2.000.000 tons— $4,000,000.00 in 
income, and $24,000,000.00 into 
the annual economy of North 
Carolina. 



15 




CONTAINERS-MOREHEAD CITY 



The steamship industry has experienced a revolu- 
tion in the handling of cargo with the advent cargo 
containers. 

Joint service of Hamburg-American/North German 
Lloyd Lines (Hapag/Lloyd) has been serving More- 
head City for the past 14 years and they have ex- 
tended this service to include containerized cargo to 
and from the Northern Europe. 

Last year containers began moving through More- 
head City via these lines. Through use of containers, 
shippers are able to receive benefit of 10% reduction 
in ocean on house-to-house shipments and a 5% re- 
duction on pier-to-house or house-to-pier movements. 
Most shippers are aware of the many other advant- 
ages of shipping cargo in sea-containers— the savings 
in export packaging, the minimizing of pilferage and 
damage, etc. 

Vessels calling at Morehead City for the Hapag/ 
Lloyd joint service have been repitted to facilitate 
the handling of containers including current changes 
in ships' gear, where necessary, to handle at Morehead 
City 40 ft. containers with maximum weight. Local 
agents also maintain a pool of empty containers and 
related running gear for transporting containers to 
the shipper's door. Containers are available in a va- 
riety of sizes, from 5 cubic meters to the 40 ft. 
length. 

Tariffs on file with the Federal Maritime Commis- 
sion govern the movement of containers. Container 
rules and regulations covering Morehead City are 
patterned after the North Atlantic ports. This an- 
nouncement came from North Carolina Shipping Co., 
agents for Hapag/Lloyd vessels. 






Containers on dock ready to board. 



16 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 




PHONE 919 726-6173 
FMC #1079 



TWX 919 530-2972 
CABLE "DAVIES" 



AGENTS FOR HAMBURG AMERICAN/NORTH GERMAN LLOYD LINES 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



WADE H. PIERCE 
Manager — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager — Export Dept. 



JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. M(r. — Import Dept. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 



m±M*u. 



F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



g^ BARBER 

LINE 

Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coost Shipping Co., P. O. Box No 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



EXPORTUNITIES 




Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh. N. C. 



TRADE LEADS 



] 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 




I 



Electric Lighting, Wiring Equipment 

France — Electric fluorescent lamps, fixtures ; electric 
lighting fixtures of special character. 

Motor Vehicles, Motor Vehicle Equipment 

Colombia — Motor vehicle equipment. 



Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

France — Cotton upholstery fabrics. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Wool 

France — Upholstery fabrics, wool. 

Floor Covering Mills, Products 

France — Tufted carpets, woven textile fiber carpets. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings, 
Work Clothing 

France — Sport shirts; men's sport trousers. 

Tires, Tubes 

Netherlands — Automotive tires, inner tubes. 

Farm Machinery 

Colombia — Agricultural machinery, spare parts for 
same. 

Construction, Mining, Materials Handling 
Machinery, Equipment 

Colombia — Construction machinery, equipment. 



Special Industry Machinery 

France — Machinery for textile industries. 
Trinidad, W. I. — Woodworking machinery for manu- 
facturing toys. 



General Industrial Machinery 

France — Power transmission chains. 



Shipbuilding, Repairing 

Luxembourg — Small pleasure boats. 

Instruments For Measuring, Controlling, 
Indicating Physical Characteristics 

Thailand — Air conditioning and refrigeration auto- 
matic controls. 

Photographic Equipment 

France — Photocopying machines. 

Engineering, Laboratory, Scientific, Research 
Instruments 

France — Aircraft flight instruments; altimeters, 
compasses, automatic flight control systems, airspeed 
and mach indicators, turn and bank indicators, gyro 
instruments, automatic pilots, periscope sextants. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

Luxembourg — Toys, amusement, sporting, athletic 
goods. 

Logging Camps, Logging Contractors 

France — Hickory logs, veneer quality. 

Household Furniture 

Luxembourg — Household furniture, camping equip- 
ment. 

Converted Paper, Paperboard Products 

Austria — All types of paper products used in cater- 
ing, hotel trade; including paper table cloth, paper 
bed cloth, disposable plates, trays, cups. 



18 



A bank doesn't grow 

this fast by minding 

its own business. 



Growth of Resources 

Through Merger and De Novo Expansion 

of Southeast's Three Largest Banks 

1960 through 1966 

Growth in Resources (1960 = 100) 



180 



160 



140 



120 



NCNB, 



• Other Two 
Banks Combined 



100 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 

Sources: Year-end Statements of Condition. 



■ 



It grows this fast by helping other people with their business. 
And that's exactly what we do at NCNB. We've developed a 
full range of consumer services, including a variety of check- 
ing, savings, trust and loan programs. Recently, we went 
beyond conventional bank services with NCNB BankAmeri- 
card, the state's fastest-growing credit card plan. And we've 
made all these services available at 75 offices in 15 North 
Carolina cities. 

For businessmen, NCNB offers Commercial Checking 
Accounts, Payroll Services, Electronic Billing and Book- 
keeping, Freight Payment Plan and other services. Through 
the Bank Wire System and our National Division, we can 



serve business interests throughout the country. 

And we don't stop there. Our International Department, 
backed by total resources of $949 million and capital funds 
over $60 million, serves importers and exporters through 
letters of credit, acceptance financing, foreign collections and 
exchange and remittance of funds. 

So whether your business is next door at a branch bank 
or anywhere in the world, we can help you tend to it. Just ask 
the people who have helped us to get where we are todav. 

North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Federal Reserve System 



Burlington / Chapel Hill/ Charlotte / Durham /Greensboro / H igh Point / Morganton /North Wilkesboro /Raleigh / Research Triangle / 
Statesville /Tarboro / Tryon / Wilmington / Winston-Salem 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 

WAREHOUSES : Storage warehouses of 400,000 
square feet with sprinkler and deluge systems. 
Bonded warehouse space available. Additional 
100,000 square foot warehouse ready for oc- 
cupancy July 1967. 

CUSTOMS APPRAISAL: Customs Appraisal Ser- 
vice provided in modern appraiser warehouse 
at docks. 

BULK LIQUID PIER: Designed for large tank- 
ers ; depth of 34 feet at mean low water (being 
deepened to 38 feet), and supported by tank 
farm. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Transit sheds with 506,000 
square feet, constructed of steel, concrete and 
masonry with sprinkler and deluge systems. 

CARGO SHELTER: One cargo storage building, 
open ends, 175,000 square feet, constructed of 
concrete and steel. Rail and truck access, over- 
head bridge crane equipped. 

OPEN STORAGE: Thirteen acres paved open 
storage, accessible by rail or truck. 

SCALES: One complete weighing station, hand- 
ling both truck and rail cars. Certified weight- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs, full length of wharf apron. Depressed 
tracks at rear of transit sheds and warehouses, 
entire length. Storage yard for 370 freight cars. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 




HARBOR 



FRIEDERICHS 



WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,695 feet long with a 50-foot apron. 
Capacity — seven 500-foot vessels simultane- 
ously. Channel and turning basin depth — 34 
feet at mean low water (being deepened to 38 
feet). 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry 
cranes used single or in tandem and equipped 
for 80-inch magnets and 2 and 6-yard bucket 
operation. One 35-ton locomotive crane. Four 
Diesel switching locomotives. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
of various sizes and accessories such as cotton 
clamps, etc. Light and heavy tractors and 
trailers and 5-ton mobile crane. Facilities for 
full palletization of cargoes. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Rail and truck 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; ramps for easy access into 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern steel and concrete fumi- 
gation plant with two vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Served by Atlantic Coast Line Rail- 
road and Seaboard Air Line Railroad Com- 
panies and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




\ 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 




A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Souihport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 




WHARF: Constructed of concrete and steel, the 
wharf is 3,625 feet long with a 34-foot apron. It 
is capable of berthing six 500-ton cargo ships 
and one petroleum tanker, with a depth of 35 
feet at mean low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS : Three transit sheds of 220,000 
square feet. Two constructed of steel, concrete 
and masonry and one of metal. All with sprink- 
ler and deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES : Seven storage warehouses, total- 
ing 556,000 square feet, with sprinkler and de- 
luge systems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. 

OPEN STORAGE : Open storage area is available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 
track full length of rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to Port property. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 

with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities for 
full palletization cargoes. Tractors and trailers. 
Berths 6 and 7 are being constructed for gantry 
cranes. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage 
and shipment of bulk cargoes is now under con- 
struction. 

LOADING AND UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading and unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses ; also easy access into transit 
sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum Cyanide and Acritet Fumigation facili- 
ties. Two 9,000 cubic foot steel chambers, fully 
mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern- A&EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Rail- 
road and numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY : Security force on duty at all times. 




Vessel SS TITANIA, Barber West Africa Line, 
discharged 400 tons logs Friday, July 14, direct from 
ship to barge for delivery to Stilley Plywood Corp. 
located in Conway, S. C. The barges are to move via 
inland waterway to destination. The importer was the 
Atlantic Veneer Company, Beaufort, N. C. Steamship 
agent was Waters Shipping Company and stevedoring 
operation was performed by Wilmington Shipping 
Company. 




CAROLINA NITROGEN STORAGE FACILITY ......COMPLETE AT STATE PORTS 



E. Harold Culp, Vice President of Carolina Nitrogen Corporation, announces the completion of a new urea 
bulk storage warehouse located at the N. C. State Ports in Wilmington. 

The new 10,000 ton facility, constructed by the North Carolina State Ports Authority, will be leased to 
Carolina Nitrogen Corporation for its sole use in handling and distributing urea. 

Urea, manufactured at W. R. Grace & Company's plant at Point Lisas, Trinidad, will be shipped to 
Wilmington and stored in the 26,000 quare foot structure for distribution throughout the southeastern United 
States. When in full operation, the new warehouse will be capable of handling 35,000 to 50,000 tons of urea 
annually. 

Prompted by the Company's need to store, bag and have a transport terminus for serving the south- 
eastern market, the complex will have truck and rail facilities for shipping bulk and bag urea. 

Culp says, "This improved facility will provide W. R. Grace & Co. with the most modern chemical bulk 
storage facilities for loading and bagging in the southeastern United States." 




3,000 tons discharged by 45 ton gantry cranes into hoppers & trucked to storage. Discharged from MUSAUONETA Wilmington Shipping Co. 
agents & stevedores. 



22 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



701 

7865 — Years 
Now 



1966 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Bex 23 

PArk 6-5300 

N«W Orleans 12, La. 

CarondaUr Building 

JAckien 5-11(4 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoae. 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 
109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



Now York 4, N. Y. 

IS South William Street 

WHItehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 4B1 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Aoenti 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




■e/iaad Gty 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 919-728-31 15 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



23 




IT 



\^] WITH 
RTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING C0. r INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island -Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO» 2-4232 
Water & Market Sim. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 
OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 





1211 McColl Street 






Charlotte, North Carolina 




Citizens Bank Bld(j. 


Douolas Municipal Airport 


Richmond, Va. 


Norfolk 


Charlotte, N. C. 28208 


Travelers Bldg. 


Virginia 






Newport News 




Alexandria, Va. 


at 105 26th Street 




P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE HEADOUAITEtS. TRUCKING BUILDING. CAIEIGH 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr.-Export Depl. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



PAID 

ftoltioh. N C 

p..™ no n 



We'd be privileged to do your business at Heide 
if you plan to ship 10.000 tons of steel, 
or 8.500 tons of tobacco, 
or 5,000,000 board feet of lumber. 

If your cargo consists of poisonous snakes 
(boxed or unboxed)- 

forget it, 




HEIDE COMPANY, INC. 

Founded 1869 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



ft I 

7-/3/3 



North Carolina State Library m. C 

^^^ Raleigh Doc. 





<^**4^,*r 



«PMM 



i <Hi' 



A bank doesn't grow 
this fast by minding 

its own business. 



Growth of Resources 

Through Merger and De Novo Expansion 

of Southeast's Three Largest Banks 

1960 through 1966 

Growth in Resources (1960 = 100) 



180 



NCNB, 



Vt-JSa 



■ 

.»-.■■'■''■■•■ 

•■ ■••' mmk 

m , 



160 



140 



• Other Two 
Banks Combined 



100 



1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 

Sources: Year-end Statements of Condition. 



It grows this fast by helping other people with their business. 
And that's exactly what we do at NCNB. We've developed a 
full range of consumer services, including a variety of check- 
ing, savings, trust and loan programs. Recently, we went 
beyond conventional bank services with NCNB BankAmeri- 
card, the state's fastest-growing credit card plan. And we've 
made all these services available at 75 offices in 15 North 
Carolina cities. 

For businessmen, NCNB offers Commercial Checking 
Accounts, Payroll Services, Electronic Billing and Book- 
keeping, Freight Payment Plan and other services. Through 
the Bank Wire System and our National Division, we can 



serve business interests throughout the country. 

And we don't stop there. Our International Department, 
backed by total resources of $949 million and capital funds 
over $60 million, serves importers and exporters through 
letters of credit, acceptance financing, foreign collections and 
exchange and remittance of funds. 

So whether your business is next door at a branch bank 
or anywhere in the world, we can help you tend to it. Just ask 
the people who have helped us to get where we are today. 

North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Federal Reserve System 



Burlington / Chapel Hill / Charlotte / Durham /Greensboro / High Point / Morganton / North Wilkesboro / Raleigh / Research Triangle / 
Statesville /Tarboro /Tryon / Wilmington / Winston-Salem 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines ._ _ -17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 24 

Branch Banking & Trust Co. _. __ ..22 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. 24 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First-Citizens Bank _ ....15 

Heide Company, Inc.-Luckenbach 1 

Heide Company, Inc. .„. Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line —23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. — 23 

New Hanover County 24 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. _ _17 

North Carolina National Bank . .Inside Front Cover 

Ryan Stevedoring Co. ..22 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. .19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 1 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co 17 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. 23 




e4>. 



Ever get the feeling that shipping prob- 
lems are pushing you "down under"? 
When you do, give one of our Sales Rep- 
resentatives a call. He'll "jump" at the 
chance to serve you. Why not try us 
and see? 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT. AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. 0. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



Heide Company, Inc. 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Teh (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant Generol Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Deportment 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



Three Live Governors 



On the occasion of the visit of the 
U. S. Secretary of Transportation to 
North Carolina on July 25th, this 
very rare photograph was made. 
(Left to Right) Governor Dan K. 
Moore, U. S. Secretary of Transpor- 
tation Alan S. Boyd, former Gover- 
nor Terry Sanford and former Gov- 
ernor Luther H. Hodges. 

Shortly after this photo was made 
Boyd spoke to a 300-plate Luncheon 
of transportation-minded North Car- 
olinians. A few days later Sanford 
flew to Austria to teach for two 
months and Hodges resumed his role 
as the newly elected President of 
Rotary International, which will 
take him into fifty-two countries dur- 
ing the twelve months. 

Governor Moore said farewell to 
his guests and continued to hold the 
N. C. Ship of State on a steady 
course. 



On September 21st, 
Governor Moore an- 
nounced the appoint- 
ment of three Board 
Members to the North 
Carolina State Ports 
Authority. 





KIRKWOOD ADAMS 



HOLLAND 



PHARR 



Swearing in of New Members 

More details on new Authority members in next issue. 



RICHARDS 



Kirkwood Adams 

Sworn in previously in a private 
ceremony at home was Kirkwood 
Adams, Executive Vice-President of 
the Albemarle Paper Company op- 
erations in Roanoke Rapids. Mr. 
Adams formerly served on the Ports 
Authority from 1957 to 1961. He 
is married to the former Sarah 
Chaney. They have one son and two 
daughters. 

Lawrence R. Bowers 

Sworn in that same day, in Ra- 
leigh, with Chairman E. N. Richards 
presiding and Judge Raymond Mal- 
lard administering the Oath of Of- 
fice, was Lawrence R. Bowers of 
Whiteville. Bowers is a newcomer 
to the Ports Authority. He is the 
top executive officer of the Wac- 
camaw Bank & Trust Company, 



which has branches in southeastern 
North Carolina in eighteen com- 
munities. In the receiving line were: 
Richards, Mallard, Mr. and Mrs. 
Bowers and their son, Vinson. 

William Pharr 

William J. Pharr of McAdenville 
was appointed for another six-year 
term, his six-year term having ex- 
pired recently. He was first ap- 
pointed to the Board of the Author- 
ity by Governor Terry Sanford in 
1961. Pictured here is Pharr being 
sworn in by George C. Holland, 
Clerk of Court of Gaston County. In 
the receiving line immediately af- 
terwards were Pharr, Mrs. W. J. 
Pharr; their daughter and son, Mr. 
and Mrs. Martin Carstarphen and 
a grandson, William Pharr Car- 
starphen. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

I N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
CIRK.WOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
.. R. BOWERS, Whiteville 
V. B. GLENN, Greenville 
.AMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
VILLI AM PHARR, McAdenville 
JEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville, V.Chm. 
[ H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Exec. Com. 
I L. WEATHERS, Shelby 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



t, A. Df.VANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't. 

S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 

RAY MATHIS. Representative 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 






MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE POUTS 



s 



AUTUMN ISSUE, 1967, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. r*. NO s 

/? 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Congressional Delegations Visits 4 

Southport Pilots 7 

Down the History Land Trail 8 

Guided Missile Vessel 10 

Hongkong 12 

Boiler Makers 14 

New Steamship Services 16 

Exportunities 18 

In this issue we present for the first time a continuing feature 
called, "Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is 
being written for us by Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. 
Mrs. Casey has spent many years traveling, particularly in the orient 
and the south seas. This first feature is on Hong Kong. (See Pages 
10 and 11). 

We are also fortunate in this issue to have another "Special" about 
the Lower Cape Fear and the part the picturesque town of South- 
port plays. This article is by Mrs. L. Memory Covington of White- 
ville, North Carolina. Mrs. Covington's uncle was for many years 
Captain of the Pilotage Association at Southport. 

Photo Credits should be given to: Hugh Morton of Wilmington and 
Grandfather Mountain, Bob Simpson, Morehead City, Tom Lindtvit, 
Morehead City, North Carolina Motor Carriers, Babcock & Wilcox. 
Bill Hood 



COVER STORY 

Our front cover is a water color by 
Charles McNeill, showing the famous' 
schooner Ramona lying in the bight 
of Cape Lookout. The Ramona will be 
remembered by sailors as world record 
holder for her class-from San Fran- 
cisco to Hawaii. 

This is one of Charles McNeill's 
better ones, and is an exclusive for 
the cover of the State Ports Maga- 
zine. On publication of this issue, the 
original drawing will be for sale. 

McNeill is very versatile. He is 
Operations Manager for the More- 
head City Terminal; graduated from 
Kingspoint, the U.S. Merchant Ma- 
rine Academy, and at the same time 
is an artist reknowned for water 
colors. 



STATE PORTS 




For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149. Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



epK 




fi to r) Col. Beverly Snow, Kirkwood Adams, U. S. Senator Everette Jordan, F. H. Ross, Jr., E. N. Richards, Lamar Gudger, H. L. Weathers, 
William B. Glenn, U. S. Senator Sam Ervin, Jr., Congressman Basil Whitener, George Purvis, Congressmen Horace Kornegay, David Henderson, 
Alton Lennon, Walter Jones, Roy Taylor, Charles Jonas, L. H. Fountain. 



North Carolina 

Congressmen 

Visit North Carolina 

Ports 

In September ten members of the N. C. Con- 
gressional Delegation with their wives con- 
verged on Wilmington from Washington, D C. 
and several points in North Carolina. 

At the same time, the members of the Ports 
Authority traveled to Wilmington to its head- 
quarters for a public meeting of the Ports 
Authority, called the Annual Meeting. This 
Annual Meeting is held at the Wilmington 
headquarters of the Ports Authority at the 
North Carolina Maritime Building in the at- 
tractive board room each year. 

Similar to any annual meeting of any cor- 
poration, the purposes of the meeting are to 
review the budget for the past year, approve 
the budget for the coming year, and elect the 
officers of the corporation for the coming year. 

The Ports Authority considered itself very 
fortunate to be able to entertain both U. S. 
Senators — Sam J. Ervin, Jr. and B. Everett 
Jordan — as well as Congressmen from all Dis- 
tricts in North Carolina except the 9th, 4th 
and 5th. Two of these were detained in their 
District by previous commitments impossible 
to rearrange, and one of them was detained by 



a sudden illness in his family just prior to de- 
parture time. 

The purpose of the visit of these Congress- 
men, on this occasion, was to gather together 
the men from Washington, D. C. who represent 
all the people of North Carolina so they might 
see first hand the remarkable progress and 
expansion that is taking place at the port 
terminals. 

In recent years the people of North Caro- 
lina have come to realize that the port terminal 
operations at Wilmington and Morehead City 
belong to the entire state. 

For example: Take the 11th District. From 
the 11th, in the far western part of our state, 
comes cargo from three of the largest corpora- 
tions using deepwater terminals. From points 
across the seas comes raw materials bound 
for textile industries near Asheville, and over- 
seas to many countries goes export cargo and 
paper products from Pisgah and Canton. 

Down in the 8th District, in the most popu- 
lous county of North Carolina (Mecklenburg) 
is the site of at least one hundred firms who 
are in some way users of ocean shipping. 

Nearby, in the present 10th District, is Gas- 
ton County, heartland of the textile industry 
and users of ocean freight facilities in great 
numbers. 

It was with this in mind and the fact that 
modern advances in ship building demonstrate 
the need for deeper channels and harbors that 
brought the idea of presenting these needs to 
our Congressmen and Senators. 

On these pages we record a pictorial account 
of this visit. 





ffl " 





(top left) US Senator Sam Erwin, Jr. listens as Charles McNeill talks 
to Congressman David Henderson, 3rd District N. C. on board Hattcras 
Yacht in MHC harbor. 

2nd row — left picture 

Mrs. H. L. Weathers. Congressman Roy Taylor, 11th Dist. N. C. V. S. 
Senators Jordan and Ervhi, Congressmen Ecnnon, 7th Dist., L. H. 
Fountain, 2nd Dist., Horace Korncgay, 6th Dist., and David Henderson, 
3rd Dist. move out of giant concrete warehouse for 106,000 tons stor- 
age of phosphates, nou> under construction. 

3rd row left Congressman Taylor, 11th Dist., speaks to Mrs. Hugh 
Morton, Congressman Charles Jonas, Mrs. Jonas with Mrs. Taylor and 
Mrs. Lamar Gudger looking on. 



top right — (I to r) 

Dale Miller, Washington, D.C., H. L. Weathers, Shelby. Captain Phil- 
lips, Hattcras Yacht Co. and Congressman Alton Lcnnon, :th District, 
look over harbor at MHC. 

2nd row right E. N, Richards. SPA Chairman, looks at V. S. Corps of 
Engineers drcge Gerig. 

I. to r. (Center) Col. Snow. Conaressmen Taylor. Fountain. Senators 
Ervin, Jordan, Congressmen Henderson, Korncgay. 

I to r (right) Col. Beverly Snow talks to Senator Everettc Jordan and 

his assistant Tom Swain. c 



At the Ports Authority annual meeting it was announced that the Ports Authority's advertising program had gained special recognition, 
is a copy of the release: 



VANCOUVER, Canada — North 
Carolina State Ports Authority 
won the trophy for general excel- 
lence in port advertising during 
the last year. Selection was made 
from among 22 entries received 
in the port advertising competi- 
tion sponsored by the American 
Association of Port Authorities. 

AAPA public relations commit- 
tee also announced winners in the 
competition's three categories as 
follows: 

Domestic port advertising — 1, 
North Carolina State Ports Au- 
thority; 2, San Francisco Port 
Authority; 3, Port of New Or- 
leans; 4, Port of Houston. 

For a series — 1, Port of San 
Francisco; 2, Delaware River 
Port Authority; 3, South Carolina 



State; 4, Virginia State Ports 
Authority. 

For international advertising — 
1, Virginia State; 2, Port of New 
York Authority; 3, Port of New 
Orleans. 

North Carolina as overall win- 



ner becomes custodian for one 

year of the "Bear of Oakland" 
speaking tube trophy. Winners in 
each category received mounted 
barometers. 

Judges were John B. Babcock, 
president, American Business 
Press; Charles M. Kinsolving, Jr., 
vice-president, market planning, 
bureau of advertising, American 
Newspaper Publishers Associa- 
tion; Robert E. Kenyon, Jr., ex- 
ecutive vice-president, Magazine 
Publishers Association. 



The J. T. Howard Agency of Raleigh handles the SPA advertising account. At bottom right is L. C. Bruce, Public Relations Director for the 
Ports Authority holding the trophies and standing between U.S. Senator B. Everette Jordan (left), and U.S. Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr. who 
were also in attendance at the meeting. Sen. Ervin said on this occasion "All North Carolinians are indebted to the State Ports Authority whose 
efficient operation of our ports at Wilmington and Morehead City is enriching the economic life of our state." 




LENNON PHARR JONAS DAVIS WHITENER JONES RICHARDS 




Identifiable above are. Mrs. R. A. DeVane, Mrs. James W. Davis, Mrs. Charles Jonas, 
're. R. G. Lloyd, R. A. DeVane, R. G. Lloyd, Mrs. George Purvis, William H. Glenn, 
ongressmart Charles* Jonas, George Purvis. 



JORDAN 



BRUCE 



South Port Pilots 

"Speak^our vessel" 




Over 200 years ago, sea weary 
mariners from distant ports ap- 
proached the Cape of Feare cautious- 
ly, dropped anchor, and reached for a 
spy glass to scan the Carolina coast. 
Passage into the river could be found 
through hidden beaches, streams and 
marshes near where early European 
adventurers had named the Frying 
Pan Shoals. 

As in all ports, a pilot familiar 
with tidal currents, which run from 
the bar with great velocity toward 
the channel, must come aboard to 
guide the vessel to its harbor. 

The wait was neither long nor 
dull. By sail and sweep, small boats 
navigated the ocean bar. Rival pilots 
on shore, keeping watch with tele- 
scopes, had spied a ship looming 
over the horizon. Each was eager to 
earn the lucrative fee awarded the 
first pilot to "speak the vessel." 

From the river mouth between 
Baldhead Island and Old Fort Cas- 
well, up 30 miles to the City of Wil- 
mington, The Cape Fear River sepa- 
rates a narrow neck of land from 
the coast. Nor'easters have occa- 
sionally used this landfall as a stamp- 
ing ground through the years, the 
shoals tend to shift, so frequently, 
directions need a pilot's care. 

For a century and one half, man 
battled nature for control of these 
waters for commercial shipping. The 
very life of the early colonies de- 
pended on commerce and trade, so no 
more heroic and valuable services 
were performed by any 18th century 
Americans than those of the early 
Cape Fear pilots. There were few 
charts, river markings, no buoys or 
whistles to guide the ships. Depth was 
felt for with lead lines cast from the 
bow as the ship moved through the 
estuary of the river. 

Before 1751, there was no legal 



ts. A law en- 
acted then placed them under a board 
of commissioners, restricted the num- 
ber to seven or less, and set regu- 
lated fees. Later, another Act in- 
creased in number made provision 
for apprentices, and provided fees to 
be charged according to the draft of 
vessels. 

"The New York Herald gave a 
daily schedule of ships to seek berth 
at Wilmington. Knots could be fig- 
ured and arrival of mechanized ves- 
sels estimated, but sailing vessels 
often required three to four weeks' 
watch at a telescope. Rivalry to bring 
ships in, developed into keen compe- 
tition." 

Today, the Wilmington Cape Fear 
Pilotage Association is composed of 
nine competent navigators appointed 
by the Board of Navigation and 
Pilotage of Cape Fear Bar and River. 
Each pilot has qualified witn a 
thorough knowledge of the channel, 
courses of the well charted river, dis- 
tances and characteristics of the well 
lighted harbor, and is licensed by both 
the U.S. Coast Guard and State 
Board of Navigation. 

From a watchtower by water's edge 
at Southport, a constant vigil is 
maintained to assist vessels needing 
pilotage through the famous waters 
of the Cape Fear. Two trim, sea- 
worthy launches equipped with ship- 
to-shore radio telephones stand by in 
constant readiness to convey the 
pilots to meet incoming vessels, or 
bring him in when an outgoing ship 
has been piloted to deep waters. 

Each pilot carries a walkie-talkie 
radio with an effective reach of 25 
miles, by means of which safe ren- 
dezvous is arranged for ships to pass 
in the river. They have daily knowl- 
edge of local winds and currents, are 
able to tell by motion of the ship 



L. Memory Covington 

where the safe and modern channel 
is. The vessel is actually steered by 
the ship's quartermaster or an able 
seaman, under direction of the Cape 
Fear pilot. In heavy mists and fogs, 
the radar screen will show unfamiliar 
objects and give warnings of possible 
trouble. 

The most hazardous part of the 
pilot's job is boarding and debarking 
by means of a ladder slung over the 
ship's side. This can be dangerous 
in rough weather. On rare occasions, 
the open seas become too rough for 
the pilot to debark, and he is carried 
to the next port. He therefore must 
sometimes travel unexpectedly. 

To meet and take a ship through 
the Cape Fear River and return to 
station requires about five hours. 
Watch is 24 hours per day, and the 
duty board changes roster every 48 
hours so that pilots may share 
alike in calls. All fees are paid to 
their Association and divided equally 
among members of their organiza- 
tion after costs of operation are de- 
ducted. 

The modern channel is 400 feet 
wide, now has a (mlw) depth of 34 
feet being dredged to 38 feet. This 
dredging is almost complete. The 
depth at ocean bar will be 40 feet. 
An appropriation is being talked to 
dredge a modern anchorage. The 
present anchorage will not accommo- 
date enough big ships, so they wait 
at the bar occasionally. 

North Carolina's Cape Fear is the 
only river between the New York 
Hudson and the Georgia Savannah 
which empties directly into the Atlan- 
tic Ocean. Extending almost 200 
miles into the heart of the state, it 
has made a great contribution to the 
economic growth of all North Caro- 
lina perhaps, than any other inland 
waterway in the borders of our state. 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



by 
(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilborn 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and History 



Wilmington - A Very Commercial City 




In the year 1808 John O'Neill writing in A 
New and Easy System, of Geography and Popular 
Astronomy stated in a section about North Caro- 
lina that the Wilmington District was comprised 
of the counties of Brunswick, New Hanover, 
Onslow, Duplin, and Bladen. The chief towns of 
the district were "Smithville Southport, Wilming- 
ton, Swannsborough, Sarecto, and Elizabeth- 
town." A list of the most populous towns in the 
state included Wilmington, "a very commercial 
city, situated on the eastern side of the east 
branch of the Fear river, which contains about 
1,700 inhabitants." One of the capes named was 
the Cape Fear "near the south entrance of Cape 
Fear river, remarkable for a shoal called from 
its form the Frying Pan." The writer added that 
while the citizens of North Carolina were not dis- 
tinguished for their literary superiority, the state 
"had not been deficient in producing Men of rank 
and talent." 
8 



One of these men was Governor Gabriel John- 
ston, who opened a land office at then Newton, 
now Wilmington, in May, 1735. He was instru- 
mental in getting the General Assembly to meet 
there in 1741 and 1746. In 1739 the town was in- 
corporated as Wilmington, named for Johnston's 
friend, Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington. 
Wilmington was a borough town until 1835, when 
the constitution of that year did away with 
borough towns. 

Serving as burgesses at various times from 
1740 to 1777 were Thomas Clark, Lewis DeRos- 
set, Cornelius Harnett, and William Farris. Har- 
nett also served at the first and second Conven- 
tions ; others serving at conventions were Francis 
Clayton, A. MacLaine, and William Hooper. To 
be eligible as a burgess, one must have been a 
freeholder, but not necessarily a resident. At 
times the few inhabitants conducted hotly con- 
tested elections. Bath, Brunswick, and Campbell- 
ton were boroughs but were disfranchised by the 
Constitution of 1776. 

Wilmington citizens were determined that their 
town should endure and their voices were often 
raised in the Assembly in an effort to improve 
their town or to protect naval stores, the princi- 
pal export of the Cape Fear port. 

By 1814 the deep sea port at Wilmington was 
receiving the schooners and brigs captured by 
the American "Navy." 

One of these ships was the British privateer 
"Mars," which mounted twelve guns, besides two 
in the hold, a fine vessel, sent into Wilmington. 
When the "Mars" was boarded she was off Cape 
Florida and had about 46 blacks on board, the 
white crew except the captain and one other hand 
rowed off, fearing impressment. "This vessel had 
done an astonishingly active business among the 




neutrals. She had taken about twenty-six of them 
and one American vessel." 

The "Lady Prevost" of London, in ballast, was 
sent into Wilmington by the Letter of Marque 
"Invincible" of Salem, Massachusetts. The 
schooner "Phoebe," with rum and molasses, was 
sent into Wilmington by the Letter of Marque 
ington. Many of the schooners and brigs carried 
sugar, salt, iron, bread, flour, and one even car- 
ried "a quantity of cash, in gold. . . ." Naturally. 
the "Chasseur," which had captured the schooner, 
divested her of the precious metal and burned 
her. An added statement read, "we are more 



pleased with this capture than of five honest Eng- 
lishman." 

Some of the vessels were described as "ele- 
gant"; some cargoes were worth $30,000, some 
$50,000, one "envoiced at £80,000 pounds ster- 
ling." 

His Britannic majesty's schooner "Balaboo" 
was going into port and was chased by a brig, 
"which struck on the Pan (a shoal) her sails were 
immediately lowered, and she disappeared in an 
instant!" 

The list of prizes taken during the War of 1812 
shows that Beaufort and Bath also had their 
share of crippled or stripped vessels. 



Guided missile 
vessel visits 



Captain Fred Kelly, a real U. S. 
Navy operator, who looks the part, 
entertained his guests on board 
the frigate Yarnell at Morehead 
City in typical Navy style. 

Below is a description of the 
trip as it appeared in a local news- 
paper. 

The trip came about as a result 
of the efforts of the Ports Author- 
ity's public relations director in- 
viting a Vice-Admiral, who is a 
native TARHEEL, to come to 
North Carolina in a sort of a re- 
union event. 

For two years the Ports Author- 
ity has wanted the Public Rela- 
tions Society of Raleigh to see 
first hand one of our fine terminals. 

Due to the fortunes of war, the 
Vice-Admiral could not come, but 
through the efforts of Raleighite, 
Commander Robert Perry, USN, 
the Navy sent a fine represent- 
ative with Captain Kelly, his offi- 



cers, and his men, and here it is — 
the way it occurred : . . . 

Seventy-six public relations exec- 
utives and their families from the 
Raleigh Public Relations Society 
boarded the USS Harry E. Yarnefl. 
a Guided Missile frigate, recently 
for a day-long cruise. 

The trip actually began the day 
before when the group left on a 
chartered bus from the Raleigh 
Naval Reserve Training Center. In 
Morehead City they were met by 
L. C. Bruce of the State Ports 
Authority. 

The captain and his crew were 
on hand to personally welcome each 
member of the society aboard next 
morning. Coffee and doughnuts 
were served in the officers' ward- 
room then Capt. Frederick J. Kel- 
ly guided the 533-foot, 7,650-ton 
vessel through the port basin into 
the Atlantic. 






T 



It was explained that the Yar- 
nell is equipped with the most mod- 
ern weapons afloat with the capa- 
bility to deal effectively with any 
threat on, under or above the seas 
Her search radars and Terrier 
guided missile systems equip her 
to locate and destroy aircraft many 
miles from the ship. Also her pow- 
erful sonar and rocket-assisted 
homing torpedo— the ASROC— en- 
ables her to detect and destroy sub- 
marines at extended ranges. 

After an explanation of the pro- 
cedures used with the launcher 
tor the Terrier missiles, Captain 
Kelly jrave a speed demonstration 
exhibiting- the maneuverability of 
the vessel's 85,000 horsepower. 

The afternoon was spent in small 
groups touring the inside opera- 
tions of the ship including the 
bridge, radar and all defense sys- 
tems. Each society member had a 
turn at the helm. 

The final demonstration before 
heading for port was the "Man 
Overboard Drill." In which attend- 
ants were impressed with the speed 

TL S , ki .!L With which a dummv 
dubbed Oscar" was retrieved from 
the sea. 

THE RALEIGH TIMES, Thursday 
September 7, 1967 




1st of a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 

containing her impressions and highlights of her 
visits to the Harbors of the World. 



Hongkong, which means Fra- 
grant Waters, is not just a beau- 
tiful, bustling British harbor glued 
to the tip of China; to me it is a 
fascinating enigma. 

Until recently it seemed to have 
disproved Kipling's declaration 
that "East is East and West is 
West and never the twain shall 
meet." Now, despite 30 years re- 
maining of Britain's 99 year lease, 
the Red Chinese dragon breathes 
fire down its neck. 

Shades of aromatic joss-sticks; 
free port bargains; mini-skirted 
Susie Wongs; world trade; clack- 
ing mah-jong tiles; British coloni- 
alism; urgent boat hootings; mill- 
ing Chinese refugees; and cricket 
clubs — Hongkong is a fabulous, 
self-developed world's fair. A fair, 
so far, open to all the world. 

Officially named Victoria Harbor, 
Hongkong is among the world's ten 
busiest shipping ports and is the 
only typhoon-safe, deep-sea anchor- 
age between Shanghai and Indo 
China. It's approximately sixteen 
square miles of island-enclosed na- 
tural harbor are choked with over 
12,000 foreign-flagged vessels mak- 
ing turnarounds annually. Fifty 
shipping companies handle its mas- 
sive tonnage and many-tongued 
passengers. 

Tourist bearing jets sidle like 
homing eagles between hilly green 
slopes to nose out the unique land- 
ing strip which Kai Tak Interna- 




A pearl in whose hands? 




tional airport juts on reclaimed 
land into the blue water. 

Disembarking shoppers race in 
taxis, rickshas and double-decker 
busses to exchange currency, rang- 
ing from Ceylonese rupees and 
Norwegian kroners to Thai bahts, 
into treasure buying Hongkong 
dollars. 

5000 vessels normally jam the 
chaotic, picturesque waterway. 
British ferries, crowded with 
Western-dressed Chinese commut- 
ers and exotic-costumed foreigners, 
snake through the maze of bell 
ringing, spiney sailed walla-walla 
water taxi junks, fog-horn voiced 
freighters from Liberia, Russia, 
Lebanon — you name it — and gray 
American war ships. 

The jangle of discordant sound 
blends into pungent harbor odors 
of smoke, spices and salt spray 
through which sure-footed fishing 




12 







kotos by betty raaey 



families in black pajamas man the 
junks that seem to be the cohe- 
sive substance that holds the seeth- 
ing seascape together. 

Wild tropical-green peaks over- 
look the cineramic view presented 
by the spectacular harbor as it 
separates, but also fuses, two of 
the biggest cities in the Orient — 
Kowloon, on the mainland, and 
Hongkong on one of 236 islands 
siding the harbor. Modern metro- 
polises of industry and commerce 
bursting with a combined four mil- 
lion Chinese residents, with a lib- 
eral sprinkling of British subjects 
and every other race and color, 
who have lived and worked to- 
gether in harmony for years. 

Or was it truce? A sign on the 
smoke stacks of ferries, written in 
both English and Chinese reads 
BEWARE OF PICKPOCKETS. 
The literal translation of the Chi- 



nese is BEWARE OF SMALL. 
BUSY HANDS. 

At night the harbor slows to a 
spangled setting for romance and 
intrigue. Viewed from a high- 
hung balcony, it is bewitching, like 
the exotic smell of jasmine. 

Stilled forests of masts, like 
flotsam, edge the dark but glowing 
water. Moving legs of light from 
windowed ferries make caterpillar- 
like crossings carrying ladies of 
romance, sailors and secret agents 
— except when Communist insti- 
gated maritime shutdowns squeeze 
the harbors pulsing juglar vein. 

A local radio program calls 
Hongkong "A pearl in your hand." 
But now whose hand? Is the dragon 
enclosing the harbor in a fist that 
will shut away its bright treasures 
from the people of the world? Will 
Kipling be proven right? I hope 
not. 

copyrighted 



13 



FM package boiler manufactured 
by employees of The Babcock & 
Wilcox Company's Wilmington, 
N.C. Works is being lifted aboard 
ship at Wilmington. The unit was 
one of tivo shipped to the Korean 
Nylon Co. at Taegu, South Korea. 
In the past 12 years, B&W has 
shipped more than 31,000 tons of 
package boilers and boiler com- 
ponents through Wilmington. 




Soilermakers of Wilmington 




Shown here is a line of package boilers being assembled at The Babcock & Wilcox Company's Wilming- 
ton Works. The compact, self-contained units man be shipped fully assembled by rail or truck. Some 700 
persons are employed at the Wilmington Works. 

B&W'S WILMINGTON WORKS 
IS PART OF A WORLD-WIDE 
OPERATION — Wilmington Works 
of The Babcock & Wilcox Company is 
only 16 years old, but it is an integral 
part of a world-wide operation that 
is marking its 100th anniversary in 
1967. 

The entire history of B&W at Wil- 
mington has been one of adaptation 
and growth. In 1952, the first B&W 
products made in North Carolina 
were shipped to nearby Urania, N.C. 
Since then components for some of 
the world's largest utility and indus- 
trial boilers have been fabricated at 
Wilmington. 

Currently, Wilmington Works is 
responsible for the manufacture of 
B&W's line of package boilers, com- 
pletely shop assembled units which 
are shipped to customers ready for 
service. 

Other basic products fabricated at 
Wilmington include Basic Oxygen 
Furnace Hoods, studded tubes and 
pipe, air heater tube sheets, mem- 
brane furnace wall tubes, casings, 
flues and ducts, dampers and expan- 
sion joints, small steam drums and 
headers. 

The ability of Wilmington Works 
to produce quality work on a rigid 
schedule has been a contributing fac- 
tor in B&W's business upswing and 
has helped the Company keep pace 
with customer demands for increased 
power. 

Most of the original employees 
were engaged in manufacturing dur- 





JOHN J. McDERMOTT 
Works Manager, Wilmington. N. C. 

ing the War and the transition to 
boiler fabrication was not difficult. 

Wilmington employees not only ex- 
hibit pride in their work, but they 
have demonstrated their pride in 
Wilmington and surrounding com- 
munities. Many hold responsible civic 
and service positions and the entire 
staff has given strong support to the 
local United Fund and other fund- 
raising drives. 

Over the years, The Babcock & 
Wilcox Company has pioneered many 
of the developments which have paced 
the steam generating industry. Fu- 
ture developments will provide oppor- 
tunities to assure continuing growth 
for B&W and its Wilmington Works. 



Your symbol for 

banking in the 

growing port cities 




FIRST-CITIZENS BANK 

the Can-Do Bank with the Can-Do People! 

In Morehead City, Wilmington and other tine North Carolina Communities ■ CAPITAL AND SURPLUS: OVER $27,000,000 ■ Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 




SALVESEN LINES TO SERVE WILMINGTON 

In 1965, Nedlloyd Lines Inc. in New York were appointed General Agents for the United States and Canada and 
from that time on, Salvesen Lines have maintained regular liner service between Great Lakes /St. Lawrence ports and 
mainports on the Continent, such as Rotterdam, Antwerp and Le Havre. 

Mr. J. van Baarle, Executive Vice President of Nedlloyd Lines Inc. in New York, on behalf of Owners, made a 
survey of the situation calling for a Seaboard service. As a result of which the following routing was worked out: Rot- 
terdam /Antwerp /Le Havre to New York/ WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA /Baltimore. During a discussion with 
our Ports Authority officials, Mr. van Baarle stated that Wilmington, N.C. had been elected for a number of reasons, 
primarily because it was the consensus of Owners and Geneeral Agents, that the State of North Carolina has shown a 
great potential for expansion of industry and that there is every reason to believe that imports and exports will continue 
to increase in volume. 

Mr. van Baarle further expressed as his point of view, that there appeared to be a definite need for regular 
service between Wilmington and Rotterdam/Antwerp/Le Havre and vice-versa where Salvesen vessels will soon offer a 
transit time of 14 days (Wilmington /Rotterdam and Le Havre /Wilmington). 

First sailing will be performed by the M. S. "SALMELA" scheduled to sail from Antwerp on November 4th, Le 
Havre November 7th, thence New York November 16 /19th, Wilmington, N.C. November 21 /22nd, Baltimore November 
23 /26th, for subsequent arrival Rotterdam December 6th, Antwerp December 8th and he Havre December 14th. 

In Wilmington, N. C, the port agency has been entrusted to Waters Shipping Company, whereas stevedoring of the 
Salvesen vessels will be handled by Heide Company Inc. 

During his recent visit to Wilmington, N. C, Mr. van Baarle indicated that he has a very favorable impres- 
sion, also, of the efficiency of the North Carolina State Ports Authority and of the shipping fraternity, all of whom 
appear intent to do everything in their power to promote the interests of the city and the State, to which SALVESEN 
LINES hope to contribute their share. 



NCMCA Board of Directors 




BOARD OF DIRECTORS of the North Carolina Motor Carriers Association take oath of 



Pinehurst before State Treasurer Edwin 



Elected to succeed Marvin Koonce of Raleigh was William L. Nahrgany (inset) of Charlotte. Nahrgang is President of Johnson Motor Lines 
System. Elected 1st V.-Pres. is T. Bragg McLeod of Charlotte; 2nd V.-Pres., Carl E. Anderson; . J. T. Outlaw of Raleigh was re-elected Exec. 
V.-Pres.-Treas. North Carolina Vice-President for American Truckers Association is R. Y. Sharpe of Wivston-Salem. 

16 



STEAMSHIP & FORWARDING AGENTS 




PHONE 919 726-6173 
FMC #1079 



TWX 919 530-2972 
CABLE "DAVIES" 



AGENTS FOR HAMBURG AMERICAN/NORTH GERMAN LLOYD LINES 






W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Manager — Export Dept. 



WADE H. PIERCE JESSE C. JACOBS 

Manager — Import Dept. Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 

Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 




BARBER 



LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Bottcry Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



EXPORTUNITIES 



^^O 



LEADS 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

or 
Edward L. Mercaldo 
Dept. of C. & D. 
Raleigh. N. C. 



Structural Clay Products 

South Africa — All types of ceramic, wall, floor tiles. 



Fruits, Tree Nuts, Vegetables 

Venezuela — Fresh peaches, apples, pears, prunes, 
plums. 

Meat Products 

Trinidad, W.I. — Frozen meats. 

Grain Mill Products 

Malaysia — Poultry feed concentrates. 

Food Preparations 

Australia — Soybean meal. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Manmade Fiber, Silk 

France — Synthetic fabrics for manufacture of 
ready-to-wear men's clothing. 

Yarn, Thread Mills, Products 

Germany— Finished yarns for industrial use, man- 
made fibers of polyester, polyamide, triacetate. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings, Work Clothing 

France — Men's separate trousers, men's sport trous- 
ers, men's shirts. 

Agricultural Chemicals 

Malaysia — Insecticidal, pesticidal and fungicidal 
preparations for use in vegetable farms, tea planta- 
tions. 

Glass Products 

France — Art glass, artificial flowers, foliage, fruits ; 
Christmas tree ornaments; decorated glassware; 
etched and ornamented glass; table tops. 



Cutlery, Hand Tools, General Hardware 

South Africa — All types of decorative cabinet and 
door hardware; porcelain, crystal, brass, metal. 

Heating Apparatus, Plumbing Fixtures 

Switzerland — Plumbing fixture fittings, trim. 

Metal Stampings 

Switzerland — Institutional cooking and frying pans, 
kitchenware for hotels, restaurants. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Dominican Republic — Shoe making and repairing 
machinery, parts. 

Germany — Cloth cutting machinery and textile 
welding machinery. 

Electric Transmission, Distribution Equipment 

Sweden — Electrical material included in high and 
low tension switch board controls; electric automatic 
control equipment; electric switching equipment. 

Electrical Industrial Apparatus 

France — Small electric motors, motor products of 
standard international types, including rotary ma- 
chines, miniature A.C. and D.C. motors for marine, 
aviation, industrial, other uses. 

Aircraft, Parts 

Germany — Hydraulic aircraft parts. 

Surgical, Medical Instruments, Dental Instruments 

Colombia — Surgical instruments, apparatus. 

Costume Jewelry, Novelties, Buttons, Notions 

Malaysia — Costume jewelry, novelties, ornaments. 



18 




How do you go around the world on paper? 

That's a problem you deal with every day. 

Your international business operation depends on 

paperwork: commercial letters of credit, acceptance 

financing, credit information, shipping documents. 

Wachovia's International Department can help you 

fulfill all your foreign obligations with ease. 

We can channel your requirements through banks in 

over 100 countries. And you are assured that men 

who specialize in world-wide banking 

are handling your needs all the way. 

To find out how Wachovia's International Department 

can take your business abroad with flying colors, 

write or phone our Winston-Salem office. 

Do it today. 



International Department 

WACHOVIA 




STATE PORT TERMINAL. 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous 
marginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 
feet of water alongside at mean low water 
(channel project now being deepened to 38 
feet) capable of working seven vessels simul- 
taneously. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring 
dolphins, supported by tank farm and available 
undeveloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, mod- 
ern, concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 
506,000 square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as 
other open areas between sheds and at ends of 
wharf, backed up by 13 acres of paved open 
storage accessible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500,000 square feet, fully 
sprinklered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space 
available by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240,000 square 
feet, open ends, concrete and steel, paved build- 
ing, equipped with overhead bridge cranes and 
served by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification 
and Value Section, located on terminal prop- 
erty. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car 
scale conveniently located on terminal. Certi- 
fied weighmasters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs along full length of wharf apron. De- 
pressed tracks serving rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Storage yard capacity — 370 rail 
cars. (Four diesel switching engines operated 
by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT : Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
used singly or in tandem; also equipped for 
80-inch magnet and two or six-yard bucket op- 
erations. A third crane operational 1968 — 75 
tons at 70 foot radius. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of 
various capacities with accessories — cotton and 
paper clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5- 
ton mobile crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top rail- 
cars possible by prior arrangement. Rail and 
truck docks for loading and unloading at tran- 
sit sheds and warehouses; ramps for easy 
access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with 
two large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany plus numerous highway motor carriers. 
Locally domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships 
Agents, Customs Brokers, and Freight For- 
warders. 

SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental 
buildings available to private enterprise for 
specialized purposes. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Booting Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 





A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Sou t hport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45- 
foot apron. Berth six 500-foot cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square 
feet. Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one 
of metal. All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, 
totaling 556,000 square feet, sprinklered with 
deluge systems. Total 30 fire segregation sec- 
tions. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage are available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 
track full length rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities 



for full palletization cargoes. Tractors and 
trailers. Berths 6 and 7 designed for two 75-ton 
gantry cranes operational 1968. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage 
and shipment of bulk cargoes now under con- 
struction. Completion date 1968. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading or unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; easy access into transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum cyanide and acritet fumigation facilities. 
Two 9,000 cubic foot steel chambers, fully 
mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC 
Railway system and the Beaufort-Morehead 
Railroad plus numerous highway motor car- 
riers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

\ ■ SS. 




"We Invite You to -visit our 



new Beaufort Office, meet 



our personnel, send give us sen 



opportunity to serve you. 



North Carolina 's Oldest Bank 



Branch 

BANKING ATRU ST COMPANY 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



r 



"\ 



D 



RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



7865 



707 
Years - 1966 
Now 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 



MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 23 

PArk 6-5300 

New Orleans 12, La. 

Corondelet Building 

JAckion 5-I1M 



Baltimore 2, Md. 

Mercantile Trust Building 

SAratoga 7-6936 

Norfolk 10, Va. 

109 W. Main Street 
Phone: 625-4512 



Now York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
Whitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. Lkente No. 4B1 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY INC. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Ageirtt 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 
■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

G. D. Zealand, Executive Director 

Drawer B 919-728-31 15 

Beaufort, N. C. Courthouse Annex 



23 



INDUSTRY 



AT ITS BEST I 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year Wound mild climate. Churches, Schools. 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Lond-Seo-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 
County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



T 



\^ WITH 
RTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island — Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leory, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Wmter & Market Sti. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 

Color Block & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. 919-392-3171 

Charlotte, N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bliln. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldo. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolino Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

St ATE HEADOUAtTEIS. TRUCKING BUIIDING, IaLEICm 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Traffic Manager 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Mgr. -Export Dept. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Branch Office: Charlotte. \. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



PAID 

BoUigh N C 



At Heide 

we believe in 

Friendly People 



like 



Friendly Freight Forwarders 
Friendly Customers 
Friendly Shipowners 
Friendly Bankers 
Friendly Truckers 



Friendly Receivers 
Friendly Labor Leaders 
Friendly Lawyers 
Friendly Competitors 
and... 



Chief Running Water 

He's From the Cherokee Tribe 
and Happily, He's A Friendly Indian 



HEIDE COMPANY, INC. 

Founded 1869 

(A LUCKENBACH COMPANY) 




WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



TOTE PORTS 



North Cl I bbtvy 

Raleigh 



Doc. 



13/4 



k 








01 AMONO 



t 



/ 



WINTER 1968 





i W — 



j i 









How do you go around the world on paper? 

That's a problem you deal with every day. 

Your international business operation depends on 

paperwork: commercial letters of credit, acceptance 

financing, credit information, shipping documents. 

Wachovia's International Department can help you 

fulfill all your foreign obligations with ease. 

We can channel your requirements through banks in 

over 100 countries. And you are assured that men 

who specialize in world-wide banking 

are handling your needs all the way. 

To find out how Wachovia's International Department 

can take your business abroad with flying colors, 

write or phone our Winston-Salem office. 

Do it today. 



International Department 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



Cape Fear 
Warehouse 



P. O. Box 3662 — Zip Code 28401 
Near Shipside Wilmington, N. C. 



Computer Available 



North Carolina State Ports Authority 
Buildings 1 & 2 
Telephone 762-0408 




MX 



.fiu 




e^ 



UA<VU4J 



Hunting for the best way to ship freight 
to, from and within the South? You can 
now rest easy. You've found it. South- 
ern. Try us and see. 

SOUTHERN 

RAILWAY SYSTEM 

"Southern's Accent is on YOU!" 



r 



D 



RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



TRTE PORTS 



«t 



99 



Cover 
. i Schooner 
Wrecks 
off 

Bermuda 

TRAGEDY HAS struck the yacht, Ramona, 
tvhich tvas pictured in a watercolor on the cover 
of State Poi-ts magazine this fall. The watercolor 
was by Charles McNeill, artist of Morehead City 
and operations manager at Morehead City port. 

The Ramona, a 135-foot schooner, snagged Sun- 
day on a reef seven miles off Bermuda. Five died 
in the mishap and five were rescued. 

The Ramona, in Mr. McNeill's painting, is pic- 
tured in the bight at Cape Lookout. He painted 
the scene early in September when the owner and 
skipper, Capt. G. Walter Boudreau, was taking 
the schooner to Lunenberg, Nova Scotia, to have 
another mast added. 

THE RAMON A' S disaster was learned of here 
when Tom Lindtvit, resident engineer on the phos- 
phate facility under construction at the port, 
spotted an AP Wirephoto of the schooner in his 
Dec. k hometown paper, News Day, Long Island. 

He showed the picture to Mr. McNeill, who 
identified it as the Ramona, with its new third 
mast. 

Mr. McNeill said, "She was evidently on her 
way to her home port, St. Lucia, after having the 
work done on her at Lunenberg." The photo shows 
the Ramona heeled over at a U5 degree angle. 

CAPTAIN BOUDREAU had his five children 
with him aboard the Ramona when it was at Cape 
Lookout. His wife, who's maiden name was Mc- 
Neill, had flown on to Nova Scotia, her home. 
There were about 10 West Indian lads in the 
Rainona's crew, Mr. McNeill recalls. Her main- 
mast was 110 feet. 

Lunenberg is one of the few ports in the world 
where craftsmen are skilled in building and rig- 
ging schooners. The replica of the Bounty, used 
in the film, Mutiny on the Bounty, was built there, 
as were replicas of the America and the Gloucester 
schooner, Blue Nose. 

Captain Boudreau and his family, Canadians, 
have been living in St. Lucia in the Caribbean, 
since 1958. From there they operate luxury yachts 
on charter. carteret county 

NEWS TIMES 
Morehead City, N. C. 




Charles McNeill, manager of the Morehead City Port Terminal, presents a silver wine cooler to T. 
Akai, captain of the K Line vessel, SS Spain Maru, which visited the port Saturday on her maiden 
voyage to pick up hogsheds of tobacco for Japan.' The wine cooler was a gift from the North Carolina 
State Ports Authority. Looking on is Morehead City Mayor George W. Dill Jr. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NEWS TIMES 
Morehead City, N. C. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines . 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad __„ 24 

Cape Fear Warehouse, Inc. 1 

Carteret County 23 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. .. 24 

Colorcraft Studios Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

Exporters Encyclopedia (D&B) 22 

Heide Company-Luckenbach .22 

Heide Company ..Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line ...... ._.. --23 

Morehead City Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc. 23 

New Hanover County 24 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. .... Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co. 22 

North Carolina National Bank 19 

Ryan Stevedoring Co. r 1 

Southern Railway System 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 22 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co. . 17 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. . I 23 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

I. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
URKWOOI) ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
.. R. BOWERS, Whiteville 
V. B. GLENN, Greenville 
,AMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
VILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
iEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville, V.Chm. 
•'. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Exec. Com. 
I L. WEATHERS, Shelby 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



R. A. Di'.VANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

'.. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce & Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

HVC.H HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Bulk Facility 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE POITS 



2 



WINTER ISSUE, 1968, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 12, NO. 4 



CONTENTS 



These Men=Ports Authority=Progress 

Phosphate Facility Nears Completion 

Down the Historyland Trail 

Harbors of Japan 

From Trash to Jewels 

Ammunition Movers 

Container Cars 

Exportunities 



Page 
4 
6 



10 
13 
14 
16 

18 



In this issue we present for the second time a continuing feature 
called, "Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is 
being written for us by Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. 
Mrs. Casey has spent many years traveling, particularly in the orient 
and the south seas. The second feature is on Yokohama. (See Pages 
10 and 11). 

Photo Credits should be given to: Hugh Morton of Wilmington and 
Grandfather Mountain, Bob Simpson, Morchead City, Tom Lindtvit, 
Morehead City, Babcock & Wilcox, J.M.C., Ken Cooke. 



STATE PORTS 




COVER STORY 



This month's cover shows large 
package boilers being loaded on board 
a vessel bound for South America. 
This typical dock scene at Wilming- 
ton is placed in this issue in a cover 
position because of the heavy lift 
capacity now being added to the 
Wilmington Terminal. The gantry 
cranes visible here lift 45-tons each, 
for a total single lift of 90 tons when 
used in tandem. The 75-ton crane, 
soon to be added to the Wilmington 
wharf, will give a maximum lift total 
of 120 tons. 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



These Men = Ports Authority = Progress 

1957 — 1967 



On these pages are photographs taken 
from our files of the men who have 
served on the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority at the pleasure of three 
Governors over the past decade. 

These men are responsible, more than 
anyone else, for the progress and the 
momentum of the present day Ports 
Authority. Under the leadership of 
Chairman John M. Reeves, who served 
from 1957 to 1966, the tremendous ex- 
pansion of the Ports Authority fulfilled 
its planning stage and was well under 
construction. 

In 1961 E. N. Richards became a mem- 
ber of the Authority, and immediately 
his dynamic influence made itself known. 
In June, 1962, the then Director Wil- 
liams died in office and Richards acted 
as interim Director, by unanimous con- 
sent of the Board. The present Executive 
Director, James W. Davis, was employed 
in January, 1963. Richards became Vice- 
Chairman in 1965, and in 1966 Reeves 
resigned wanting to retire from public 
life. Richards was then elevated to the 
Chairmanship with Henry L. Weathers, 
prominent publisher and entrepeneur, 
of Shelby, appointed by Governor Moore 
in 1965, as Vice Chairman. 

The Ports Authority reached its de- 
cision to rotate the Vice-Chairmanship 
at its Annual Meeting in 1967, and today 
George Purvis serves as Vice-Chairman. 
Mr. Purvis is from Fayetteville. He was 
appointed by Governor Moore in 1965. 
He is a prominent sales executive in 
automobiles and has other interests. 

Two men currently serving terms on 
the Ports Authority have completed 
other terms. The first of these is Kirk- 
wood Adams, who was appointed by 
Governor Moore in 1967, after having 
served under Governor Hodges from 
1957 to 1961. W. J. Pharr was appointed 
by Governor Sanford in 1961 and re- 
appointed by Governor Moore in 1967. 

Now beginning in 1957, here is a brief 
biographical sketch of each one: 

Former Chairman Reeves is Chairman 
of the Board of Reeves Brothers Com- 
pany. He has served as chairman of the 
Board of Trustees of American Univer- 
sity of Washington, D. C, on the Board 
of Methodist College in Fayetteville, and 
numerous other high level appointive 
positions too numerous to mention. 

Vice-Chairman W. J. Clark of the 
1957 Board is a banker from Tarboro, 
N. C, a farmer and an insurance execu- 
tive. A member of one of the most prom- 
inent families in eastern North Caro- 
lina. He was re-appointed by Governor 
Sanford in 1961 and served until 1965. 



General of the Army Eichelberger, of 
World War II fame, was appointed by 
Governor Hodges in 1957 from the Ashe- 
ville area, and served until 1960, when 
he retired and subsequently passed away 
a few months later. 

Earl Phillips of High Point was ap- 
pointed by Governor Hodges. He is an 
executive of Phillips-Davis Corporation, 
High Point, and Chairman of the Board 
of Hatteras Yacht Company. Mr. Phillips 
is an outstanding man of the business 
community and continues to be actively 
interested in the Ports Authority and 
its planning. 

Collier Cobb, Jr. of Chapel Hill, in- 
vestment banker and insurance execu- 
tive, served from 1957 to 1961, and is 
very much interested in the activities 
and the development of the Ports 
Authority in the business community. 

Harvey Hines of Kinston was ap- 
pointed by Hodges in 1959, served until 
1961. He is a Coca Cola executive, and 
an outstanding member of the business 
community of eastern North Carolina. 

The late Tom Evins of Oxford, a to- 
bacco company executive, also served 
from 1959 until 1961, when the Board 
was enlarged from seven to nine men 
under the leadership of Governor 
Hodges. 

Charles D. Gray of Gastonia was 
appointed by Governor Hodges. He is 
an outstanding textile executive of the 
piedmont area. He served until 1961. 

Kirkwood Adams, mentioned above, 
is serving his second term. He is a paper 
manufacturing representative from Roa- 
noke Rapids. He is an expert in trans- 
portation. 

In 1961 Terry Sanford was Governor 
of North Carolina. One of his first pre- 
vious appointed positions, under Gover- 
nor Kerr Scott, was as Secretary and 
Treasurer of the Ports Authority. He 
selected L. S. Ficklen, tobacco executive 
of Greenville, N. C; Cooper D. Cass, 
office equipment sales executive of 
Winston-Salem; Joseph 0. Foil, a textile 
executive of Greensboro; James Latham, 
an attorney of Burlington; E. G. An- 
derson, a tobacco executive of Roberson- 
ville; E. N. Richards, as mentioned 
above, and W. J. Pharr, as mentioned 
above. 

In 1963 Latham resigned to become 
a Superior Court Judge appointed by 
Governor Sanford, and he was replaced 
by F. H. Ross, who is today a Member 
of the Executive Committee. He has 
been one of the work horses of the cur- 
rent Ports Authority. Mr. Ross, from 
Charlotte, is a distributor of chemicals 
and supplies to the textile, laundry and 
dry cleaning industry. 



In 1965, in addition to Purvis and 
Weathers, Mr. W. B. Glenn of Green- 
ville, a tobacco executive, replaced Mr. 
Ficklen, Weathers and Purvis having 
replaced Mr. Cass and Mr. Clark, whose 
terms had expired. Mr. Glenn is a promi- 
nent member of the Greenville, N. C. 
business community. He is also well con- 
nected in Winston-Salem, of which he 
is a native. He serves, in addition to 
being President of Carolina Leaf, as a 
Director in the Greenville, N. C. Branch 
of Wachovia Bank. 

In 1967 Mr. Anderson and Mr. Foil 
were replaced by Mr. Adams, as noted 
above, and Mr. L. R. Bowers, chief 
executive officer of the Bank of Wacca- 
maw of Whiteville came on the Board. 
The re-appointment of Mr. Pharr com- 
pleted the nine men who currently serve 
under Governor Dan Moore. 

Each one of these men has contributed 
a great deal to the total effort exerted 
by the Ports Authority, to the influence 
the Ports Authority has incurred in the 
Legislative Halls and in the general 
business community. Each one of the 
expansion programs have been conducted 
under the direct supervision and direc- 
tion of working committees of the Ports 
Authority and at all times the Ports 
Authority's Chairmen have been looking 
over the shoulder of its Executive Direc- 
tor and the professional staff. 

The Public Relations Office in Raleigh 
is attached to the Chairman and the 
Authority, and all policy statements are 
funneled through its office. The Author- 
ity has been careful to conduct the 
public's business in public, and the at- 
tention of the press, radio and TV has 
been sought at all times. 

Private enterprise is encouraged, and 
at no time has the Ports Authority con- 
sciously adopted a policy that would in 
any way interfere with the normal ac- 
tivities of any private enterprise. These 
policies, we think, have been the assur- 
ance of a successful activity. 

Now having shown the men who 
served as volunteer appointees of the 
Governor in command of the Authority, 
we here on these pages bring you an 
informal photograph of the men who 
serve as professionals, carrying out the 
policies and allied functions and opera- 
tions of the deepwater terminals at 
Morehead City and Wilmington, the 
sales promotion of cargo in New York 
and in Charlotte, and all over North 
Carolina. 

The names appear over the picture, 
their functions and addresses are listed 
on the masthead of the Magazine on 
Page 3. 




ay Adams Cobb Hodges Phillips 



Evins 
(deceased) 



Hines 



Clark Reeves Eichelberger 

(deceased) 




Standing — Anderson, Foil, Pharr, Latham, Cass, Ficklen, Clark, Richards; Seated — Sanford, Reeves, Williams (deceased) 




Reeves, Richards, Governor Moore Standing — Gudger, Anderson, Foil, Purvis, Ross; Seated- 

Weathers, Richards 



Glenn 



THE PROFESSIONAL STAFF— The entire executive staff of the Ports Authority met with the sales organization 
in Wilmington on January 21,. Here they are clockwise from Davis in center, back, Matthis, Jackson, Clark, Bruce, 
DeVane, Friederichs, Lee, Schmidt, Hardaway, Koszewski, Edmundson, Kahl, Larcombe. (FOR NAMES, ADDRESSES 
AND TITLES SEE PAGE 3, MASTHEAD) McNeill, hospitalized after accident was not present for picture (See p. 21) 




PHOSPHATE] FACILITY 









/'■ 





The newest member of the Ports Authority in point of 
service is L. R. Bowers, of Whitesville. He is not pic- 
tured on preceding pages but is shown here (fourth from 
left) with his son Vinson, Chairman E. N. Richards, Mrs. 
Bowers and Judge Raymond Mallard (far right) on the 
occasion of his oath taking in Raleigh. The Bowers re- 
side in their beautiful home at Whiteville where he oper- 
ates the Waccamaw Bank & Trust Co. in 18 communities. 



This group of waterfront operators gathered in Wilming- 
ton the other night (left to right): Bill Waters, Pres. 
Waters Shipping Co.; R. E. Barker, VP & Genl. Mgr., 
Heide Company; R. L. Otto, Pres., Cape Fear Warehouse 
Inc.; Joe Barefoot, VP, New Dixie Lines; A. S. Naples, 
VP, Cape Fear Whse. Inc.; E. E. Lee, Jr., NCSPA; L. L. 
Doss, Jr., VP, Wilmington Shipping Co. 
Mr. Otto, told them this about the Cape Fear Warehouse: 
"We have been in operation approximately two years tak- 
ing over some of the functions of the port's storage which 
were unprofitable to your organization due to the nature 
of the handling involved as our own endeavors with affili- 
ated companies have been in the field of small shipments 
unlike the normal handlings of any big organization, such 
as your own. 

We have a distinct advantage of being near ship-side at 
Wilmington, and we believe that this is a unique situation 
that does not exist at other Atlantic ports. 
We are interested in the handling of small lot shipments 
of any dry commodity irrespective of its nature and feel 
that with the establishment of a spot stock at Wilming- 
ton, that an importer would be more apt to use the port 
for his direct movements that did require warehousing." 




NEARS 




ION 





Harold L. Kahl, Superintendent 
of new phosphate facility. Has 
BS Degree in Mechanical Engi- 
neering from Montana State 
College. Married — has no 
children. He was a flying 2nd 
Lt. U. S. Air Force. Worked in 
Venezuela, South America as 
Supt. of Operations & Mainte- 
nance of Ore Handling Dept. 
of the Orinoco Mining Com- 
pany. 



Far East Steamship Services 







INBOUND- 


Wilmington — from Far East 


1 


NBOUND — Morehead City — from Far East 


LINE 




AGENT 


FREQUENCY 


PORTS OF CALL 


LINE 




AGENT 


FREQUENCY 


PORTS OF CALL 


China 


Merchants Heide 


Twice Monthly 


Yokohama, Kobe, Keelung, 


Moller Steomship 


Co. 


Heide 


Every 2 months 


Bangkok, Japon, Monila 










Kaohsiung 


Yamashita-Shinni 


ion 


Heide 


Irregular 


Japan 


Barber 




Waters 


Twice Monthly 


Manila, Hong Kong, Bangkok 
Singapore, Djarkarta 


Barber 




Waters 


Twice Monthly 


Manila, Hong Kong, Bangkok 
Singapore, Djarkarta 


Orient 


Overseas 


WilShipCo. 


Irregulor 


Manila, Hong Kong, Bangkok, 
Singapore, Port Swettenham 
Pcnang 


"K" 




MorShipCo, 


Irregular 


Bangkok, Keelung, Hong 
Kong, Kaohsiung, Manilo, 
Yokohama, Nagoyo, Kobe, 


"K" 




WilShipCo. 


Irregular 


Bangkok, Keelung, Hong 










Osoka 










Kong, Kaohsiung, Manila 


NYK 




MorShipCo. 


Irregular 


Yokohama, Nagoya, Kobe, 


"K" 




WiiShipCo. 


Once Monthly 


Kobe, Nagoya, Osoka, 










Osako 










Yokohama 


Mitsui OSK 




MorShipCo. 


Irregular 


Yokohomo, Nogoyo, Kobe, 


Japon 




WilShipCo. 


Once Monthly 


Hong Kong, Kobe, Nagoyo, 










Osaka 










Yokohama, Osaka 


Chino Union 




MorShipCo. 


Irregular 


Yokohama, Kobe, Keelung, 


China 


Union 


WiiShipCo. 


Once Monthly 


Yokohama, Kobe, Keelung, 










Kaohsiung, Osaka 


Mitsui 


OSK 


WilShipCo. 


Once Monthly 


Kaohsiung, Osaka 

Kobe, Nagoyo, Yokohomo, 




OUTBOUND- 


-Wilmington — to 


Far East 










Osoka 


Chtno Merchonts 




Heide 


Monthly 


Kobe, Keelung, Koohsiung, 


NYK 




WilShipCo. 


Monthly 


Yokohama, Nagoyo, Kobe, 










Nagoya, Yokohama, Shimizu 










Osoka 


Morchessini 




Heide 


Every 2 months 


Kobe. Keelung, Kaohsiung, 






OUTBOUND- 


-Morehead City— 


-to Far East 










Nagoyo, Yokohomo. Shimizu 
Hong Kong, Puson, Korea, 


Tokyo 


Shipping 


Co. Heide 


Irregular 


Inchon, Pusan, Korea, 
Yawata, Japan 


Maritime Co. of 








Manila 

Kobe, Keelung, Koohsiung, 












the Philippines 


Heide 


Irregular 


Nogoya, Yokohomo, Shimiiu 




















Masao, Philippines 












"K" 




W.IShipCo 


Irregular 


Yokohomo, Moji, Kobe, 
Nagoya, Shimuu 












Japan 




WMShipCo. 


Once Monthly 


Yokohomo, Moji, Kobe, 
Nagoya, Shimizu 












M.tsui OSK 




WilSh.pCo 


Once Monthly 


Moji, Kobe, Nagoya, 
Shimr2u, Yokohama 












China Union 




W.ISh.pCo 


Once Monthly 


Kobe, Nagoyo, Yokohomo. 
Hong Kong 




DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilborn 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and History 



Elizabethan Gardens - Roanoke Island 



You would not believe it, but there it is! A tiny 
bit of Old England in the New World and right 
where the sixteenth-century explorers tried so 
hard to plant a colony for Good Queen Bess. "It" 
is the Elizabethan Garden on Roanoke Island, the 
site of the ill-fated Lost Colony of Sir Walter 
Raleigh. 

There have been many hands working to perfect 
the Elizabethan Garden — collective hands like 
the Garden Club of North Carolina, the Roanoke 
Island Historical Association, the State Legisla- 
ture, the National Park Service, the North Caro- 
lina Society for the Preservation of Antiquities, 
North Carolina Lily Society, North Carolina 
Camellia Society, North Carolina Wild Flower 
Society and individual hands like those of Lord 
Evelyn Wrench, Mrs. Katherine Pendleton Ar- 
lington, Mrs. Charles Cannon, Mrs. Inglis 
Fletcher, Paul Green, Honorable and Mrs. John 
Hay Whitney and in particular the protective and 
productive hands of Louis Midgette, Superinten- 
dent of the Garden — so many hands that they 
can scarcely be counted. 

The Garden is a symbol — a tribute to a life 
and world that was left behind and yet remem- 
bered in the life and world that lay before those 
eager and apprehensive souls who tested the 
unknown and treacherous coast that is North 
Carolina. The Garden was an idea first, but it 
became a reality in 1951 when the Garden Club 
of North Carolina adopted it as a main project. 
Ten and one-half acres were leased from the 
Roanoke Island Historical Association and thou- 
sands of dollars were spent in creating the jewel- 
like pleasure garden amid the undergrowth that 
once covered the site. 

The geometrically designed walks in the two- 
acre formal garden, with carefully manicured 
hedges and plantings, create so perfectly the 
feeling of typical gardens of Tudor and Stuart 
England that one expects to meet a merry mon- 
arch, a flirtatious lady-in-waiting, or a dashing 
courtier along the pathways. Indeed one might if 
strolling there July 27, 1968!! On this Saturday 
afternoon, an entertainment will be presented 
in the Garden by members of "The Lost Colony" 



cast. This entertainment will take the form of a 
masque, a popular form of diversion in the time 
of Elizabeth I. As in her day, the masque will 
consist of music, dancing, and play-acting. As 
one strolls through the Elizabethan Garden one 
might come across the mummers in various 
beautiful natural settings afforded by the Garden, 
just as once was done for the Lady Queen, Eliza- 
beth herself. 

Adding elegance and charm to the Garden are 
several pieces of statuary, representing Diana, 
Venus, Apollo, and Zeus, which were part of a 
gift from former British Ambassador John Hay 
Whitney and Mrs. Whitney. The splendid foun- 
tains, beautifully carved marble birdbaths, the 
well-head, sun dials, benches, and other items 
contributed by the Whitneys and other donors 
add authenticity and artistic grace to the entire 
formal garden. 

One glistening marble maiden has a history as 
dramatic as that of the early colonists, except that 
her story has a happy ending. The lovely Virginia 
Dare, clad only in a drapery of fishnet and stand- 
ing erect with the white heron beside her, was 
carved in Rome in 1859 by Louise Lander, Salem, 
Massachusetts, sculptress. The ship which was 
bringing the statute to the United States was 
wrecked off the coast of Spain and the Carrara 
marble sank to a watery grave. 

Several years later the cargo of the ship was 
salvaged and Miss Lander bought back her statue 
and after restoring it, placed it on exhibit. The 
exhibit building caught fire but Virginia Dare 
escaped. 

In 1926 the statue was left to the State of North 
Carolina. First Virginia was placed in the Hall 
of History but was later sent to the basement. 
After other abortive efforts to situate the statue 
the National Park Service, not wishing to display 
it at the Waterside Theater, sent it to Chapel Hill 
to Paul Green, author of "The Lost Colony." 
Green recognized that it would be at home in the 
Garden. 

The Virginia Dare statue rests on a black 
marble base, beautifully but very logically, in the 



Garden. A planting of white lilies and red gerani- 
ums nestled in dwarf evergreen shrubs makes 
even lovelier this notable feature of the Garden. 
One has only to dream a little to believe that the 
legendary White Doe, now a young maiden, has 
wandered from the forest back to the site of her 
birth. 

But enough of marble maidens; what of the 
beds of pansies, gillyflowers, daisies, marigolds, 
lavender, and pinks? Oh, they are there, these 
fragrant and well-beloved components of the 
nosegays of yesteryear. The architects of the 
Garden, Umberto Innocenti and Richard K. Webel, 
planned carefully to utilize the existing terrain for 
this memorial to English colonists of the Eliza- 
bethan Age. These artists visualized a composite 
garden, using wild flowers and other indigenous 
material as well as later developments of horticul- 
ture specimens. By carefully planning the Garden 
presents an everchanging parade of bloom and 
color throughout the year. The terraces, the foun- 
tains, the Mount, and all of the physical features 
merely serve as the framework for the brilliant 
planting that is the Garden itself. 

From the moment one walks through the arched 
entrance of the Gate House, with its limestone 
replica of the arms of Henry VIII, the experience 
is a memorable one. 

Every hue and shade of the spectrum is caught 
in the landscape spreading before the hundreds of 



visitors who enjoy this gift of the Garden Club. 
The dark somber greens, the palest pinks, the 
intense reds of trees, shrubs, and plants are 
caught beneath the bright blue canopy that is the 
Carolina sky. 

And those of vision can people the Garden with 
Sir Richard Grenville, Sir Humphrey Gilbert, 
John White, Eleanor Dare and the baby Virginia, 
Ralph Lane, Armadas and Barlow — no longer 
shadowy figures recreated in cadenced drama. 
Items of historical interest are displayed in the 
Gate House. 

This symbolic Garden, so magnificently created 
and so generously given through the efforts of the 
Garden Club, is not a static finished gift. It is a 
gift that will endure, as the memory of the 
colonists has endured. 

Since the dream began in part with Inglis 
Fletcher, it is fitting that the inscription on the 
bronze plaque should be her words: 

"Down the centuries English women have built 
gardens to the glory of God, the beauty of the 
countryside and the comfort of their souls. 

"The women of the Garden Club of North Caro- 
lina, Inc. have planted this garden in memory of 
the valiant men and women who founded the 
first English colony. 

"From this hallowed ground on Roanoke Island, 
they walked away through the dark forest and 
into history." 




r* *•. 



£* 



ft* 



■..;**; i 




2nd in a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 

containing her impressions and highlights of her 
visits to the Harbors of the World. 



3CTfcltJftM& 



The Harbors of Nippon 



"Is Japan touched by a 'divine wind'?" 

The metamorphosis of Japan is a Horatio Alger story. 
The land of the rising Sun has emerged — through spec- 
tacular achievement — from underdeveloped semi-isola- 
tionism and wartime devastation to global leadership. It 
has become the foremost Asian nation of the 20th cen- 
tury. 

The country's entire coast-line seems to have evolved 
into one big, hungry-mouthed harbor. 

Yokohama, one of the two largest of Japan's many sea- 
ports, was opened to foreign trade in 1859 upon Japan's 
agreement with America's first envoy, Townsend Harris. 
Accommodations for foreigners were built at this excel- 
lent harbor near the entrance to Tokyo Bay. Merchant 
seamen left it with colorfully named bars like Seattle 
and Barbary Coast. 

It is now a truly international city whose cosmopolitan 
charm is complete with high rise buildings and sophisti- 
cated restaurants over-looking the busy harbor. Many 
foreigners live on the hilly heights above the town. 

With a total mooring capacity of 1,800,000 tons and ex- 
cellent facilities, the harbor's huge appetite is gorged by 
imports and eager tourists arriving from everywhere; 
and exports pouring out from the land. From just one of 
Japan's 6400 trading companies you can buy an atomic 
reactor, a shrimp cocktail, a billion dollars worth of iron 
ore, or one of 8000 other items. Their TV ad claims, "If 
anyone, anywhere in the world, wants to buy anything 
or sell anything, we are at his service." 

The world's largest ships, leviathan tankers from 
100,000 tons up to 210,000 tons, are turned out like rows 
of "kokeshi" dolls at Yokohama's new Isogo dockyards. 
Japan produced more than half of the world's ocean-going 
vessels last year. 

An efficient system of piece-work has cut production 
time from two years to seven months. Ships are con- 
structed in two halves, and 400 ton engines are built in 



movable 80 ton pieces, then assembled. 

At Yokohama, Japan's mammoth whaling factory ships 
bring in 1000 whales at once. Tremendous sheds are car- 
peted with the tuna catch and one market alone handles 
1,800 tons of fish daily. 

Yokohama-Tokyo is one great industrial complex — 
bathed in smog — steel production, cement, plastics, heavy 
oil, copper, synthetic fibers, textile products in general. 
The two cities are linked by a traffic problem which 
sometimes takes two-and-a-half hours to negotiate. By 
comparison, twelve dollars and ten minutes will get you a 
three minute telephone connection with the United States 
almost 5,000 miles away. 

Tokyo strikes newcomers like a whiplash. It is noisy, 
crowded, new and blaring. It is the Capital city, Japan's 
great fast beating heart. Through its arteries almost ten 
million of the country's noisy, busy, beauty-loving, polite, 
well-washed, vigorous and complicated populace surge in 
what seems to be mass confusion, making up the world's 
largest city. 

This handful of beautiful, damp, mountainous Pacific 
Islands, strung out roughly in the shape of a friendly 
dragon off the northeastern coast of Asia, offers seaweed 
breakfast food and rock n' roll to almost ninety-nine 
million industrious inhabitants, one-seventh the popula- 
tion of China. Japan has the highest literacy rate in the 
world. It's success story has sweeping world-wide signifi- 
cance. How did this come about? 

A "divine wind," originally signified by a typhoon 
which once destroyed Kublai Khan's attacking fleet, 
thereby saving Japan, seems to have come again to their 
rescue. 

Under the firm but considerate American occupation, 
the Japanese, with dignity, rebuilt their war-devastated 
country. Aided by $500 million American dollars, Ameri- 
can technicians, the stimulus of American machinery and 
a new Constitution exempting the budget from military 



v ~ SB fl ^ 







spending, these ambitious people used diligent iniative 
and creative ability to exploit advantages which occurred. 

Liberalization of world trade and development of world 
conflicts opened the way. Conditions regarded before 
WWII as unfavorable became advantageous for Japan. 
It's location was strategic when war needs of nearby 
Korea and the Vietnam conflict provided lucrative outlets. 

Synthetics replacing natural products used the labor 
force provided by a large, dense population which before 
had been an unemployment handicap. Cheap construction 
copying gave way to painstaking care for detail. This 
combined with the development of scientists and techni- 
cians made Japanese products more popular. 

For this increased trade, the small land area of a nar- 
row island country with four major islands, Hokkaido, 
Honshu, Kyusha and Shikoku, provides a double trans- 
portation advantage. Roads and railways parallelling 
long coast lines furnish ready transportation for large 
maritime transportation to good harbors. 

Japan is 1/20 the size of the U.S., larger than the 
United Kingdom and ten times the size of Holland. It is 
a land of natural disasters — typhoons, earthquakes and 
floods. 

Yet seasonally, the landscape has soft tones and misty 
air brightened by abrupt colors — a blossoming cherry or 
plum or wild camellia, set off by a vermillion "Torii," or 
shrine gate. 

The inland seacoast offers silver-blue inlets marked 
by scatterings of pine-topped islands, elliptical arrange- 
ments of fishing nets, and yellowish beds of seaweed. A 
diaphanous veil of green at low tide surmounts a golden 
haze of bamboo poles revealing a marvel of functional 
beauty. 

The bountiful sea is a major source of work and suste- 
nance. Each July, giant red and white fish, fashioned of 
bamboo covered with painted cloth are launched by Toya- 



hama fishermen to honor the Ocean Gods. Evidently, the 
Gods are pleased. 

Japan has nearly 400,000 fishing boats making good 
hauls of bream, mackerel, flounder and mullet off its 
shores. Heavy catches are made close inshore by dredging. 

Despite Formosan's reference to Japan as "East is 
West," the Japanese have retained much of their indi- 
vidualistic culture, adapting innovations to their own 
use. Beauty is fundamental. Nature is worshipped — but 
has been tamed. The beauty of Japan is a disciplined 
beauty, reflecting a disciplined people — disciplined and 
determined. 

The Japanese have induced oysters to produce lustrous 
pearls by the bagful. They teach cormorants to fish for 
them. Patiently trained dwarf plants display delicate 
"bonzai" art forms, and traditional kimonos are made of 
drip-dry fabrics. 

Japan's role in the future development of Asia is of 
crucial importance. 

Shigeru Yoshida, Japan's 88 year old elder statesman 
has said, ". . . as Japan's capacity expands so must its 
responsibilities ... it has emerged from a state of de- 
pendence to a position of extending assistance to develop- 
ing nations . . ." 

"In this age," declares Pearl Buck, ". . . the people of 
Japan have a unique opportunity, even a mission, to 
stand between the two halves of the world as interpreter 
and friend." 

Cherry blossom festivals in Japan are occasions for 
restoring fellowship with all men. An ancient Japanese 
poem by Issa says, 

"Under the blossoms 
Utter strangers 
Simply don't exist." 

It seems that the "divine wind" continues its drift 
across the land of cherry blossoms. 



11 



Japan -Agriculture -Trade Fair 



Before another issue, the U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture and twelve cooperating states who have a large 
stake in agriculture, will have completed a Japan-Ameri- 
can Agriculture Trade Fair in Tokyo. 

The purpose of the Trade Fair will be to highlight the 
demand and use of American manufactured food products 
in this populous area. As many of our readers well know, 
North Carolina is a great agricultural community. The 
spotlight in recent years in North Carolina, of course, 
has been on its industry expansion, but for years North 
Carolina has had a tremendous monetary stake in the 
production of food and foodstuffs. The North Carolina 
Department of Agriculture, with James Graham as its 
Commissioner and with Curtis Tarleton as Director of 
Marketing leading the way, have come up with a North 
Carolina exhibit for the Tokyo Fair. The Fair takes 
place in Tokyo in April, 1968. 

Twenty North Carolinians will be there during the 
period, including representatives of the Ports Authority 
and various and sundry exporting companies who are 
interested in the sale of food and food products and also 
the tobacco industry. A huge supermarket will be adja- 
cent to the Trade Mart area, and in this supermarket will 
be many of the products displayed in the various booths 
in the Trade Fair. The Japanese public will be allowed 
to shop in the market, and the entire Fair is being spon- 
sored by the U. S. Department of Agriculture in co- 
operation with Japan and its trading companies. 

All phases of North Carolina's agri-business community 
will be well represented, and the anticipation of those 
involved is that this will strengthen the United States 
and, particularly, the agricultural states export to the 
islands, helping to counter-balance the trade barriers 
pressure now being exerted in the Congress. 

In the opinions of most U. S. experts in world trade, 
imbalance in trade cannot be corrected by shrinkage of 
the market. About the only way to correct imbalances is 
enlarging of the market. This is the primary purpose of 
the Agricultural Trade Fair in Japan. 

For example, in 1967, November, a large shipment of 
the Dare soybean, a bean developed for the Japan market, 
left Morehead City. This may be a forerunner of larger 
shipments of other N. C. agricultural products to the 
islands. 




Congressman David Henderson, 3rd District, 
North Carolina 

"This special shipment of edible high quality 
soybeans in bags through the Morehead City Port 
is of interest to me, as I believe it might well lead 
to the establishment of permanent arrangements 
of this type in which a Japanese buyer purchases 
from an individual farmer or a large farm group 
in Eastern North Carolina soybeans of this qual- 
ity to be shipped from the Morehead City Port. 

I have worked for years with the State Port 
Authority, to help to promote use of the More- 
head City Port for shipment of poultry, tobacco, 
and other farm products to other countries and I 
hope that this special soybean shipment indicates 
a real breakthrough. 

I congratulate the North Carolina Soybean 
Producers Association the N. C. Department of 
Agriculture, and the Ports Authority. Also, the 
buyer and all others who helped in the endeavor." 




12 



From Trash to Jewels 
in Historical Adventures 



by: J. C. Knowles* 

What some persons consider trash, others find 
to be real jewels of historical adventures. A case 
in point is the recent find (in trash) of a diary 
belonging to a one Mr. Andren Boyd, of North 
Carolina, dated 1762. 

In November of 1763 our Mr. Boyd took a trip 
from New Castle, Delaware to Wilmington, 
North Carolina via ship. The following is a day 
by day account of his voyage. 
November 6, 1763, Sunday evening — went 
aboard the ship Rockbuck, Cap- 
tain Sam Smith, master. Then ly- 
ing at Glouster Point. 
November 7, in the evening dropped anchor be- 
low New Castle. 
November 8, saila with a bad wind to Ridey 

Isleland. Wind bound. 
November 9, went ashore, shot turkeys 
November 10, rain and easterly wind 
November 11, rain and easterly wind 
November 12, cleared the cape about meridian 
November 13, fair wind 
November 1U, saila past Cape Hattaras, N. E. 

wind 
November 15, past Cape Lookout Shoals, less 
than 8 fathons, 10 leagues from 
shore 
November 16, about meridian, S.W. wind beat 
us into the gulf stream. Here we 
were in great danger, the vessel 
wanting ballast and high seas 
lasted till 12 past meridian 
November 17, strong gailN. W ., 1 past meridian 
found no where 12 leagues to the 
south of the Frying Pan. U past 
meridian not 3 fathons water on 
the shoals and in a blowing wind, 
which very remarkably shifted in 
our favor. 
November 18, in the morning seen land, in the 
evening made the Cape Lay. Took 
U hours, could not get a pilot, 
stood out to sea. 
November 19, Six in the morning stood in for 
the harbor, lay too in the evening, 
three hours, then got a pilot to our 
masters satifaction, stood to sea 
that night. 
November 20, drop anchor at Fort Johnston, 
here went ashore and ivas very 
gently entertained by Robert 
Home, Esqr. 
November 21, wind bound 
November 22, saila up to Brunswick, wind bound 

that evening. 
November 23, hired a boat and U in the afternoon 

arrived at Wilmington. 
It took 17 days to complete the voyage from New 
Castle to Wilmington. At this point there is 
nothing written in the diary. It is with regret 
that Mr. Boyd did not keep a day by day account 
of his doings in Wilmington. He spent five months 






K/a jiff/, ,/., y . yt/gufi^/^/t/'U*-. 

tfil/ ,,„ ,.,/,.,. .,*./!<- /■/- /■—' 

... I // (Muiuiiwv f& /•*/*"/ V*y 
rfftflf. <*' fry ijLt* *tJ^t^ l /f <-/M~- 

JtAs thtUru^O/lf,^- jUut/rfflm/r,, 
a / :/rr/ d/..'/^ /^J^c^fAn/^, 



ft',/rr,-n+6r-> 



:,... ,/.../: „,.„■/.//. f jCJ!rfy 



in Wilmington and the diary picks up again on 
the day of his departure. 

April 20, 17 6U, left Wilmington about 3 in the 
afternoon and in the evening arrived 
at Brunswick, a distance freom Wil- 
mington, 5 leagues. 
April 21, at 11 before meridian went aboard the 
Sloop Endanor, Thomas Munford, mas- 
ter, and in 5 hours cleared the cape 
with a fair wind. 
April 22, clear sky and pretty good ivind 
April 23, clear sky and pretty good wind. 
April 2b, nine before meridian south of Cape 
Hattaras a stroyig wind right ahead, 
obliged to go 75 miles back, in the eve- 
ning dropped anchor in Cape look out. 
Here is a very fine harbor, on one side 
of the land, other side a high beach, 
which forms a harbor thus in which 
100 ships may ride at anchor. 
April 25, rain and high winds 
April 26, rain and high winds 
April 27, clear and pretty good wind, three past 
meridian, the breakers mast high, here 
our Boom tackle gave tvay, lay too 1 
hour, got it mended and underway. 
April 28, abend meridian to the east of Cape 
Hattras violent N.W. ivind, lasted U 
hours then calm. 
April 29, calms and squals which continued till 

May second. 
May U, about U past meridian entered bay 
May 5, bad ivind, dropped anchor by New Cas- 
tle. Six in the morning went ashore at 
Marcus Hook, there hired a horse and 
in the evening arrive at Philadelphia. 
This marked the end of our Mr. Boyd's trip to 
and from North Carolina. It is of interest to note 
that you would never have read this account of 
this voyage had I not recovered it from the trash. 
There is a moral to this tale. The general rule of 
thumb in dealing with what we may consider as 
trash should first be gone through by those who 
know what is trash and what are jewels in his- 
torical adventures. 



* J. C. is Executive Secretary of the North Carolina 
Academy of General Practice. He is also an authority on 
antiques and is in his terminology an "amateur" historian. 
He is also Director of a new organization in Raleigh 
called Historical Raleigh, Inc. 



13 




SUNNY POINT KEEPS 

THE AMMUNITION MOVING 




The modest sign, green with white 
letters, reads: 

U.S. ARMY 

HEADQUARTERS 

MILITARY OCEAN TERMINAL 

SUNNY POINT 

Sitting beside the highway south of 
Wilmington, five miles north of South- 
port, North Carolina, it designates the 
entrance to the isolated-by-design am- 
munition loading terminal of the Mili- 
tary Traffic Management and Terminal 
Service (MTMTS), located on the west 
bank of the Cape Fear River. 

The deceptive serenity of the sur- 
rounding countryside, however, belies 
the bustling activity within — which be- 
comes immediately apparent at the main 
gate of this modern terminal operating 
at peak capacity in support cf the Viet- 
nam operation, shipping a large per- 
centage of all ammunition from the 
United States for all the services. 

Trucks labeled "EXPLOSIVES" roll 
to the entrance of Sunny Point, where 
signs enforce stringent safety regula- 
tions with their message — 
NO SMOKING 

NO MATCHES NO LIGHTERS 

RESTRICTED AREA 

for safety inspection and authorization 

to proceed into holding areas prior to 

unloading their cargo of ammunition 



14 




into the holds of waiting ships at the 
wharves. 

A subordinate installation of the 
Eastern Area, MTMTS (EAMTMTS), 
under the command of Brigadier Gen- 
eral Arthur Hurow, USA, Sunny Point 
is the only active Army ammunition 
terminal in the United States specifically 
designed solely for the transfer of am- 
munition and explosive cargo from land 
to sea, or vice versa. 

Planning for the terminal began in 
1950, with its location picked for geo- 
graphical and topographical features, 
plus the availability of labor in the 
area. The plans called for the inclusion 
of the most modern safety precautions 
in the construction of the installation. 
Determination was also made that, in 
the interests of safety, the installation 
would serve only as a shipping and re- 
ceiving site, with no storage and receiv- 
ing of ammunition or explosives, except 
for short periods of time. 

To accomplish this, Headquarters, 
EAMTMTS, maintains records of cargo 
that has been offered, and when a suffici- 
ent amount has been generated for a 
destination, requests MSTSLANT to 
furnish a vessel to lift it. After receiv- 
ing confirmation of the date a vessel is 
to be on berth at the terminal, Head- 
quarters, EAMTMTS, notifies the origin 
shipping agencies to move the cargo to 



arrive at the terminal at about the same 
time as the vessel. With this type of 
coordination, vessel and cargo arrive 
simultaneously, facilitating loading and 
avoiding delays in the vessel departure 
and storage. 

Included in the safety design were the 
provision for revetments surrounding 
holding areas for both trucks and rail 
cars, and dispersal of these areas 
throughout the terminal proper. As an 
added precaution, an additional perma- 
nent easement to serve as a buffer zone 
surrounding the terminal was also 
planned. 

Construction of the terminal began in 
1952, and was completed in April of 
1955, with formal dedication in October 
of the same year. 

Its three identical wharves with flush 
and filled railroad tracks allow direct 
loading of ammunition from rail cars or 
tractor-trailers onto ships. 

Roads, fire lanes and railroad tracks 
lace the installation, with fire lanes per- 
mitting easy access to any portion, while 
roads and tracks carry truck and rail 
traffic to various locations throughout 
the terminal and to the wharves. 

Commanded by Colonel Archie B. 
Joyner, Jr., the terminal is principally 
operated by Civil Service personnel who 
perform the normal administrative and 
service functions, plus a small military 



complement in key positions. 

Loading and unloading are accom- 
plished by contracted longshoremen on 
an "as needed" basis. At the present 
time, from 12 to 15 gangs are used each 
day. 

Ammunition loading, is not the com- 
plete story of Sunny Point, for other 
cargo also flows through the terminal, 
bound for various portions of the globe. 

The workload constantly rises, forcing 
the work crews into six, and often seven- 
day weeks. The story is best told by 
statistics — from July 1966 through May 
1967, the total tonnage was 737,068, 
nearly double that of the entire previ- 
ous year. 

To enhance its capabilities for hand- 
ling cargo and personnel, Sunny Point, 
during early 1966, prepared its own LST 
landing site and has, during the past 
year and a half, handled 60 LST's from 
the strip. Used primarily for unit moves, 
the LST area has serviced both Army 
and Marine Corps organizations. 

Handling every type of ammunition 
and explosives current today, plus unit 
equipment for all types of contingencies, 
and justly proud of their contribution 
to the MTMTS mission of keeping our 
troops supplied wherever they may be, 
Sunny Point personnel will tell you — 
"You get it to us, and we'll get it afloat 
real quick." 



15 




There's plenty of muscle in properly designed and built cargo containers, Here five 20-foot units are coupled together to 
demonstrate the strength of their container frames and of the couplings. 

CTI-Container Transport International Inc. now offers its European customers special rail container cars. Shown below, the 
cars can accommodate a variety of containers, including those conforming to ISO standards (note front car). 




CTI Operating 

Fleet of 

Rail Container 

Cars in Europe 



CTI — Container Transport International Inc., which 
three years ago in a pioneering development launched the 
first railway container car in this country, is now operating 
a fleet of similar cars in Europe, according to Thomas G. 
Newman, company president. Mr. Newman noted that the 
chief advantage of the cars is that the containers on them 
travel tare-free. 

All the cars are matriculated in the European Rail Union 
and therefore may pass freely from one country to another. 

Mr. Newman said that the cars are designed to carry 
one 40-foot container, or two 20-footers, or a combination 
of small units whose combined length is less than 45-feet 
11-3/10-inches (13 meters). Heide Company of Wilming- 
ton and Morehead City represents CTI. 



16 




Left to right: Mr. W. H. Friederichs, Major Mauricio Aquiles Funes from San Salvador, El Salvador, Central America, Mr. Hugh 
Hardaway, Mr. Guido Armando Lucha also from San Salvador, and Mr. E. H. Fernandes. 



Salvadorians Complete Fuertos Amigos Program 



Two Salvadorian port officials completed five 
weeks of intensive operations training at the 
State Port Terminals in Wilmington in one of 
such programs to be arranged through the Puertos 
Amigos Program of the Organization of Ameri- 
can States and the American Association of Port 



Authorities. 

Wilmington Port personnel received the 
trainees enthusiastically. The gentlemen are : Mr. 
Mauricio Aquiles Funes and Mr. Guido Armando 
Lucha of San Salvador, El Salvador, Central 
America. 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 



L. M. WALLACE 

1 Export Traffic Mgr. 



WADE H. PIERCE JESSE C JACOBS 

Manager — Import Dept. Asst. Mfjr. — Import Dept. 

Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

N. C. State Docks 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 2708B 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

• 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES. INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Ploec 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No 6334 



Agent: Morchcod City and Wilmington, N. C 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 




LEADS 



FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



W 



Grain Mill Products 

Netherlands — Wheat flour, related products. 

Floor Covering Mills, Products 

Soiith Africa — Woven carpets, rugs. 

Yarn, Thread Mills, Products 

Morocco — Yarns, nylon, rayon, viscose, cotton. 

Men's, Youths', Boys' Furnishings, Work Clothing 

Netherlands — Cotton underwear for men, especially 
boxer shorts, T-shirts, briefs, athletic shirts. 

Sawmill, Planing Mills 

Germany — North Carolina pine, pitch pine, Oregon 
pine, rough. 

Industrial Chemicals 

Uruguay — Industrial chemicals, raw materials, spe- 
cialties for paint, rubber, plastics, glass, ceramics, 
tannery, cosmetic industries. 

Fabricated Rubber Products 

Netherlands — Medical and laboratory products. 

Plastic Products 

Netherlands — Transparent wrapping and packaging 
materials. 

Glass, Glassware 

South Africa — Glassware: exclusive tableware; art, 
decorative and novelty. 

Heating Apparatus, Plumbing Fixtures 

Germany — Oil burner parts, attachments, such as 
electric motors, high pressure pumps, nozzles, con- 
densers, ignition electrodes, ignition transformers, 
magnet valves and oil firing accessories. 

Farm Machinery 

France — Small garden tools and agricultural im- 
plements such as lawnmowers, hedge trimmers, rotary 
tillers, chain saws, garden cultivators, portable power 
sprayers. 



Construction, Mining, Materials Handling 
Machinery Equipment 

Uruguay — Lift trucks, 35, fork, other types, hy- 
draulic. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Australia — Equipment for irradiation sterilization 
of foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, other materials which 
can be so treated. 

Uruguay — Machinery for paint, rubber, plastics, 
glas, ceramics, tannery, cosmetic industries. 

Service Industry Machines 

Netherlands — Water purification equipment for 
swimming pools; car wash equipment; household 
water softeners. 

Electric Lighting, Wiring Equipment 

France — Electric lighting, wiring equipment, in- 
cluding lighting fixtures, electric installations, devices 
and accessories, supplied for residential, commercial, 
or industrial uses; 220 volts, 50-cycle D.C. 

Electronic Components, Accessories 

France — Electronic components, parts, accessories 
and supplies for industrial, commercial and special 
uses, including condensers, transistors, electron tubes, 
precision and sub-miniature devices, electronic switch 
modules, related lines suitable for utilization in 
France. 

Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments 

Netherlands — Medical, surgical instruments, acces- 
sories of all types. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

South Africa — Toys of special excellence. 



Antique, Secondhand Stores 

South Africa — Antique furniture, 
ings, and objects of art. 



home furnish- 



18 



■ 



A bank doesn't grow 

this fast by minding 

its own business. 



Growth of Resources 




Through Merger and De Novo Expansion 


of Southeast's Three 


Largest Banks 


1960 through 1966 




Growth in Resources 


(1960 = 100) 


180 


NCNB/ 


160 


/ / 


140 


/ / 


120 / 


.• Other Two 


100 / 




1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 


Sources: Year-end Statements of Condition. 



■ 






It grows this fast by helping other people with their business. 
And that's exactly what we do at NCNB. We've developed a 
full range of consumer services, including a variety of check- 
ing, savings, trust and loan programs. Recently, we went 
beyond conventional bank services with NCNB BankAmeri- 
card, the state's fastest-growing credit card plan. And we've 
made all these services available at 75 offices in 15 North 
Carolina cities. 

For businessmen, NCNB offers Commercial Checking 
Accounts, Payroll Services, Electronic Billing and Book- 
keeping, Freight Payment Plan and other services. Through 
the Bank Wire System and our National Division, we can 



serve business interests throughout the country. 

And we don't stop there. Our International Department, 
backed by total resources of $949 million and capital funds 
over $60 million, serves importers and exporters through 
letters of credit, acceptance financing, foreign collections and 
exchange and remittance of funds. 

So whether your business is next door at a branch bank 
or anywhere in the world, we can help you tend to it. Just ask 
the people who have helped us to get where we are today. 

North Carolina National Bank 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 
Federal Reserve System 



Burlington / Chapel Hill / Charlotte / Durham /Greensboro / High Point / Morganton / North Wilkesboro / Raleigh / Research Triangle / 
Statesville / Tarboro / Tryon / Wilmington / Winston-Salem 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous 
marginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 
feet of water alongside at mean low water 
(channel project now being deepened to 38 
feet) capable of working seven vessels simul- 
taneously. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring 
dolphins, supported by tank farm and available 
undeveloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, mod- 
ern, concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 
506,000 square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as 
other open areas between sheds and at ends of 
wharf, backed up by 13 acres of paved open 
storage accessible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500.000 square feet, fully 
sprinklered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space 
available by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240,000 square 
feet, open ends, concrete and steel, paved build- 
ing, equipped with overhead bridge cranes and 
served by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification 
and Value Section, located on terminal prop- 
erty. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car 
scale conveniently located on terminal. Certi- 
fied weighmasters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs along full length of wharf apron. De- 
pressed tracks serving rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Storage yard capacity — 370 rail 
cars. (Four diesel switching engines operated 
by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT : Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
used singly or in tandem; also equipped for 
80-inch magnet and two or six-yard bucket op- 
erations. A third crane operational 1968 — 75 
tons at 70 foot radius. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of 
various capacities with accessories — cotton and 
paper clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5- 
ton mobile crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top rail- 
cars possible by prior arrangement. Rail and 
truck docks for loading and unloading at tran- 
sit sheds and warehouses ; ramps for easy 
access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with 
two large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany plus numerous highway motor carriers. 
Locally domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships 
Agents, Customs Brokers, and Freight For- 
warders. 

SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental 
buildings available to private enterprise for 
specialized purposes. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



S0UTHP0RT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Sou^hport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 








STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45- 
foot apron. Berth six 500-foot cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square 
feet. Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one 
of metal. All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, 
totaling 556,000 square feet, sprinklered with 
deluge systems. Total 30 fire segregation sec- 
tions. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage are available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 
track full length rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities 



for full palletization cargoes. Tractors and 
trailers. Berths 6 and 7 designed for two 75-ton 
gantry cranes operational 1968. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage 
and shipment of bulk cargoes now under con- 
struction. Completion date 1968. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading or unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses ; easy access into transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum cyanide and acritet fumigation facilities. 
Two 9,000 cubic foot steel chambers, fully 
mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC 
Railway system and the Beaufort-Morehead 
Railroad plus numerous highway motor car- 
riers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Security force on dutv at all times. 




Elk 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P O Box 232 Tel: (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



The Competitive Edge 

If you sell or ship abroad, Dun's 
%££**" Exporters' Encyclopedia gives you 

the edge on competition . . . saves 
time and money. Covers 1 80 
WORLD MARKETS, TRADE REGU- 
LATIONS, SHIPPING DATA, MAR- 
KETING KNOW-HOW. Stay up-to-date with twice- 
monthly supplements plus a newsletter on market 
developments and trade possibilities. All for only S60 
for full calendar year. You need it! For your subscription 
call your local Dun & Bradstreet office or use coupon 
now! A DUN & BRADSTREET PUBLICATION 

Exporters' Encyclopedia 
P. 0. Box 3088, Grand Central Station 
New York, N.Y. 10017 

Please send 1968 Exporters' Encyclopedia plus twice- 
monthly newsletter and supplements. 
□ $60 check enclosed □ Bill me 

NAME & TITLE 

COMPANY 

ADDRESS 



CITY & STATE 
SIGNATURES 



ZIP_ 



AK 



-Stopping Ga. 

STEAMSHIP 
& 
FORWARDING AGENTS 



PHONE 919 - 726-6173 

CABLE "DAVIES" 
TWX 919 - 530-2972 

F. M. C. NO. 1079 



P. 0. BOX 650 • MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



22 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 
J 03 

J 865- Years- 1968 
Now 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. Baltimore, md. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-S300 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

412 Gravier Bldg. 
JAckson 5-8164 



221 E. Redwood Street 
SAratoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Gronby St. 
Suite 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



N.w York 4, N. Y. 

33 South William Stroot 

WHrtohall 4-9120 

r.M.C. Lkonto No. 4S1 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Japan, Singapore, Indonesia 



MAERSK LINE 



HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P. O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agent* 

67 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 
■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P. W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



INDUSTRY 



AT ITS BEST! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schoole, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



7 



W7 WITH 

CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operator* 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island — Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



24 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO» 2-4232 
Water A Market SU. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE ROger 3-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 91 9-762-6352 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. 919-392-3171 

Charlotte. N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Notional Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N. C. Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolina Ports. 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

SIATE HEADOUAITflS. TRUCKING IUU.OMC. IAUICH 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mcr. 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAUL JENKINS 

Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 919 255-2989 

Rranrh Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BUI* RATE 
U S Pottos* 

PAID 

BoUigh. N C 
••mti.1 No 37 



Itmayseemabit 
old"fashioned, 
but at Heide we 
still believe in 
service. 




Jason A. Luckenbach, age 7, shipbuilder 



HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 




mm 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



TOTE PORTS 



Norm Carolina ^;aie Horary 

Raleigh § N. C. 

Doc 




lEIJItllNliRiaaill ■ MMftM 



'i n i 



I M 



■ 



^■■1 ' 



cH^HLrs m*wi«. I4»| 



His 



North Carolina National Bank 

BankAmericard 



AUTHORIZED SIGNATURES 



GOOOTH.uf 00/00 B A C 

3tE 123 T5b 181 



(A credit card for hotels, 

restaurants, gasoline, 

car rentals, airline 

tickets and dozens of other 

things -even cash.) 



Hers 



North Carolina National Bank 

BankAmericard. 



Q$tfyuz &(ysC(f&u2. 



AUTHORIZED SIGNATURES 



WC OWENS 



GOOD THRU fc U 



0/00 BAC 



(A credit card for clothing, 

home furnishings, jewelry, 

garden equipment, cosmetics 

and dozens of other 

things- even cash.) 

BankAmenca Service Corporation, 1958, 1967 ® Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad .. 24 

Cape Fear Warehouse, Inc. — - 1 

Carteret County - -16 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc. 17 

Colorcraft Studios .Inside Back Cover 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler Inside Back Cover 

First Union National Bank 15 

First Citizens Bank 22 

Heide Company-Luckenbach 23 

Heide Company Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. ..Inside Back Cover 

Maersk Line 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co Inside Back Cover 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc 23 

New Hanover County _ 17 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn. Inside Back Cover 

N. C. Shipping Co ....17 

North Carolina National Bank Inside Front Cover 

Ryan Stevedoring Co. 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. ....19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 16 

Waters Shipping Co. Inside Back Cover 

Waterfront Services, Inc. 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co 16 

I ATA Wilmington Shipping Co _. ...24 

W. 0. Smith & Co., Inc. _ 23 



r 



Cape Fear 
Warehouse 

P. O Box 3662 — Zip Code 28401 
Near Shipside Wilmington, N. C. 

• • • 
Computer Available 



North Carolina State Ports Authority 
Buildings 1 & 2 
Telephone 762-0408 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Opera t ion 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 

A Proud Member of fhe Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



Bulk Facility-Dedication 




Governor Moore 



On August 2, 1968 — Governor Moore will dedicate the 
giant Bulk handling and 3,000 ton per hour "off loader." 
(see construction photos here) 

The construction is very near completion. Operations 
will start about July 1 and indications are that the phos- 
phate mines in nearby Beaufort County will use this 
facility to great advantage helping the industry, the port 
terminal, the area, and the farmers. 

Financed by the U.S. Department of Commerce's Eco- 
nomic Development Administration, secured with revenue 
bonds of the State Ports Authority and a minimum use con- 
tract of 1,000,000 tons annually with interim construction 
loans handled by local commercial banking, the negotiations 
and construction is a classic example of "government-indus- 
try cooperation" at both state and federal levels. 

Dedication ceremonies will be public and will be at the site 
at 2:00 P.M. 




Phosphate Storage Building interior with Bucket Wheel 
Reclaimer. 



Phospate Storage Building interior showing 
Traveling Hopper on Conveyor *6. 




Above, Gallery & Shiploading Tower looking S.W. 



Below, Transfer Tower & Motor Control Center. 

I, it 

\m\ 




AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
IKWOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
R. BOWERS, Whitevillc 
B. GLENN, Greenville 
MAR GUDGER, Aaheville 
LI .1 AM PHARR, i\I( Adi nville 
BRGE PURVIS, Eayctteville, V.Chm. 
|. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Exec. Com. 
L WEATHERS, Shelby 

WILMINGTON OEFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce <tr Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Trafjic 

IUCH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 

STATE PORTS 



2 



2 



SPRING ISSUE, 1968, SPA MAGAZINE 



Tf- 



VOI..J-*. NO I 



CONTENTS 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Bulk Facility 




WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERiCHS, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York 4, N. Y. 

Area Code 212 BOwling Green 9-1843 

RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 





Page 


Hulk Facility Dedication 


2 


Report on Japan 


4 


Pepsi-Cola Tarheel 


8 


i Carolina 1966 Exports 


9 


Historyland Trail 


10 


Land of "Mabuhay" 


12 


Exportunities 


18 




In this issue we present for the third time a continuing feature 
called, "Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is 
being written for us by Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. 
Mrs. Casey has spent many years traveling, particularly in the orient 
and the south seas. The third feature is on Manila. (Sec Pages 
12 and 13). 

Photo Credits should be given to: Bob Simpson, Morchead City, Tom 
Lindtvit, Morehcad City, Babcock & Wilcox, J.M.C., Ken Cooke, 
WRAL-TV, Philippine Tourist & Travel Association. 





The cover this issue is another 
Charles McNeill original water color. 
The artist was allowed to use a little 
symbolism here, which is indicated by 
the giant girders in the foreground. 
However, the main picture is a repro- 
duction from a "different angle of 
the almost completed bulk handling 
facility at the Morehead City State 
Port Terminal. 




For information about: 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce. Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine. 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 



"THE OLD AND THE NEW". 




In the foreground is an ancient Japanese Garden several hundred years old, and in the background is the new City of 
Tokyo looking toward the Akasaka District. Almost everything in sight, except the garden, has been built since T947. 

REPORT on JAPAN 

by L. C. Bruce 



The State Ports Authority is most 
interested in Japan because of the 
large volume of trade moving across 
State operated terminals now, between 
North Carolina and Japan, and be- 
cause of the increasing demand for 
North Carolina commodities and goods 
in the Japanese Market. 

Value of exports to Japan, now 
moving through N.C. Port terminals, 
makes that country the leading custo- 
mer of N. C. Ports. 

For these reasons when the oppor- 
tunity came to send a representative 
to Japan during the recent American 
Festival, a food and agriculture trade 
exhibition in April and we were fortu- 
nate to be chosen. 

Accompanied by many people from 
Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, New 
Mexico, Washington and Missouri, we 
arrived in Tokyo on April 6 to join 
other North Carolinians already there 
— representing Travel Promotion, De- 
partment of Agriculture, Export Man- 
agers, Soya Bean Producers, and Gov- 
ernor Dan K. Moore who with Mrs. 
Moore was to have been an honored 
guest of the Japan Tobacco Industry 
and who also was to have accompanied 
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Free- 



man and other Governors of Agri- 
cultural States on an inspection of 
potential markets for North Carolina 
and U. S. products. 

Governor and Mrs. Moore had to 
cancel their plans at the eleventh 
hour, so he was represented at func- 
tions on April 5, 7, and 8 by William 
F. Hensley, Asst. Director of the 
Department of Conservation and De- 
velopment, who was in Japan at the 
time promoting travel to North Caro- 
lina. Incidentally, according to Mr. 
Hensley, Japan now furnishes more 
travelers in U. S. A. than any country 
outside the western hemisphere. 

Also present in Tokyo were Mr. and 
Mrs. John Palmer. He is president 
of Tobacco Associates, Inc. his assist- 
ant Mr. Robert Minor, also Mr. and 
Mrs. Malcolm Seawell of Tobacco 
Exporters of the U.S. and former Tar 
Heels Dr. and Mrs. Hugh Kiger of 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 
Washington, D.C. 

Now, let me point up some of the 
changing and improving trade re- 
lations between the industrial and 
commercial world of Japan and the 
industrial and commercial world of 
North Carolina. 



To begin with, we are today only 
sixteen hours flying time via Chicago 
and Anchorage, Alaska from Tokyo. 
So almost half way around the world, 
and less than one day's journey, 
nestles an industrial nation with 
"USA-type get-up-and-go" in a cli- 
mate and landscape so similar to west- 
ern North Carolina that, if the Coastal 
Plain touched the mountains in North 
Carolina, our terrain would be exactly 
like theirs. 

Customs and the dress of the people 
have changed to such an extent that 
following a few days in Tokyo in the 
financial and trading district one is 
hardly conscious that he is observing 
oriental people. 

The Japanese are an ethnic group, 
who have been isolated, geographical- 
ly, until World War II, to the extent 
that they have developed a different 
culture from their neighbors, similar 
developments are noted in Western 
groups of people, such as the Scottish 
Highlanders. 

Motivation, of course, in the com- 
mercial and industrial life of Japan 
is one of survival. It is the age-old 
struggle of man everywhere to sur- 
vive against a supply of food and 





Mr. Takeo Shoji, President 
Japan Monopoly Corporation 



L. to r. at North Carolina luncheon H. 
Goto formerly of Raleigh now Tokyo, 
with Japan Monopoly Corp. Yoichi 
Sasaki Vice President, Japan Mono- 
poly Corporation — Mr. Sasaki visited 
North Carolina in 1967. 



L. to r.: Mr. R. Minato, Mr. Robert Minor, 
Mr. John Palmer, Mr. William Hensley, Mr. 
F. Hoshiko is Managing Director and Mr. 
Minato is Director of Export-Import De- 
partment of Japan Monopoly Corporation 
(Tobacco). 











r «- 



-'--. r~ 






Parking lot as seen from "bullet train" en route to Kyoto. 



Typical street scene from elevated street crossing on train fror 
Tokyo to Takasaki. 




water, which is always critical and 
could be disastrous. To stay ahead of 
this potential disaster, a fine trans- 
portation and distribution system has 
evolved, which counts as integral parts 
— ocean shipping on the one hand and 
rapid transit public land transporta- 
tion, such as railways, on the other. 
Without question, the railway opera- 
tors everywhere might learn a great 
deal from the passenger service of the 
Japan National Railway System. 

The famous bullet train, which 
travels from Tokyo to Osaka via Ky- 
oto, is a marvel of modern transpor- 
tation, with only two stops, and those 
for two minutes each to discharge 
and take on passengers in Kyoto and 
Nagoya. The speedometer in the buf- 
fet car registers at times 210 kilo- 
meters per hour, which translates into 
top speeds of 135 miles per hour, the 
train averaging 101 miles per hour 
for distances of over 320 miles. 

While speeding through railroad 
yards in such towns as Nagoya, Kyoto, 
Yokohama, Osaka, we noticed many 



modern transportation ideas. For in- 
stance, we saw a "K" Line unit train, 
composed of "K" Line containers. 

In Yokohama Harbor, we were the 
guest of Customs officials, and were 
treated with a motor launch's eye- 
view of the most formidable merchant 
ship in the world. This vessel recently 
launched and almost finished super 
tanker of 270,000 dead weight tons, 
is, until its big sister is launched 
(310,000 dwt) next year, the largest 
ship afloat. Her deck towers over the 
mast of a 10,000-ton merchantman, 
berthed nearby, and I recall markings 
on her hull indicating draft of 64 feet 
when loaded. 

What about trade with North Caro- 
lina? At the present time, Japan is 
probably the largest customer of the 
State of North Carolina. If not al- 
ready, it is fast becoming such. We 
tend to be more conscious, of course, of 
imports from Japan, because of the 
domestic competition. It is true that 
imports from any country compete 
with domestic industry, however, 



world trade, to be successful, must 
operate as "a two-way street." Im- 
ports tend to create export trade, com- 
munications and facilities to expedite 
either are the same. 

We have heard much talk recently 
about North Carolina soybeans going 
to Japan. It appears that Japan cre- 
ates a demand for soybeans by the use 
of soya sauce, eating the bean itself 
and using bean derivatives as food- 
stuffs; also they extract oil and meal 
from the bean for other purposes. 
Such is the extent of use that annually. 
we are told, Japan has an estimated 
deficit of 18 million bushels of soy- 
beans. At thirty-six bushels to a 
metric ton, this translates into 500.- 
000 metric tons, or 600,000 acres of 
soybeans at thirty bushels an acre. 
Somewhere in the world, potentially 
in the U. S. A., right here in North 
Carolina, someone can produce this 
crop of soybeans for the Japanese 
market each year. Unless North Caro- 
lina, the South or the Midwest, are 
able to meet this demand with an 
(Continued on page 1-i) 



Large Norwegian Liner Sails From Wilmington 



According to one account of the 
sailing of the M/S Sagafjord, 500 
passengers moved out of Wilming- 
ton State Port Terminal on the way 
to the Caribbean on April 5th. Re- 
ports are that the North Carolina 
State Ports personnel did a mag- 
nificent job in the face of unfore- 
seen difficulties. For example: On 
April 4th the untimely death of 
Dr. Martin Luther King occurred. 
The M/S Sagafjord was scheduled 
to leave at 4:00 p.m. April 5. 
Longshoremen, employees of privately owned companies handling the ship, stopped work at 2:00 

p.m. as a memorial to Dr. King. However, through combined efforts of many people, the ship was able 

to depart on schedule. 




Another First For 
The Port Of Wilmington 

On March 28th, another first was established at the 
Wilmington State Port Terminal. Two 75.5 ton boilers 
were loaded by the gear of the Hansa Line vessel 
FALKENFELS. These boilers, manufactured by the 
local plant of Babcock and Wilcox Company were des- 
tined for a chemical complex on the Persian Gulf. 

The Hansa Line, which serves Wilmington bi- 
monthly from the Mediterrean and outbound to the 
Persian Gulf, is known as the largest heavy lift fleet 
in the world. Vessels of this line can single lift with 
their own ship's gear, up to 550 tons. Hansa Line is 
represented at Wilmington by Waters Shipping Com- 
pany. 




BhbkSm ^■i 




Ports Authority Meets In Winston- Salem 

The North Carolina State Ports Authority held its It was a significant meeting for the State Ports 



regular bi-monthly meeting in Winston-Salem in 
March in the Board Room of the Wachovia Bank & 
Trust Company. This spacious building is reputedly 
the tallest building in North Carolina, towering over 
downtown Winston-Salem thirty-two stories. 



Authority because of the large number of shippers and 
world traders that were associated in two .satellite 
gatherings. The first — a reception at Hotel Robert E. 
Lee on the evening before, and the second — a Luncheon 
following the meeting on March 14th. 




BRUCE, JACKSON, GUDGER, BOWERS, WEATHERS, DAVIS, RICHARDS, GLENN, PURVIS, ROSS, PHARR, LEE, DeVANE 

WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION CHARLOTTE 




Out of State guests of the Ports Authority at Seminar were: I. to r. Mr. W. 
Lubbe, South Africa, Mr. Naokazu Okuda, Japan, Mr. J. A. Hardman, Great 
Britain, Mr. Erik Fiil, Denmark, Mr. Russell H. Davis, Jr., V. P., International 
Affairs Dept. National Association of Manufacturers, Mr. Edgar Kirk, 

L. to r. — Leon Moody, retiring president NCWTA, Raleigh, Mr. Phillip Ridley, Great Britain, Mr. Jean Fourcade, France, Mr. 

Russell H. Davis, Jr., Vice President International Willie Fritch, Germany, Mr. C. Gordon Radebaugh, Belgium, Mr. Helmut 

Affairs National Association of Manufacturers, Middleman, Germany, (not in picture but present), Mr. Antoni G. 0. Smit, 

Edgar Kirk, new president NCWTA. Netherlands, Mr. O. Biato, Brazil. 




Head Table: H. L. Weathers, State Ports Authority, of Shelby; Mrs. Weathers; Joel B. New, U. S. Department of Com- 
merce, Greensboro; Russell H. Davis, Speaker; Mrs. Edgar Kirk; Leon Moody, outgoing President, North Carolina World 
Trade Association; Mrs. Moody, C. R. Harris of Pneumafil and Mrs. Harris. 



Twelve Full Ounces - Tarheel 

Become Synonymous 



In Japan, the name "Pepsi-Cola" is synonymous 
with "Tarheel", and this was most surprising to visit- 
ing North Carolinians until the reason became 
apparent. 

Seventy-four years ago in New Bern, North Carolina 
the soft drink beverage "Pepsi-Cola" was born, ac- 
cording to a book entitled, "Twelve Full Ounces" by 
Milward W. Martin, which was presented to the State 
Ports Magazine in Tokyo by the President of Pepsi- 
Cola Japan, Ltd, Mr. Alan Pottasch. 

The original name, according to this book, was 
"Brad's Drink". The creator of Pepsi-Cola, a young 
pharmacist named Caleb D. Bradham, was the owner 
and operator of his own drug store in New Bern, on 
the corner of Middle and Pollock Streets. Born in a 
little town known as Chinquapin, North Carolina ; 
educated at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill, and with a medical background from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, he had taught school in New 
Bern and eventually became the owner of the local 
drug store in 1893. 

The new beverage, with which he experimented be- 
hind the fountain became known among his friends as 
"Brad's Drink, and on August 28, 1898 was officially 
named "Pepsi-Cola" by young Bradham himself. (See 
Cut). 

We had been in Tokyo about twenty-four hours when 
this tie-in with North Carolina was brought to our 
attention at a Luncheon given by Governor Moore (in 
absentia. I William F. Hensley of the Department of 
Conservation & Development represented Governor 
Moore and introduced President Pottasch of Pepsi- 
Cola to the Japanese Travel and Trade Press and 
members of the tobacco industry who were present. 

Appropriately, at a Greensboro meeting, the Travel 
Council of North Carolina, under the leadership of 
Mrs. Roland Potter of North Wilkesboro, had just two 
weeks previously presented the Pepsi-Cola Bottling 
Company of the United States with special recognition 



awards for contribution to the travel industry of 
North Carolina by a colorful series advertising the 
Tarheel State. 

There is a refrain in the traditional athletic "Fight 
Song" of the oldest state university in America at 
Chapel Hill which goes like this: "I'm a Tarheel Born 
and a Tarheel Bred." This refrain seems to have 
caught the attention of the people in Pepsi Cola all 
over the world. Surprisingly enough, many Japanese 
people are beginning to associate an American soft 
drink with the nickname "Tarheel" and the State of 
North Carolina. 

The use of two Tarheel symbols by this magazine 
has been the practice since 1960 — pointing out that 
Wilmington and Morehead City are Tarheel footprints 
overseas. Now comes Pepsi-Cola and this campaign 
followed by appearances of our Department of Agri- 
culture at the American Festival in Tokyo. The re- 
action should be pleasant to the North Carolina busi- 
ness man working on his first export attempt to Japan 
if he deals with people in Tokyo. 




L. to r. — George Anadale, Board Chairman of 
Pepsi-Cola (Japan), LTD. talks with his associ- 
ates Alan M. Pottasch, President and Katsuhiko 
Fujiyama, President of Beverage Distributors. 
On the occasion of the North Carolina luncheon. 



^EPSI - COLA INTtRNHTIONAL P ,-,,_, 




Left: Vern Strickland, WRAL-TV Raleigh from American Festival, Harume Island, Tokyo, Japan, right — Vern talks to 
modern Japan ladies in Pepsi Cola Booth at American Festival — note North Carolina on map in background. 



Exports fmm North Carolina 

All 50 States Shared in Exports of Manufactures in 1966 




ALASKA 








\ 






J • 




\ 




'OT, 








> "' h *^. 


■ . >ne>-- ,= r*^r 


l4 


\ 






Highlights 



April 1968 



Information on exports of manufactures is based on the Survey of the Origin of 
Exports of Manufactured Products 1966, Series: MA-16K66I-1 (Rev.), issued by the 
Bureau of the Census on January 17, 1968. 



# 



► Exporters in the State of North Carolina sold an estimated $600 million of manufactured goods to 
foreign markets in 1966. North Carolina ranked thirteenth among the states in the value of manufac- 
tured exports. 

► North Carolina's exports represented 2.8% of the $21.3 billion total U.S. exports of manufactures in 
1966, valued f.o.b. producing plant. 

► Agricultural shipments from the state to foreign markets were estimated at $306 million in fiscal 
year 1965-66, seventh highest in the nation. 

► The state's fishery exports were about $1 million in 1966. 



Manufactured exports 

Winston-Salem and Raleigh are the state's principal centers 
of production for export. The bulk of Winston-Salem's over- 
seas sales consist of tobacco manufactures. Electrical and 
nonelectrical machinery are the leading export items from 
Raleigh. Other important export centers are Asheville, Burling- 
ton, Charlotte, Durham, Greensboro, High Point, and Hickory. 

Agricultural exports 

North Carolina's farmers have an important stake in exports 
of various agricultural commodities. Sales to foreign markets 



accounted for 26% of the state's cash receipts from farm 
marketings in fiscal year 1965-66. 

North Carolina's share of U.S. farm exports, including some 
manufactures of agricultural origin, was estimated at (306 
million in 1965-66. Seventh highest among the states, these 
shipments represented an increase of 22*70 in six years. Ac- 
counting for half of the nation's exports of tobacco. North 
Carolina shipped abroad $201 million of this commodity in 
1965-66. (Data include stemmed and redryed tobacco dis- 
cussed above under manufactures.) Other significant agricul- 
tural exports were feedgrains valued at $29/7 million; soy- 
beans, $17.6 million; poultry products, $6.8 million; cotton, 
$5.8 million; and wheat, $5.1 million. 

»U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICf: 1968 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



*\ 



by 



(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilboni 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and Histort/ 



With These Hands: 

A Story of the Southern Highlands 



The hands are twisted and knarled with cal- 
louses, but the fingers are sensitive as they cradle 
the knife. Slowly emerging from the block of 
wood is a goose — graceful yet realistic. The hands 
may be the hands of G. B. Chiltoskey, a gifted 
Cherokee artist or they may be the hand of any 
mountain man, or yet a woman, boy, or girl. 

For two hundred years such hands and talents 
have worked to produce an entire kaleidscope of 
items — colored yarns, coverlids, baskets, pottery, 
wrought iron fireplace tools, wood pretties (made 
from berries, cones, and nuts), dolls or "puppets, 
dulcimers, stencil work, or knotted fringe. 

When the bang of the loom and the whir of the 
wheel were first heard among the hills, the sounds 
were the sounds of necessity. In the cabins on the 
mountainsides few things were made for the joy 
of creating, for cash was seldom seen and articles 
to buy were scarce indeed. Children contributed 
long hours of labor as did the old folks, for furni- 
ture was made at home just as the feed was 
grown in "patches.' Women worked far into the 
night, and while a man could see by the firelight 
he whittled or worked a piece of leather. Fireside 
industry is a most descriptive term for this type 
of work. 

When they settled the hills and coves of the 
Appalachian Mountains the pioneers brought few 
books with them and their scant furnishings; 
what they did bring was a vast wealth of folklore 
and folkways. For many years progress eluded 
the mountain people and life was simple and au- 
stere. When the schoolteachers and settlement 
workers, in the name of Enlightenment, moved 
into the area they found that the culture of the 
Southern Highlands was fast disappearing. 

These missionaries began to collect and to pre- 
serve the knowledge of the descendants of the 
Scotch, English, Irish, and German pioneers. Old 



songs, music and dances were revived, as well as 
many of the handicrafts. People were encouraged 
to set up their looms again, to put up their quilt- 
ing frames, and to fire their forges. Gradually, 
finished items began to appear in city shops. The 
settlement schools were paying off. 

Now came a time when standards must be estab- 
lished and maintained. In 1930 the Southern High- 
lands Handicraft Guild was formed and with it 
certain aims and goals were set — to encourage 
creative use of native materials and originally 
of design, to meet high standards in quality, and 
to seek outlets for items to be exhibited and sold. 
Today the early dream of the Guild is a reality, 
for shops — seasonal and year-round — offer for 
sale hundreds of products from the mountain 
areas of Maryland, both Virginias, both Carolinas, 
Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Alabama. 

Membership in the Guild is open to groups and 




10 



to individuals. Museums display craft treasures 
from the past and a traveling exhibit is shown at 
colleges, libraries, art galleries, and museum. The 
area is also serving as a haven for artists and 
craftsmen who are not native born, who have 
brought with them their special skills. Thus we 
see displayed an enameled flower pin beside one 
made of silver or of a pine cone. 

From July 15 through July 19, 1968, the Craft- 
man's Fair will be held in the Asheville, North 
Carolina, auditorium. The Fair opens at ten 
O'clock in the morning and closes at ten each 
evening. A wonder world of enchantment and 
education awaits the visitor to the Fair. Working 
craftsmen explain the intricate details involved 
in producing a rug, a piece of pottery, or a corn 
shuck doll. Collectors come annually to add to their 
stores of what-have-you. Mountain folk dancing 
offers entertainment and hand-clapping and foot- 
tapping are unrestrained. Two Fairs in 1967 — one 
in Asheville and one in Gatlinburg, Tennessee — 
recorded a total of more 44,000 visitors. The 
Fairs are more than just a show; they are a sales 
outlet for the work of thousands of mountain 
people. The Guild sponsors the Fairs and keeps a 
watchful eye on the products. It also continues 
its program of education through meetings, slide- 
lectures, and a lending library. The Gatlinburg 
Fair, October 22-26, will feature different artisans 
and entertainment. At both Fairs one may come 
and go all day on the price of one admission 
ticket. There are many side trips to be enjoyed 
in the Land of the Sky. 

Whatever your taste, you will find something 
special at the Fairs. Do you long to own and play 
a dulcimer? Have you envied a friend's hand- 
made rifle? Would you like to wear a genuine 
stone, found, cut, and polished in North Carolina? 
Is there a spot in your den which needs a double- 
woven Cherokee Indian basket, a colorful piece 
of pottery or a hearth broom? If you like the 
finer things of life and feel that you cannot afford 
them, you should come to the Fair! Chairs and 
tables made by skilled craftsmen blend beautifully 
with furniture from nearly every period, and they 
are so reasonably priced. As a bonus you may get 
to know the man who made your furniture — these 
are mighty friendly people. Even the proud Chero- 
kees — the first North Carolinians — bring to the 
Fairs their skills that were old when the White 
Man came. Their baskets, rugs, and woodcarvings 
are much sought after. 

If you cannot attend the Fairs write to the 
Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, Post Office 
Box 9145, Asheville, North Carolina 28805, for 




information. To quote from a Guild brochure: 
"Out of the needs and dreams of the mountain 
people, out of the strength and beauty of their 
land, grew the traditional highland crafts." The 
craftsmen believe with Allen Eaton, who wrote 
their story in 1937: "He who does creative work. 
whether he dwells in a place or a hut. has a 
window through he may look out upon some of 
life's finest scenes." 



II 



Floating coconut rafts down 
Pasig River to Manila. 




in 



■u: .W!-iffl 






3rd in a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 

containing her impressions and highlights of her 
visits to the Harbors of the World. 



The 
Philippines, 

land of "Mabuhay. 



» 



Warm voices hail visitors to the soft green swarm of 
more than 7100 tropical islands of the Philippines with, 
"Mabuhay" (ma-BOO-high). In Filipino, the national 
language, this traditional expression of hospitality means 
several things, among them — "long life," welcome," and 
"best wishes." 

On Luzon, largest of the islands, roughly 500 miles from 
Asia, the double-sprawl of Manila, the administrative capi- 
tal, and Quezon City, the legal capital, bulges with over 
two million of the country's 34.5 million widely contrasted, 
fiesta-loving population. 

Ultra modern jet travelers and aboriginal, half-naked 
pygmy negritos still hunting with bows and arrows, live 
within fifty miles of each other. They eat bananas, papaya, 
mangoes, and coconuts from the same groves; rice from the 
same terraces and "lapu-lapu" fish from the same ponds. 
Sleek limousines mingle in traffic confusion with two- 
wheeled buggies drawn by tiny horses, legacy of Kublai 
Khan, wooden-wheeled carts pulled by lumbering "cara- 
bao" (water buffalo), and small "jeepney" busses named 
"Estrellita," "Kiss Me," or "No Time for Love." 

Manila, seat of government and cosmopolitan life, is the 
country's main port city. It was named for pale green 
cabbage-like "nila" plants growing in the now dock-lined 
Pasig river which divides the metropolis and carries cargo 
to and from the Port of Manila. 

The city faces West across 770 square miles of azure 
blue Manila Bay. The Bay is dotted with skimming hydro- 
foils and sailboats — catamarans, square-sailed canoe-like 
"bancas" with outriggers, mat-roofed "cascos," and fast 
mat-sailed "vintas." The wakes of wallowing "lorches" 
pushed along by thirty-foot bamboo poles cross trails with 
Inter-Island ships, rusty freighters and huge ocean-liners. 

Landmarks, radiating like uneven wheel-spokes into the 
120 mile, palm-fringed circumference girdling this fine 
natural harbor, pin-point some of the many bonds between 



Filipinos and Americans. Two peninsulas, one large and 
one small, spread like welcoming arms around the harbor, 
their soil jointly stained with blood of brave men of both 
nations, shed in a common cause during WWII. 

On the Southern arm, Sangley Point U.S. Naval Station 
clings to the tip of small Cavite peninsula. It can be 
reached from Manila across the corner of the bay in 12 
minutes by hydrofoil ferry. Near this point, Commodore 
Dewey's defeat of the Spanish fleet led to the liberation, in 
1898, of the Philippines from almost 400 years of Spanish 
dominance. 

Just off the end of the large arm of Bataan peninsula, 
which juts from the north like a fighter's fist between the 
far side of the bay and the China Sea, tiny Corrigidor is- 
land stands sentinel guard in the mouth of the Bay. It is 
fifty minutes from Manila by hydrofoil. On a knoll over- 
looking Manila, acres of white crosses mark graves of 
WWII servicemen in the American Military cemetery. 

Flaming sunsets briefly high-light day's end over the 
bay only to be snuffed out suddenly like a candle when 
the sun drops below the jagged ridges of Bataan across 
the water. Drifts of sweet fragrance from "sampaguitas," 
the tiny white national flower, mingles in warm tropical 
air with a smell like baking bread from copra ovens. 

At night, modern hotels, restaurants and bars on Rojas 
Boulevard (formerly Dewey) bordering the bay come 
alive with neon lights and entertainment. In the "barrios" 
(villages), small, sun-browned boys ride muddy carabao 
in from their toil in the rice paddies. 

Exports for almost 3000 ocean-going vessels anchoring 
yearly at the modern piers of the Port include: copra, 
sugar, hemp, logs, chromite, copper, iron ore, embroidery 
and canned pineapple. The Philippines supplies half of the 
world's coconut. Some imports are machinery, textiles, 
transport equipment, dairy products, metal goods, cereals, 
base metal and paper products. 



12 



The United States absorbs 40% of Philippine exports 
and originates 35% of its imports. Other chief traders 
are Japan, West Germany and the Netherlands. 

A distinguished Filipino Statesman, Carlos Romulo, 
former Ambassador to the U.S. and President of the U.N. 
General Assembly in 1949-50, said, "The busy shipping in 
Manila's harbor, lying across the ancient trade lanes of 
the East, is this once remote island nation's lifeline to 
the world." 

1963 imports of $618.2 million compared to exports of 
$727.1 million. This maturing democracy has moved 
towards large-scale industrialization, making great strides 
in electric power plants, mining, salt, paper, textiles, food 
preparations, beverages, pharmaceuticals, metal goods, 
electrical apparatus, cement, plywood, glass, rubber 
processing, wood furniture, flour milling and oil refining. 

Recent set-backs have reversed the trend, raising import 
figures above those of exports — even to the point of mak- 
ing it necessary to buy rice. The year 1967, described by 
President Ferdinand Marcos as a "time of trial and chal- 
lenge," saw the Philippines facing many problems. Plagued 
by drought, volcanic eruptions, typhoons, a stiffening 
Communist dissident movement, smuggling, and a yearly 
4% population increase, poverty and unemployment in- 
creased. The average income is $140 per year. 

A four year development program has been initiated by 



President Marcos to remedy some of these ills. Favorable 
reports on this program show some improvement and the 
nation's hopes of being self-sufficient in rice by the end 
of 1969 has been reinforced by the introduction of "miracle 
rice," developed by the International Rice Research Insti- 
tute, which could raise yields by five to seven times. A 
much needed road-building project is reportedly progress- 
ing well. 

Filipinos are sold on education. The establishment in 
Manila of Santo Thomas University in 1611 by Spanish 
colonizers preceded America's oldest University, Harvard, 
by twenty-five years. The Spainards also left a unique 
heritage — ninety percent of Filipinos are Catholic. Almost 
fifty years of American control, up to the time of Phili- 
pine independence on July 4, 1946, ushered in the English 
language, many schools and a veneer of Anglo-Saxon 
civilization. 

These influences are surface covering for the basic 
Malay background of the inhabitants. This Occidental 
culture in a purely Oriental setting, strongly links the 
Philippines, the only Christian nation in Asia, with the 
West. 

"Mabuhay" also means "Godspeed," "goodluck," and 
"farewell." With this in mind, departing visitors return 
the friendly greeting. 

"Mabuhay!" 



Manila Harbor, as seen from the air. 




(Continued from page 5) 

economically transportable and usable 
bean, this market will go to other 
countries. It is well known that many 
countries have a soybean shortage, 
but are producing, using and selling 
sunflower seeds and other commodi- 
ties as substitutes. 

We are also told that the North 
Carolina peanut, which is at present 
a fairly stable commodity on the do- 
mestic market, has been introduced to 
the Japanese market, however, we 
observed U. S. techniques of process- 
ing were not too apparent. One of the 
purposes of the trip was to attract the 
attention of the Japanese population 
to the high protein content and de- 
sirability of consuming North Caro- 
lina peanuts. 

The crux of their situation, of 
course, is a desire to supplement the 
diet with high protein foodstuffs due 
to shortages of red meat. This short- 
age exists because of lack of space to 
produce feed grains and the lack of 
land on which to husband large ani- 
mals. 

So it was that many segments of 
the North Carolina Trade and Travel 
World sent envoys to Japan — and so it 
was that we found many markets 
limited only by man's imagination and 
energy. 

Without reservation, we report to 
the business community as follows : If 
you want to increase your sales, help 
balance payments and increase trade 
with your own nation's best friends 
in Asia, then enter the markets of 
Japan with a strong sales effort. It 
will surprise you. For ready oppor- 
tunities, write to us or to Joel New, 
U. S. Department of Commerce, Box 
1950, Greensboro, N. C. 




Speeding along in excess of 100 mph this photo shows monorail in fore- 
ground, express highway center, ancient castle and modern city right, note 
another railway bridge over river in background. 




Japan 
backg 



farm foreground — modern industry Nursery for children of workers in modern 
round. industrial plant. 





We made this photo as "Hikari" or "Bullet Train" speeds through yards 
in Osaka with us on board, (in background) modern industry — (center — 
"K" Line unit train moves toward seaport probably Kobe. 




Interior of Japanese Inn at Takasaki — 3 girls in tra- 
ditional hostess kimono, having served luncheon to 
visiting North Carolinians. 









Manufacturing plant in Takasaki. 



14 



Our man won't be wearing a foreign intrigue 
trench coat. He won't be loaded down with skis. 
And his head will be conspicuously turbanless. 
But he belongs there just the same. He's on an 
important mission. For you. 

He's the man who helps you with your overseas 
business. When your market is the whole world, 
or even a small part of it. he is right there taking 
care of your every need. Issuing import letters of 
credit, paying and negotiating export letters of 
credit, conducting research for foreign market 
potential. Whatever your need, he'll be there to 



take care of it. 

And no matter where in the world your business 
takes our man, he's still the man from North Car- 
olina. A man you can talk with. A man who can 
handle your business more speedily and with less 
red tape. All because he's based very close to 
home. 

With us, you're ahead in two ways. You have the 
advantage of a man working knowledgeably for 
you in any spot in the world. And the extra bonus 
of working with a man from your home state. It's 
the best of both worlds. 




On the Orient Express 

you might sit next to 

a Russian spy, 

a ski bum from St. Moritz, 

an Italian film director, 

two monks on a pilgrimage, 

a meditating maharaja, 



or a banker 
from North Carolina, 



O First Union National Bank /International Department 
pMaRinrrF north rioni ima mcmbu r.o i .c. 



CHARLOTTE. NORTH CAROLINA 



WCM»tR r.D.i c. 



Wilshipco Joins I AT A 

This past February the Charlotte office of Wil- 
mington Shipping Company was approved by the 
INTERNATIONAL AIR TRANSPORT ASSOCI- 
ATION as an international air cargo sales agent. 
Wilmington Shipping Co. is now in a position to 
solicit and handle export air traffic. 

Wilmington Shipping's Charlotte office is lo- 
cated in the new West Concourse of Douglas Mu- 
nicipal Airport. The Charlotte office was opened 
during August of 1964 as a customs brokerage 
and traffic solicitation branch. 

Since 1964 opening the staff of this office has 
grown from two to five full time employees. With 
the recent IATA appointment WILSHIPCO will 
now be able to better serve its many international 
shippers. Mr. James L. Garst III will be handling 
the air export traffic. 



See Advertisement — Page 2U 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Manager — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 

1 Export Traffic Mgr. 

JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




^MoreAtaJ Qty 



Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P. W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



16 



wr 




BARBER 



Specialisfs in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



CTP 



XjS with 

CARTERET . . . 






. . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 



Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 



Charles Piner & Teen Piner 
Operators 



PA 6-5440 




S tapping Go-. 

STEAMSHIP 
& 
FORWARDING AGENTS 



PHONE 919 - 726-6173 

CABLE "DAVIES" 
TWX 919 - 530-2972 

F. M. C. NO. 1079 



P. 0. BOX 650 • MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



17 



EXPORTUNITTES 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950, Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 






FOR INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Fruit, Tree Nut, Vegetable Farms 

Venezuela . . . Fresh peaches, apples, pears, prunes. 

plums. 
Livestock Farms 

Mexico . . . Beltsville turkeys. 

Canning, Preserving Foods 

Germany . . . Canned fruits, vegetables; canned 
fruit juices; dried, dehydrated fruits, vegetables. 

Bakery Products 

France . . . Biscuits, crackers, bakery products, 
related grocery specialties. 

Textile Mill Products 

Ecuador . . . Yard goods of all types. 

Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Italy . . . Printed, plain hand towels; bath carpets. 
sets. 



Steel Mill Products 

Libya . . . Construction steel. 

Farm Machinery 

Brazil . . . Farm machinery, equipment. 

Special Industry Machinery 

Austria . . . Small machine tools for woodworking 
shops. 

Netherlands . . . All kinds of cryogenic equipment 
for production, storage, transport and handling of 
liquefied industrial gases. Equipment for preservation 
of biologic products in liquid introgen or dry ice. 

General Industrial Machinery 

Netherlands . . . Packaging machinery for various 
industries including case packers, palletizing and de- 
palletizing equipment. 

Aircraft, Parts 

Ceylon . . . Used aircraft with two engines, pre- 
ferably turbo-prop, having maximum capacity of 30 40 
passengers. 



Knitting Mills, Products 

Jordan . . . Women's, children's, infants' underwear, 
pants, clothing; men's, boys' socks; women's stockings. 

Sawmills, Planing Mills 

France . . . Lumber and timber, Oregon: Douglas 
fir; pitchpine, other American varieties of hard, soft- 
woods. 

Agricultural Chemicals 

Switzerland . . . Fertilizers, agricultural disinfec- 
tants. 

Structural Clay Products 

Thailand . . . Wall tile, mosaic tile. 



Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments, Supplies 

Switzerland . . . Medical-electronic equipment, in- 
struments for clinical laboratories, biomedical re- 
search. 

Photographic Equipment 

France . . . Electrostatic photocopying machines. 

Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

Yugoslavia . . . "Do-it-your-self" kits for building 
sailboats, rowing boats, motor boats. 

Pens, Pencils, Office, Artists' Materials 

Thailand . . . Carbon paper, stencil paper, pens, 
pencils, other stationery items. 



18 




How do you go around the world on paper? 

That's a problem you deal with every day. 

Your international business operation depends on 

paperwork: commercial letters of credit, acceptance 

financing, credit information, shipping documents. 

Wachovia's International Department can help you 

fulfill all your foreign obligations with ease. 

We can channel your requirements through banks in 

over 100 countries. And you are assured that men 

who specialize in world-wide banking 

are handling your needs all the way. 

To find out how Wachovia's International Department 

can take your business abroad with flying colors, 

write or phone our Winston-Salem office. 

Do it today. 



International Department 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

IT*. H. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous 
marginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 
feet of water alongside at mean low water 
(channel project now being deepened to 38 
feet) capable of working seven vessels simul- 
taneously. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring 
dolphins, supported by tank farm and available 
undeveloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered. mod- 
ern, concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 
506,000 square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as 
other open areas between sheds and at ends of 
wharf, backed up by 13 acres of paved open 
storage accessible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500.000 square feet, fully 
sprinklered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space 
available by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240,000 square 
feet, open ends, concrete and steel, paved build- 
ing, equipped with overhead bridge cranes and 
served by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES : All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification 
and Value Section, located on terminal prop- 
erty. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car 
scale conveniently located on terminal. Certi- 
fied weighmasters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE : Double marginal tracks with cross- 
overs along full length of wharf apron. De- 
pressed tracks serving rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Storage yard capacity — 370 rail 
cars. (Four diesel switching engines operated 
by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton gantry cranes 
used singly or in tandem; also equipped for 
80-inch magnet and two or six-yard bucket op- 
erations. A third crane operational 1968 — 75 
tons at 70 foot radius. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT : Forklifts of 
various capacities with accessories — cotton and 
paper clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5- 
ton mobile crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top rail- 
cars possible by prior arrangement. Rail and 
truck docks for loading and unloading at tran- 
sit sheds and warehouses ; ramps for easy 
access into sheds and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with 
two large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Com- 
pany plus numerous highway motor carriers. 
Locally domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships 
Agents, Customs Brokers, and Freight For- 
warders. 

SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental 
buildings available to private enterprise for 
specialized purposes. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 



S0UTHP0RT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



A Facility of 

North Carolina State Ports Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOKEHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45- 
foot apron. Berth six 500-foot cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean 
low water. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square 
feet. Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one 
of metal. All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, 
totaling 556,000 square feet, sprinklered with 
deluge systems. Total 30 fire segregation sec- 
tions. 

OPEN STORAGE: Open storage are available. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available 
on terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with cross- 
over, full length of wharf. Single depressed 
track full length rear of transit sheds and 
warehouses. Southern Railway freight car stor- 
age yard adjacent to port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts 
with detachable accessories such as barrel 
clamps, cotton clamps, pallets, etc. Facilities 
for full palletization cargoes. Tractors and 
trailers. Berths 6 and 7 designed for two 75-ton 
gantry cranes operational 1968. 



U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port of 
entry with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage 
and shipment of bulk cargoes now under con- 
struction. Completion date 1968. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail 
docks for loading or unloading at transit sheds 
and warehouses; easy access into transit sheds 
and warehouses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest va- 
cuum cyanide and acritet fumigation facilities. 
Two 9,000 cubic foot steel chambers, fully 
mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern— A&EC 
Railway system and the Beaufort-Morehead 
Railroad plus numerous highway motor car- 
riers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Securitv force on dutv at all times. 

L 




Your 
needs 




Let's button-up a great relationship. 



FIRST- CITIZENS BANK 



the Can-Do Bank with the Can-Do People! 



In RALEIGH, CHARLOTTE and other fine North Carolina Communities • CAPITAL AND SURPLUS: OVER $30,1 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

© FIRST-CITIZENS BANK & TRUST COMPANY 1965 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



103 

1865- Years 
Now 



1968 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. Baltimore, md. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



412 Grovier Bldg 
JAckson 5-8164 



221 E. Redwood Street 
SAratoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Granby St. 
Suit 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Line Handling 



Phone 763-8494 



WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg Tel (919) 763-827! 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treosurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Deportment 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



23 



WILMINGTON 
SHIPPING 
COMPANY 



(CHARLOTTE) 



announces it is an 



I ATA 
APPROVED SALES AGENT 



We are now in a position to handle 
your air freight exports. Let one call 
take care of your international traffic. 
Import/Export-Air or Surface. 




Quality In Air Transport 



Wilmington Shipping Co. 

Box 27086 Douglas Municipal Airport 

Charlotte, N. C. 

392-4116 Area Code 704 392-8161 

F.M.C. 469 

Steamship and Forwarding Agents 
Stevedores * Customhouse Brokers 

IATA APPROVED 34-9-3832 



24 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island — Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water A Market Sta. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color Block & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-031 2 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704—392-3171 

Charlotte, N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Tmelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of America, Inc. 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATf HEADOUAITftS. TIUCKING IUUDING. lAlflCM 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mur. 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAIL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



IU1I tATE 
U 5 'o..oe* 

PAID 

Bol*.gh N C 

HmB No 32 



We treat your cargo as if 
it were our own baby. 




HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 







vm 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



Nartit Caroiina St 
Raleigh 





How do you go around the world on paper? 

That's a problem you deal with every day. 

Your international business operation depends on 

paperwork: commercial letters of credit, acceptance 

financing, credit information, shipping documents. 

Wachovia's International Department can help you 

fulfill all your foreign obligations with ease. 

We can channel your requirements through banks in 

over 100 countries. And you are assured that men 

who specialize in world-wide banking 

are handling your needs all the way. 

To find out how Wachovia's International Department 

can take your business abroad with flying colors, 

write or phone our Winston-Salem office. 

Do it today. 



International Department 

WACHOVIA 

BANK & TRUST COMPANY 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad L6 

Carteret County 24 

Carteret Towing Co., Ine 17 

Colorcraft Studios 24 

DuBant, O. E. Ship Chandler 24 

First Union National Bank 15 

Heide Company 23 

Heide Company Luekenbach Baek Cover 

Hi-Page Co 24 

Maersk Line 23 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Ine 23 

New Hanover County 17 

N. C. Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. Shipping Co 17 

North Carolina National Bank 19 

Ryan Stevedoring ( lo 1 

Southern Railway Inside Baek Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust (Jo. ...Inside- Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance L6 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Ine 23 

Wilmington Shipping Co L6 

W. O. Smith & Co., Ine 23 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STATE M{A0OUA»TIIS. TluCKING IUHDinG tAlEICM 



r 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



The World Trade Association 



The World Trade Association, the North Carolina 
Industrial Foundation, the North Carolina State Ports 
Authority, and the Regional Export Expansion Council 
all met in Wilmington during the two-day period of May 
8 and 9. 

Part of the program of the World Trade Association 
was the report by those people attending the Trade 
Fair in Tokyo on the situation in World Trade with 
Japan. Featured was John Palmer, President of Tobac- 
co Associates. 

At the present time, Japan is one of the largest cus- 
tomers for North Carolina non-processed leaf tobacco. 



Another feature of the two-day meeting was a tour of 
the N. C. State Port Terminal in Wilmington by mem- 
bers of the various organizations and, finally, at a 
closing Dinner, Edgar Luckenbach, of Luckenbach 
Steamship Company, delivered the key note address. 

J. Edgar Kirk of Raleigh is President of the NCWTA, 
and is Chairman of the Regional Export Expan- 
sion Council. He led the discussions and presided at 
most of the meetings. 

Present for the two-day gathering were one hun- 
dred business men from all over North Carolina with 
their wives. 



The Voice You Hear. . . 



looks like this, when you call Morehead City 726-3158 - Area Code 919 and hear "State Ports Authority" — The 
attractive voice belongs to Mrs. Jana Swain (below left) likewise when you call 763-1621, Wilmington - Area Code 
919 — you get another attractive voice (below right) Mrs. Virginia Price. Isn't it amazing how they look as they 
sound? 





New Service 



Flomerca Line of Guatemala has announced a new ser- 
vice from the United States to Central America and 
Bluefields, Nicaragua. This will be the only mid 
Atlantic/Central American service in operation. Flo- 
merca Line has signed a one-year contract with the firm 
of Hampton Hardwood of Norfolk, Virginia, to handle 



their lumber shipments on a fortnightly basis with dis- 
charge at Newport News, Va. and Wilmington, North 
Carolina. Flomerca Line has chartered two (2) special 
vessels the M/V MERCANTINE and the M/V MERC 
VIGGO in order to handle the commitments both north- 
bound and southbound. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
KIRKWOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
L. R. BOWERS, Whiteville 
W. B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville, V.Chm 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Exec. Com. 
H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 

WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



\. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION ^> 

STHTE PORTS 



3 




SUMMER ISSUE, 1968, SPA MAGAZINE VOL. 14, NO. 2 



CONTENTS 



. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTH1S, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

UGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

Slate Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

IHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Bulk Facility 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

Stale Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

f, H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations Manager 

SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 

WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code 212) 269-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Public Relations 



World Trade Association 

Dedication 

History] and Trail 

Southampton 

Exportunities 

New Man on the Go 



Page 
2 
4 

10 
12 
18 
22 



In this issue we present for the fourth time a continuing feature culled 
"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is being written 
for us hi/ Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. Mrs. Casey bus rpeni 
many years traveling, particularly in the orient and the south sens. The 
fourth feature is on Southampton. (See Pages 12 and 13). 

Photo credits should be given to: North Carolina Department of 
Conservation and Development, Raleigh; E. A. C. Howells, Southampton, 
England; A. L. Honeycutt, Edenton; WRAL-TV; Tom Lindtvit, Morehead 
City; and Hugh Morton, Wilmington. 



STHTE PORTS 



yf^Sf" 



COVER STORY 



Here is the famous State Port Porthole 
eover again. This time we gaze out to 
see Morehead City SPA Terminal at 

top and Wilmington SPA Terminal at 
bottom. Both photos are recent. The 
top photo is bv Tom Lindtvit — Soros 
Engineer at M. II. C and the Wilming- 
ton photo by Grandfather Mountain 
Entrepenenr, Hugh Morton, who is also 
no mean hand with the camera. The two 
Port Terminals you are looking at are 
the two fastest growing in the Pastern 
United States. 




or information about: 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. 0. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 9 19 8l" 




Richards, Parette, Redmond, Davis, Moore 

On August 2nd in Morehead City Governor Dan 
Moore, native-born-son of western North Carolina 
mountains, stood on the newly constructed wharf at the 
barge terminal of the North Carolina State Port Ter- 
minal and uttered these words: 

It is indeed a pleasure and a privilege to represent the 
people of North Carolina at this dedication ceremony for the 
Morehead City Port Terminal Bulk Cargo Handling Facility. 



The State Ports of Wilmington and Morehead City, under 
the splendid direction of the State Ports Authority, are a source 
of great pride and their value to our thriving economy is be- 
yond measure. The existence of modern and efficient port 
facilities provides North Carolina industry with a gateway to 
buy and sell throughout the world. 

The export trade already means a great deal to the economic 
well-being of this State, and its future potential is virtually 
unlimited. According to the latest estimates available from 
the Department of Commerce, the total amount of world trade 
in North Carolina amounts to over $1,200,000,000 per year. 
Approximately $850 million are exports and $400 million 
are imports. Our State ranks thirteenth among the States in 
value of manufactured exports and seventh in agricultural 
shipments to foreign markets. Exports of agricultural products 
have increased 22 percent in a period of six years. Tne heal- 
thy expansion in this area of economic activity is of tremendous 
significance to our citizens. It has been estimated that for 
every $1 million created in exports, 150 new jobs are added. 
I am informed also that exports in North Carolina are in- 
creasing at the rate of $30 million each year. I am confident 
that the import -export trade conducted by our industries 
through our responsive and improved port facilities will con- 
tinue to expand and flourish. 

Our port terminals in North Carolina offer many advantages 
to industry already established in the State and provide a 
favorable attraction for other industries considering our 
State as a site for new operations. Raw materials, partially 
manufactured goods and finished products move through our 
ports to and from North Carolina in a two-way port service 
which is of immeasurable benefit to all business and industry 
throughout the State. Naturally, our port facilities are most sen- 



New Era for Carteret 




sitive to the particular needs of Tar Heel industrial interests. 
As a result, North Carolina ports have provided both specialized 
equipment and facilities to meet these needs. The facility which 
we dedicate on this occasion is an excellent example of tins 
policy in action. 

The Morehead City Fort Terminal Bulk Cargo Handling 
Facility has been designed for the movement of phosphate car- 
goes. It is considered to be the most modern bulk cargo 
handling terminal in the world. Totally new concepts have 
been used, and the basic layout is designed so that its capacity 
may be doubled without disruption of basic operations and at 
minimal expense. The proportions of this complex are gigan- 
standards. The storage building is large enough to 



tic by any 



games at 
("he contin 



ige 
magni- 



thousands of spectators. The continuous length of the belt 
leading from the storage building to the shiploadmg tower is 
approximately four-fifths of a mile. Three thousand tons per 
hour can be fed by the conveyor belt through the shiploader. 
If the same quantity of material was moved bv the average 
dump truck, 1,500 such vehicles would be required, Tin 

rude of the operations here is most impressive. 

The financing of this $1 1% million complex illustrates the full 
potential oi cooperation between the Federal (Government, the 
State, and private' industry to achieve sound industrial develop- 
ment on a large scale. The necessary hinds were acquired 
through the joint efforts of the Economic Development Ad- 
ministration, the State Forts Authority, the Texas Gulf Sulphur 
Company, First-Citizens Bank and Trust Company, First Union 
Natioaul Bank, North Carolina National Bank, and Wachovia 
Bank and Trust Company. The construction of this Bulk Cargo 
Handling Facility is an example of What can be accomplished bv 
government and industry. This is the type of cooperation I have 
sought to promote since the day I became Governor. I have al- 
ways believed that if government and private industry could 
cooperate fully in serving the needs of industry, then great re- 
sults could be accomplished. The validity of this concept was 
never more visible than it is today. 

The benefits from the operation of this Bulk Cargo Handling 
Facility will be numerous and far reaching. Activities will be 
extended in the facility itself as well as in the tug-boat and 
barge movement operations from the mining areas. Additional 
tug-boat and pilotage service will be necessary at the port. 
Steamship agents, stevedore companies and other similar 
port interests will also expand operations. It has been estimated 
that additional jobs in this area alone will total in excess of 75. 

The movement of phosphate cargoes is expected to increase 
the tlow of Other products through the port. For example, ships 
calling here for part cargoes of phosphate should find it advan- 
tageous to discharge or load other commodities while they are 
here. As a result, import-export trade will increase and job 
potential for the area will continue to grow. Phosphate mining 



operations are expanding rapidly in Eastern North Carolina. 
The Texas Gulf Sulphur Company, the North Carolina Phos- 
phate Company, the Magnet Cove Barium Company and the 
FMC Corporation will make good use of this outstanding public 



facility for the movement of phosphate cargoes. 

I appreciate the opportunity to participate in the dedication 
of this fine addition to our port facilities. I commend Chairman 
Ed Richards and the members of the State Ports Authority for 
their dedication and leadership in this project. The Morehead 
City State Port Terminal Bulk Cargo Handling Facility truly 
opens up the sea for us in North Carolina and makes us even 
more fully citizens of the world. 

Acting as Master of Ceremonies for the Dedication 
was E. N. Richards of Raleigh, long time resident of 
North Carolina, builder, creator of shopping centers, 
country clubs and housing developments. To those who 
are very familiar with Richards' activities in the field 
of development, the remarkable expansion and develop- 
ment of the State Port Terminal at Morehead City is 
almost common place. 

When Governor Moore had finished his dedicatory 
address, Chairman Richards called upon Mr. Lawrence 
Redmond, representing the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce. Mr. Redmond is a native born North Carolinian 



who has spent twenty years in Washington, D. C. Mr. 
Redmond's remarks highlighted the way the federal 
government and its executive agencies cooperated with 
the administration of North Carolina and the State- 
Ports Authority to serve the phosphate industry, the new 
giant which has grown up in formerly isolated parts oi 
Beaufort County on the nearby Pamlico River. Succeeding 
Mr. Redmond on the program was Mr. Bernard Par- 
rette, as General Counsel for the Economic Development 
Administration. 

Some years ago Carteret County, floundering in the 
economic doldrums, was recognized an underdeveloped 
community by the ARA. The ARA was a creation of John 
Kennedy, President of the United States, shortly alter 
his election in I960. Upon succeeding Mr. Kennedy as 
President, Lyndon Baines Johnson, with the assistance 
of native North Carolinian Luther Hodges, then Secre- 
tary of Commerce, formulated the idea of the EDA. 
Almost simultaneously with this contribution to progress 
by the National Administration, the Texas Gulf Sul- 
phur Company, a large corporation conducting explora- 
tion and mining operations all over the face of the 
globe, began to develop an operation in open pit 
phosphate rock mining in Beaufort County, some fifty 
miles, by navigable waters, from Morehead City. 

In the early development of the phosphate mine, 
the Ports Authority sent representatives to TGS, sug- 
gesting that the port terminal at Morehead City could 
be used as an off-loading base for the international ex- 
port- of phosphate and phosphate derivatives. Subse- 
quent negotiations, extending over a period of eighteen 
months, resulted in a public agreement allowing the 
phosphate industry a savings of large sums by guaran- 
teeing to the North Carolina Ports Authority an average 
one million tons annual shipment of phosphate. With 
this guarantee, and the above-mentioned assistance from 
EDA officials in Washington, a 1 1 .4 million dollar loan 
was negotiated. 




The firm of Soros Associates created a design which 
was called one of the most modern automated conveyor 
belt facilities in the world. Nat Harrison Associates of 




Ports Authority left to right. Pharr, Ross, Bowers, Purvis 



Chairman Richards, Director Davis standing, members Adams 
Gudger, Weathers, Secretary & Treasurer De Vane. 



Miami and James E. Cox Construction Company, with 
Blythe Brothers Construction Company, became the 
prime contractors, and using wharf designs by J. N. 
Pease Associates, a native North Carolina firm in Char- 
lotte, contributing their ability, and the Southerland 
Electric Company as the principal electrical contractor. 
Specialized Machinery was manufactured in Germany by 
the Krupp Works, of international fame. The conveyor 
belt system was created by B. F. Goodrich Company. 

Placing it all together in logical sequence to serve 
the modern loading barges of IBC Transportation Com- 
pany of Beaufort County, this giant three thousand ton 
per hour capacity off-loader for phosphate and phos- 
phate derivatives was constructed. Operated by four 
men, it will transfer phosphate to the 1 06,000 ton stor- 
age reservoir, and thence at the rate of 3,000 tons per 
hour to ships tied up at the 1000 foot berth at the State 
Port Terminal. 

The dedication of the terminal was also attended by 
Mr. William E. Davis, Mr. Ross Manley, Mr. Charles 
Edwards, Mr. Frank Sampson and Mr. Ray Gentry of 

Enjoying informal luncheon at Tony's Restaurant. Left to right: 
Governor Moore, Mrs. H. L. Weathers, Mr. Weathers, Mrs. 
Moore. 




the Economic Development Administration. From the 
U. S. Corps of Engineers, present were Major General 
Edwin Hayes and Colonel Paul Dennison. From the 
U. S. Marine Corps, Major General J. O. Butcher. The 
Congressional Delegation was to be represented, but on 
the last day of Congress before adjournment found it 
necessary to decline by Special telegram to Chairman 
Richards prior to the ceremony. 

Also seated on the platform were Members of the 
Council of State and heads of other agencies in state 
government, including those people directly involved 
with this expansion program, such as Wayne Corpening, 
Director of Aministration; Frank Turner, Property Con- 
trol Officer; Parks Icenhour, Assistant Attorney Gen- 
eral, representing the Attorney General of North Caro- 
lina. 

Also present on the platform were Joseph Guandolo, 
bond attorney from New York and former attorney for 
SPA now Justice of the N. C. Supreme Court Joseph 
Branch. Conspicuous in the day's events was the talented 
and charming First Lady of North Carolina, Mrs. Dan 
Moore. Immediately following the ceremony, a public 



Left to right: William E. Davis— EDA, Mrs. F. H. Ross, Jr. 
Chairman of SPA Richards & Executive Committeeman Ross 





Visible left to right: at luncheon SPA member wife Mrs. George 
Purvis of Fayetteville and Mr. Purvis, Mrs. Lawrence Bowers 
& Mr. Bowers — across table top of head Mr. Kirkwood Adams 
chats with Mrs. William Pharr. Back to Camera— Mr. Pharr 
studies menu and Mrs. Lamar Gudger of Asheville smiles 
across the table. 





Left to Right: SPA member— Attorney 
Lamar Gudger & Mrs. Gudger— with Governor 
Moore. 



Left to right: Charles Edwards, Raleigh, Mr. & Mrs. Ross Man- 
ley, Huntington, W. Va. Frank Sampson, Huntington across 
table Harold Kahl, Morehead City SPA, Mr. & Mrs. Barnard 
Parette .Washington, D.C. James Register, Washington, D.C. 



r^eption was held at Tony Seamon's Sanitary Restau- 
rant by the Greater Carteret Chamber of Commerce. 
The hard-working and affable Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manger of the Chamber of Commerce, Phil Bul- 
lock, did a grand job. Spotlighted during introductions 
by Chairman Richards was Resident Engineer, Thomas 
Lindtvit, of the firm of Soros Associates. Tom was the 
midwife, at the birth of this facility, and he was ably as- 
sisted by the State Ports PhosphateSuperintendent Harold 
Kahl. Harold is justifiably proud of this great facility. 

The ceremony was attended by well over five hundred 
people. The temperature was about 95 degrees, but a 
twenty mile an hour wind was blowing out of the south- 
west, and the two flags on the speaker's platform stood 
out firm in the breeze. The U. S. Marine Corps band, 
under the direction of Warrant Officer Smith, provided 
music for the occasion. 

Miss North Carolina from New Bern, Miss Annette 
Johnson was a surprise visitor. Prior to the public recep- 



tion at Tony's ten TV Stations, cameramen, and wire 
services and news media reporters, as well as the gen- 
eral public were conducted on a tour of the facility. To 
coin a phrase, "A great time was had by all". 

Later that evening a Dinner was held in honor of 
Governor and Mrs. Moore and the North Carolina 
State Ports Authority by Nat Harrison Associates, the 
prime General Contractor. Present were representatives 
of federal and state government, bankers, contractors, 
engineers, and transportation people from all over the 
world. 

Governor Moore was given two large 4-color framed 
portraits of the port terminals at Wilmington and More- 
head City, and Mrs. Moore contributed a splendid short 
talk and received a great ovation. 

Completion and activation of this facility represents a 
16.5 million dollar investment in Morehead Citj since 
1961. The economic impact of this State Port Terminal 
on the entire area is clearly demonstrated b\ the more 




Soros Engineer Tom Lindtvit (left) looks at prints with Harold 
Kahl SPA — in background giant loading tower & boom. 




SPA Vice-Chairman George Purvis 
introduces Governor Moore 



than 100% increase in tax valuation in the county of space permit here, that all these people receive the prop- 

Carteret during the period. In the ceremony and during er credit. 

the recitations of these events, many people who contri- So from the ancient poet, may we borrow this line: 

buted a little or a lot to this accomplishment have not "Many a rose is born to blush unseen". 

been mentioned. It is not humanly possible, nor does 



Phosphate Handling Super for SPA Harold Kahl surveys — part 
of his new 11.4 million "gadget". The most modern of its 

kind in the world. 





DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
— »i TRAIL 



by 



(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilborn 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives avd History 



EDENTON: 

Serene Lady of the Albemarle 



"Tranquil" — "serene" — "peaceful" these are the 
words that first come to mind when you stand at the 
Barker House or on the Courthouse Green and look 
across the water which seems to encircle the Town of 
Edenton. The three words above are partially deceptive, 
for underneath the quiet and sedate appearance of 
Edenton, there is a hustle of activity. 

On June 9 the small Visitor Center-Museum in the 
Barker House was dedicated, culminating several 
years of preparation. The displays tell the story of 
the town and of Chowan County from their beginnings 
to the present. 

Photos — Department of Conservation and Development 

Chowan County Courthouse 







III - 1 ttj — fl^i 


p 




1 D ;-v ;, ■■'■*'■:■ 


Tj ■- 




n E-y^.-tf ,. 


&= 







Edenton itself was created by an act of the Assembly 
in 1712; the first town lot was sold in 1715 to Charles 
Forts. After the death of Governor Charles Eden in 
1722 "ye towns on Queen Anne's creek was named in 
his honor." Before the town was established St. Paul's 
Parish had been designated. The Society for the Pro- 
pagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts attempted 
to build a church in the parish but after ten years the 
building was so poorly put together that "Hoggs and 
Cattle" used it for a shelter and made it "a loathsome 
place." Today a later St. Paul's Episcopal Church 



James Iredell House 




Photo by A. L. Honeycutt, Jr. 



10 



(begun 1736) and Churchyard are open to visi- 
tors; the rector of the church, like other Edentonians, 
has interested himself in the history of the area. St. 
Paul's has been called "an ideal in rural church design." 

It was in Edcnton that the ladies of the Albemarle 
took action prior to the American Revolution and re- 
solved no longer to use East India tea." A rather start- 
ling cartoon of this "tea party" appeared in England — 
since reprinted in numerous publications. 

Though there is much to see along the tree-lined 
streets only five properties are now open to the public. 
Many of the beautifully kept houses still belong to the 
families who settled the town in the 1 7()()'s. Among 
those opened by Historic Edenton is the Cupola House 
built by Richard Sanderson and later occupied by 
colonial official Francis Corbin. Though the original 
paneling from this house is in the Brooklyn Museum of 
Fine Arts, the Cupola House remains "the finest framed 
Jacobean-type house south of Connecticut." The in- 
terior was copied (courtesy of the Brooklyn Museum) 
during the recent restoration. 

The Chowan County Courthouse, one of the most 
beautiful government structures in America, shows co- 
lonial architecture at its best. The Assembly Room is 
one of the "largest colonial American paneled" rooms. 
It is not difficult to imagine that history happened 
here — in the person of a James Iredell, Samuel John- 
ston, Christopher Gale, Joseph Hewes, or Penelope 
Barker. 

James Iredell, appointed as justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States by George Washington, 
lived in a house that is now restored and open to visi- 
tors. The house was saved by a small group of women in 
a dramatic move. Now the property of the State, the 
Edenton Tea Party D. A. R. Chapter is attempting to 
furnish the house to the period in which Iredell lived. 
Also on the Iredell property is a restored kitchen, ne- 
cessary house, and the Bandon Plantation schoolhouse. 
inglis Fletcher wrote her series of novels about the 
Albemarle region at Bandon, which was destroyed by 
fire several years ago. 

Edenton was the largest of the northeastern ports in 
the colony and from here the colonists shipped naval 
stores and other lumber products. Furs, foodstuffs, 
and tobacco were also a source of income for the in- 
habitants. After the lapse of a hundred years, lumber in 
the form of pulpwood is again important. Peanuts 
long ago replaced cotton as the money crop of the 
Albemarle section and additional industries are mo- 
ving into Chowan. Nonetheless, the history-conscious 
citizens of Edenton and Chowan County have banded 
together to retain and preserve the eighteenth-century 
atmosphere wherever possible. 

The Barker House is owned by three civic groups 
formerly used it as a "community center"; the Iredell 
House ladies gladly gave tours; the Cupola House was 





Cupola House 







Penelope Barker House 



used for years as the town library — now Historic Edenton. 
Inc., with representatives from almost every organiza- 
tion, is operating the visitor center-museum and hos- 
tesses conduct tours of the sites, daily except on Mon- 
day. 

It is a dream conie true for many Chowan residents. 
It was accomplished by people who gave unselfishK 
of time and money. The State Department of Archives 
and History, Dr. Christopher Crittenden. Director, has 
cooperated in almost every phase of recent develop- 
ment. 

Schoolchildren and teen-agers, as well as mam 
adults, will know more of the life of colonial North 
Carolinians because of this regional effort. As Inglis 
Fletcher wrote in her autobiography Pay, l\uk and fol- 
low: 

"It will be a good life for our children and our chil- 
dren's children, for the land remains, vital and ever- 
giving of its richness of those who cherish it." 



11 




Berth of the "Mayflower" and the "Queen" 



4th in a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 
containing her impressions and highlights of her visits 
to Southampton 

"As 1 came down to 'Southampton by the soft sea-water 

1 saw long ships, their mast heads ever bowing 

Sweet slender maids in changing gowns of golden 

Curtsying stately in a fashion olden 

Bowing sweetly — each a king's fair daughter 

— by the myriad moving water." 

So it once was. But now? Southampton, which 
launched the Mayflower in 1620, is today a magnificent 
well -developed harbor in the area known as the Garden 
of England. 

Situated at the confluence of the rivers Test and It- 
chen, midways of England's south coast, it is the world's 
greatest passenger seaport. On 600 acres, shaped like an 
unfinished jig-saw puzzle on reclaimed tidal mud-land, 
a 90 minute bus tour over ten miles of port roadway 
covers only a part of the accessories to five-and-a- 
half miles of modern docks. 

Drive-on/drive-off cross channel car ferries, "hover- 
craft" as up-to-date as mini-skirts, and deep-water berths 
for the newest in "piggy -back" containers and the 
world's largest power-driven freight and passenger liners 
mingle along its quays. In 1966, more than 23 million 
tons of cargo and 63% of three million overseas visitors 
to Great Britain inundated the port's efficient facilities. 

Yet something about the wide expanse of blue water, which 
has earned its "South for Sunshine" slogan— except for the 
unaccountable moods that mark English weather — brings to 



"Apologies to author Falkenburg for substituting South- 
ampton (which seemed once would have been so fitting) 
for South Street. 



Pictures courtesy of E. A. C. Howells, ERD, Chief D( 
Manager, British Transport Docks Board, Dock Ho 
Canute Road, Southampton, England. 



mind brave sailing days of the past. The beginnings of vast 
trans-Atlantic traffic which irrevocably linked the Old World 
and the New with exchanges of tea and cotton, Beatles and sol- 
diers, woolens and automobiles, steel and petroleum, wine and 
Scotch whiskey, coal and bananas. 

Meandering little wooded hills mark the terrain of 
Scotland, England and Wales which make up Great Bri- 
tain, the largest island in Europe. With Ireland and a 
scattering of smaller islands it forms the United King- 
dom Of Great Britain. A combined population of nearly 
55 million proud, hardy people are steeped in widely 
divergent traditions. Stolid coal-miners, brash sea- 
farers, earnest intellectuals and reigning royalty. 

This little Island group, esconced staunchly off the 
northwest coast of the Continental land mass is 
ideally situated for the imaginative use it has made of 
world-wide waterways. 

Because of numerous navigable rivers, an extensive 
coastline outlining more than 93,500 square miles, and 
its long history as a maritime nation, Britain now has in 
operation around 300 ports. Over 90 of these, of which 
Southampton is one, are licensed to handle imports. 

Southampton is just seventy-five fast rail miles from 
London and has 16 million people within a hundred 
mile radius. It has, since 964 A. D. when the Roman set- 
tlements of Hamwieh and Hamtun combined, forming it 
as Suthamptune, been the gateway to Britain. 

At this port, where England's first kingdom was be- 
gun, majestic names of Southampton's docks attest to 
Britain's long-standing Monarchy government. The Em- 
press Docks were opened in 1890 by Queen Victoria. 
King George V Dry Dock — the largest in the world 



12 






W^mfo 


^JkkFS-'-*^ _^& 




KW*"^ .^>£ir~j-^~- 




!^i§ 


3^i ^ 






lisp* ^jjfl 


|P ^|- 


**Jii ^^v^B 




HP* / 




u^c^^^p> 




"JL'^SL 









with a capacity to take ships of 100, 000 tons, and one 
of seven complete dry-docks — was opened in L933 by 
King George V. 

A curious phenomena known as the "double tide" en- 
hances other natural advantages of the port. It holds 
the deep water up to the Docks at all states of the tide, 

Eroviding a prolonged period of slack water. The deep, 
road, six-mile estuary of Southampton water, guarded at 
its mouth by a huge natural barrier, the Isle of Wight, 
enjoys a strategic location on the ocean shipping routes 
to the nearby Continent. Lines on a world map showing 
sea-routes served speedily by every modern convenience 
from the Docks, now owned by the British Transport 
Docks Board, Ian out like Maypole streamers to about 
100 ports on every part of the globe. 

Power-operated gangways telescope out to 
ships from the attractive Ocean Terminal to 
passengers for a quick pass through landing 
Cargo, from fro/en meat to heavy loads of 
transferred by 130 electric portal cranes and 
ton floating crane, directly to Southampton's 
or to waiting rail or road, fast transportation to anywhere 
in the country. Annually, petroleum installations supply 
more than half a million tons of fuel to ocean-going 
ships. 

Servicing and maintenance for every size ship — from 
a tug to a Queen— is available at Southampton. Facilities 
for complete rebuilding of some ships and construction 
of medium-sized vessels, particularly for navies of the 
world, are an integral part of the Docks. 

129,000 employees were used in handling 300 million 
tons of goods in 1966. 1 18 million tons were foreign traf- 
fic. Southampton is one of seven major 
ters in England. 

The British Queens, Mary and Elizabeth, who gave 
to the famous "floating palace" passengei 

idvance Oi detailed 



passenger 
scoop up 
Formalities. 

timber, is 
one 150- 
Lold store 



importing cen- 



their names to the famous 
liners, not only catapulted a major 
ingenuity into maritime history, but 
household words with Americans. 
people looked on as the Cunard 
M. S. Queen Man's 30,000 tons 



have also become 

In 193 1, 2(10.00(1 

lane launched the 

ol metal. The ship 

had her final preparation at George V Dry Dock. In 



1940, due to war danger, the maiden voyage of the 

R. M. S. Queen Elizabeth surprisingly took hei directl) 

from the John Brown's Clydebank yards to New York. 

During WWI, the Queen Mary, and during WW II 

both of these magnificent ships transported millions ill 
American troops, sometimes 15,000 at a tune, and 
9,000 war brides with then 1000 children, across the 
Atlantic. The ships berthed often at Southampton. 

After a collision with the British Cruiser Curacao, the 
Captain ol the Queen Mary made the hard decision to 
keep going, ignoring 338 men of the smaller ship who 
lost their lives, in the interest of protecting 10.000 \ineii 
can service men aboard his ship From tin dangei "I sub 
marines. 

Now in their retirement as convention hotels, both 
ships serve to further link the United Kingdom and the 
United States. The Queen Man. "Grand Old Lady of 
the Sea,' in the I'acilic at Long Beach, California, and 



Seas 



tin Delaware river 



scenic beaut) . histoi i( im- 
development and 200.000 
idergone many 



Ms 



dark 



R 



the Elizabeth, '■Queen of the 
at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Southampton is a citj ol 
port, nice, progressive civic 
friendly inhabitants. Vet it 
days along with the entire country. 

The port, known 'during WWII as pari ol bomb al 
lev,'' suffered great devastation. Afterward it reeled 
through a period ol relative stagnation. Even now it 
faces problems involved with Britain's economic moves 
toward withdrawing from the expense ol maintaining its 
position as a great world power, and its effort to recovei 
from the severe economic freeze ol L967. 

However, this home ol the "hovercraft," one of the 
newest transportation developments, is poised loi a 
greater future. Plans lor expansion ol tin- harboi into a 
major cargo port have been announced The Queen 
Elizabeth Two was launched in PMsT In Hei Majest) the 
Queen. When ready For hei maiden voyage in earl) 1969, 

the ship whose engines make hei the most powei 

tul twin-screw ship ever built, will have the highest 

standard ol travel efficiency and luxur) ever known. 
Disraeli said, "The English Nation is nevei so great 
as in adversity." Who can doubt it J 



13 



NEW MARKETING INFORMATION PROGRAM 



The Commerce Department's world-wide marketing infor- 
mation program is as modern as computers can make it. Five 
new reports and publications are available. 

Annual MARKET SHARE REPORTS give you a profile of 
the world-wide movement of each of more than 1100 groups 
of manufactured products . . . tell you who among the world's 
major trading nations is buying what from whom and in 
what quantities . . . give you year-by-year changes in these 
patterns from 1962 through 1966 to enable you to compare 
shifts in your own international sales with total U. S. exports 
and changes in world trade in the same products. 

Modern electrostatic reproduction techniques have now made 
available to businessmen throughout the country the FOR- 
EIGN MARKET REPORTS SERVICE, with ' its on-the- 
spot observations of experiences U. S. commercial specialists 
in 280 cities of 130 countries. The reports range from an 
account of developments that affect the marketability of a 
single product to an analysis of the sweep of a national eco- 
nomy. Commerce receives more than 500 of these dispatches 
a month and they're all for sale to interested businessmen. 

TRADE LISTS help you find customers, distributors, agents, 
and licensees abroad. Each list includes names and addresses 
of firms handling a specific commodity in one foreign 
country; basic trade and industry data with a brief analysis 
of international trade in the particular commodity; controll- 



ing government regulations, and related information. Lists 
of importers and dealers show relative size of each firm, 
products handled, territory covered, and size of sales force. 

ECONOMIC TRENDS and Their Implications for the Uni- 
ted States. This new series of from 100 to 150 reports a year 
will keep you on top of current business and economic develop- 
ments in every country that offers a present or potential 
market for U. S. goods. The reports give you overseas 
market conditions that will affect your business six months 
or a year from now. 

The monthly EXPORT/IMPORT SUMMARIES enable you 
to keep your finger on the pulse of trade in manufac- 
tured products into and out of this country, by source and 
by destination, in the logical terms of the marketplace. The 
traffic in household laundry appliances, for example, is 
reported as a single figure, rather than as scattered entries 
on the 24 different items that usually are considered to make 
up that trade. The heading, "Construction Machinery and 
Equipment" covers just that, consolidating elements from 
such groups as "Agricultural Machinery and Implements," 
"Machines for Special Industries," "Machinery and Appli- 
ances (other than electric) and Machine Parts, n.e.s.," 
"Railway Vehicles," and "Road Motor Vehicles." 
For additional information contact Joel B. New, Director, 
U. S. Department of Commerce Field Office, P. O. Box 1950, 
Greensboro, North Carolina 27402 




Grace Lines — S. S. Santa Paula 



Grace Line's, S. S. Santa Paula, will make her third annual 
cruise from Wilmington, N. C. on October 12. 
The 20,000 ton, completely air conditioned liner will make 
her third visit to a N. C. port in as many years. Grace Line 
hopes to continue to offer at least one luxury cruise out of 
North Carolina each year. The Santa Paula, with all outside 
rooms and private baths is one of the finest and most modern 
up-to-date luxury liners in the American Merchant Fleet, 
accommodating up to 300 passengers in all first class accommo- 
dations. 

On October 12 the sleek vessel will sail from Wilmington 
on a ten day cruise at 8:00 PM and make stops at the glamo- 
rous ports of La Guaira — seaport for the ultra modern capital 
of Venezuela — Caracas, former home of Simon Bolivar. Cura- 



cao and Aruba in the Dutch West Indies are two unique is- 
lands very much in demand by the international traveler and 
the ship makes a stop at each for sightseeing and duty free 
shopping. Next is a call at Kingston, Jamaica, then Port-au- 
Prince, Haiti before returning to Wilmington on October 22 
at 5:00 P.M. 

The Santa Paula is virtually a floating hotel complete with 
shops, night clubs, orchestra, floor shows, parties and boasts 
the largest pool of any ship afloat. 

Reservations are available through any travel agent in the 
Carolina's as well as. direct with Grace Line 1507 K Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. Special colorful brochures are 
available describing the Wilmington cruise in detail. 



14 




Come with me to the Casbah. 



Or the Chateau. 

The Villa. 

Or wherever in the world 

your business takes you. 

And the man from our International 
Department will be there to take 
care of all your needs. Whether it's 
issuing import letters of credit. 
Paying and negotiating export 
letters of credit. Providing money 
exchange. Or conducting research 



for foreign market potential. 
Whatever your needs, he'll be right 
there on the spot to take care 
of them. 

And you can be sure your needs 
will be taken care of with a 
maximum of speed and a minimum 
of red tape. 

Which leaves you free to relax and 
enjoy sipping burgundy in the 
Chateau. Or Chianti in the Villa. 



First Union National Bank /International Department 

GENERAL OFFICE CHARLOTTE. N C / 102 OFFICES IN 48 CITIES THROUGHOUT NORTH CAROLINA MEMBERFDIC 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island - Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 



L. M. WALLACE 

Export Traffic Mgr. 



WADE H. PIERCE JESSE C. JACOBS 

Manager — Import Dept. Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 

Wilmington 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



16 




BARBER 

LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC, 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., P. O. Box No. 6334 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 




WITH 



CARTERET 



• • • 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operator* 



INDUSTRY 

AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 
N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information- 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



}JoiXtb Qanjolkjwob 

STEAMSHIP 
& 
FORWARDING AGENTS 



PHONE 919 - 726-6173 

CABLE "DAVIES" 

TWX 919 - 530-2972 

F. M. C NO 1079 



P. O. BOX 650 • MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



tor INCREASED SAEES AND PROFITS 

Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 
P. 0. Box 1950. Room 408 
Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 



BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, MAN-MADE 
FIBER, SILK 

Netherlands - All types of fabrics for outerwear gar- 
ments. 
FLOOR COVERING .MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Germany - Tufted carpets, rugs, similar floor covering 
mats of tufted material. 

MENS, YOUTHS', BOYS SUITS, COATS, OVERCOATS 

Switzerland - Coats, jackets, suits, overcoats, vests, 
raincoats. 
WOMEN'S MISSES', JUNIORS' OUTERWEAR 

Switzerland - Blouses, dresses, shirtwaists, ensemble 
dresses, aprons, battling suits, beachwear, leotards, shorts, 
ski suits, slacks, washable service apparel, coats, raincoats, 
jackets, suits. 

SAWMILLS, PLANING MILLS 

Italy - Sawed pitch pine, Douglas fir lumber. 

DRUGS 

Japan - Tranquilizer, derivatives of phenothiazine such 
as chlorpromazine, trifluoperazine, perphenazine, chlor- 
prothixene; nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent; cyclo- 
mandol-vasodilator for peripheral vascular disease; anti- 
tuberculosis agent. 

CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 

Switzerland - Speciality adhesives for industrial appli- 
cation. 

CUT STONE PRODUCTS 

Germany - Granite in cut plates, blocks as well as fin- 
ished granite for grave stones, buildings. 

SCREW MACHINE PRODUCTS 

Switzerland - Industrial special, standard fasteners, new- 
inventions. 
METAL STAMPINGS 

Netherlands - Institutional catering equipment: stainless 
steel, aluminum kitchen utensils. 
METALWORKING MACHINERY 

Netherlands - Fastening tools, pneumatic portable ri- 
vet squeezers, especially for tubular, semi-tubular rivets, 
pneumatic portable nailers. 

Sweden - Power-saws, portable power-driven hand tools. 
SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Netherlands - All types of printing trades machinery. 
MACHINERY 

Portugal - Boiler tube cleaning equipment, accessories. 
ELECTRIC LIGHTING, WIRING EQUIPMENT 

Netherlands - Lighting fixtures, specialties for industrial, 
commercial, office use. 

INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASURING, CONTROLL- 
ING, INDICATING PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Netherlands - Flow meters for all types of liquids; mea- 
suring instruments for conductivity or other values, con- 
nected with flow metering, liquids and water supply in- 
stallations; measuring instruments for measuring fluor 
content in water. 
SURGICAL, MEDICAL, DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 

Netherlands - Disposable medical products, orthopedic, 
prosthetic, surgical appliances, supplies. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES 

Switzerland - White printing machines (diazo); elec- 
trostatic copying machines; photocopying machines; repro 
cameras; folding machines for drawings; micro film, blow 
back equipment. 
TOYS, AMUSEMENT, SPORTING GOODS 

Germany - Games and tovs, fishing tackle, equipment, 
other sporting, athletic goods. 
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 

Switzerland - Human hair, raw. 
FRUIT, TREE NUT, VEGETABLE FARMS 

Venezuela . . . Fresh peaches, apples, pears, prunes, 
plums. 
LIVESTOCK FARMS 

Mexico . . . Beltsville turkeys. 
Canning, Preserving Foods 

Germany . . .Canned fruits, vegetables; canned fruit 
juices; dried, dehydrated fruits, vegetables. 
Bakery Products 

France . . . Biscuits, crackers, bakery products, rela- 
ted grocery specialties. 
Textile Mill Products 

Ecuador . . . Yard goods of all types. 
Broad Woven Fabric Mills, Cotton 

Italy . . . Printed, plain hand towels; bath carpets, sets. 
Knitting Mills, Products 

Jordan . . . Women's, children's, infants' underwear, 
pants, clothing; men's, bovs' socks; women's stockings. 
Sawmills, Planing Mills 

France . . . Lumber and timber, Oregon; Douglas fir; 
pitchpine, other American varieties of hard, softwoods. 
Agricultural Chemicals 

Switzerland . . . Fertilizers, agricultural disinfectants. 
Structural Clay Products 

Thailand . . . Wall tile, mosaic tile. 
Steel Mill Products 

Libya . . . Construction steel. 
Farm Machinery 

Brazil . . .Farm machinery, equipment. 
Special Industry Machinery 

Austria . . .Small machine tools for woodworking shops. 

Netherlands . . .All kinds of cryogenic equipment for 
production, storage, transport and handling of liquefied 
industrial gases. Equipment for preservation of biologic 
products in liquid introgen or dry ice. 
General Industrial Machinery 

Netherlands . . . Packaging machinery for various in- 
dustries including case packers, palletizing and depallet- 
izing equipment. 
Aircraft, Parts 

Ceylon . . . Used aircraft with two engines, preferably 
turbo-prop, having maximum capacity of 30/40 passengers. 
Surgical, Medical, Dental Instruments, Supplies 

Switzerland . . . Medical-electronic equipment, instru- 
ments for clinical laboratories, biomedical research. 
Photographic Equipment 

France . . . Electrostatic photocopying machines. 
Toys, Amusement, Sporting Goods 

Yugoskivia . . . "Do-it-your-self kits for building sail- 
boats, rowing boats, motor boats. 
Pens, Pencils, Office, Artists' Materials 

Thailand . . . Carbon paper, stencil paper, pens, pencils, 
other stationery items. 



18 



Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

® Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 




• ••••••••• 

• •••••••••• 

• •••••••••• 

• •••••••••• 

• ••••••••• 

• ••••••••• 

• ••••••••• 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 

W. H. Friederiehs, Operations Manager 

DRY CARGO WHARF: 3.695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 3S feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneously. Additional 900 
ft. of wharf under construction. 

TANKER RERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported bv tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506,000 
square feet. 

OPEN RERTH: S00 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up by 13 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible bv rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500.000 square feet, fullv sprink- 
lered. ROXDED WAREHOUSE space available 
bv arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240.000 square feet, 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building. 
euipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
bv truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All sen ices for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal porperty. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
eonvenientlv located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius) can be used in tandem with either of the 
45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions." 

20 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc.. tractors, cargo trailers. 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top railcars 
possible bv prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easv access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies. Ships Agents, 
Customs Rrokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



A Facility of 

North Carolina State Porta Authority 

P. O. Box 578 

Southport, N. C. 28461 

Area 919-457-2621 






SIIIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARCE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bal 
clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes 
Tractors and trailers. 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes ma\ be used in 
tandem with 150 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port ol entr\ 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacit) 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacity of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses: easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cyanide and acritet fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern-A c\ EC Rail- 
was System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 





— McCOWEN— 



New Man on the Go 



Robert E. Leak, administrator of the Commerce i- Industry Division, announced Ronald E. 
McCowen has been appointed to the Division's staff. Mr. McCowen replaces Mr. Mercaldo as 
Export Development Coordinator. 

Mr. McCowen. a native of Portsmouth. Ohio, is a graduate of Ohio Northern University and holds 
a L. L. D. Degree from that institution. He is also a graduate of the American Institution for Foreign 
Trade with a Bachelor of Foreign Trade Degree. Mr. McCowen has been active both as a practicing 
attorney and in the field of foreign trade. He is well-grounded in foreign trade both from the academic 
and practitioners standpoint. During the past two years. Mr. McCowen has traveled extensively 
abroad, visiting 19 nations throughout the world and is familiar with the trade practices of the nations 
in which he has been dealing. The Commerce ir Industry Division feels fortunate in having available 
a man of his qualifications to promote the sale of North Carolina products in foreign markets. 



Export Development 



After recent successes achieved through trade missions to 
Europe, Scandinavia, and Latin America, the State of North 
Carolina early this year considered the Far East as an area for 
future missions. Newly appointed Export Development Co- 
ordinator. Ronald E. McCowen, participated in the Pan Ameri- 
can Pacific Multi-Trade Mission to Australia which took place 
April and May this year. Other participants were Pelton 
and Crane Company of Charlotte and Strandberg Engineering 
Lab, Inc. of Greensboro. McCowen also visited Hong Kong, 
Thailand, and Japan. C & D is studying the feasibility of mount- 
ing a full-member North Carolina Trade Mission to the Far 
East. 



Currently under study by the Export Section is a reverse 
investment program which would bring foreign capital into 



North Carolina. A comprehensive program for state-wide pro- 
motion of international trade is also being developed, thereby 
creating a serious response on the part of private enterprise 
to expand their operations through increased export sales and 
concurrently project a most favorable "State Image" of the 
progressiveness of North Carolina. Audio-visual techniques are 
being considered to form an integral part of export and reverse 
investment presentations. 



New Publications: "Introductory Guide to Exporting" pu- 
blished bv the U. S. Department of Commerce. This booklet 
discusses how to select export markets, find overseas associates, 
choose channels for export trade, finance and insure sales, 
and handle shipments. This publication costs 40c per copy, 
and is available at the Field Office, U. S. Department of Com- 
merce, Greensboro. 



New Plan for Export Expansion 



Under a new program for "Joint Export Associations," com- 
panies willing to bank together to promote exports can apply 
for financial aid from the Department of Commerce. Congress 
recently appropriated S750.000 for the current fiscal year for 
the program which was first announced by President Johnson 
in his balance-of-payments message last January 1 . 

"Too many firms acting alone, find it impossible to make 
the sustained effort needed to stimulate sales of their products 
abroad," a Commerce Department spokesman said. "By urging 
them to pool their resources, the J. E. A. program is designed 
to help companies expand exports of new products into new- 
countries." 

The program will apply to trade associations, groups of 
companies using combined export managers, groups "organized 
specifically to cooperate" with the new plan, and to groups of 
companies in the same industry organized under the Webb- 
Pomerene Act. (This relatively inactive law authorizes U. S. 
companies to form "YVebb-Pomerene" associations and to make 
agreements covering prices, market shares, etc., solely for ex- 
port purposes.) Individual concerns are not eligible. 

The Department will pay up to half the cost of market 
development and promotional activities for selected products. 
The follow ing aspects of export promotion will be eligible for 
government support: advertising and publicity, participation 



in trade exhibitions, market research, supplying samples and 
technical date, preparing and submitting bids, overseas pro- 
motional visits, training of sales and service personnel, pro- 
grams of product use familiarization and operation of sales of- 
fices, showrooms, warehouses, and service centers. 

Although Commerce stressed that applications for aid would 
be considered on "a case-by-case basis," it also listed these 
"guidelines" for approval: 

• "Projects and products must be suitable to produce signifi- 
cant, continuing export growth results within two or three years. 

• "Projects must be supplemental to any other overseas efforts, 
would not be undertaken without J. E. A. assistance, and have 
the prospect of leading to substantial increase in existing pro- 
duct sales 

• "Projects will not result in duplication of effort for products 
and markets already under successful development by other U. 
S. firms." 

To make a proposal, or receive additional information of the 
J. E. A. program, Members should write James E. Murrin, 
Office of International Trade Promotion, Department of Com- 
merce, Washington, D. C. 20230. 

Research Institute 8/14/68 



22 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

703 

1865 -Years- 1968 

Now 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. Baltimore, md. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



412 Grovicr Bldg. 
JAckson 5-8164 



221 E. Redwood Street 
SAratoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Granby St. 
Suit 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREITEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Montime Bldg Tel (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Vice President and Gen. Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Monoger 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY. N.C. 

PO Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



23 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color Block & White 

Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




MoreAead Cfy 



Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 

■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 



F MX. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704—392-3171 

Charlotte. N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Tra»elers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Nationol Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn. 
of Amenco, Inc. 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAIL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Stre«t 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



24 



fm 



? 




AW 





INNOVATIONS THAT SQUEEZE THE WASTE OUT OF DISTRIBUTION / SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM. WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and seven other 
South Atlantic and 
Gulf ports! 



The 10,200-milc Southern Railway 
System connects Morehead City and 
seven other Gulf and Atlantic ports 
with major centers of commerce in 
the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern's customerized equip- 
ment and methods are designed to 
meet specific shipper needs with a 



dependable, one-management trans- 
portation network that can save you 
time, money and trouble. 

On your next import or export 
shipment, ship Southern — and see! 
Get in touch with the men in our 
Sales Office at New Bern, N. C, P. O. 
Box 909 or telephone 919 ME 
7-6877. 



THE ONLY RAIL SYSTEM UNDER ONE 
MANAGEMENT THAT SERVES ALL 8 



Morehead City, NX. Charleston, S.C. 
New Orleans, La. Jacksonville, Fla. 
Mobile, Ala. Pinners Point 

Brunswick, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 



Portsmouth, Va. 




LOOK AHEAD LOOK SOUTH 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 

10 E. Jones St. 



IUIK KATE 


U S Poitag* 


PAID 


»o!.,gh. N C 


P-..m,i No 32 



N C Li**" COH«SSIO Noz 

Wherr EIGH ._ _i S J, 

we always try to give it 

this kind of tender, loving care. 




HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 



A 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



e Library 
Raleigh 

Dot ' 




Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 



• • • • 



• •••••••••••••••••a 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS - - 

Barber Lines 17 I" 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 16 

Carteret County 24 1 

Carteret Towing Co., Ine 17 \/rt II 1 1 [" 

Coloreraft Studios 14 Y I V I 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler 14 I \J VJ I L 

First Citizens Bank 23 

First Union National Bank 15 f* f\ T 

Heide Company 14 111 

Heide Company Luekenbaeh Baek Cover ^^ ^^ ■ 

Hi-Page Co 24 

Maersk Line 14 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc 17 " ■ 

New Hanover County 17 v 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. National Bank Inside Front Cover _ r , . , 

Ryan Stevedoring Co 1 

Southern Railway Inside Baek Cover T0 Y0UR VERY D00R 

Waehovia Bank & Trust Co 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 16 

Wi. cu • ■ ~ r-< r> a The N C Trucking Industry 

aters Shipping Co 24 . . Z , ' 

_ ii o serves the fine North Corolino Ports 

Waterfront Services, Ine 17 

:X*2 ^„ cy ' :::::::::::::::::: it »<>™ carouna motor carriers assn. 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc 14 STA " Ml * DOUAiI » i - ««"•« • U ' IWWC '*"' CM 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



By Truck 



r 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




OME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



Down to the Sea in Ships 

'DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS, NBC-TV PROJECT 20' 

COLOR SPECIAL, RELATES DRAMATIC AND HISTORIC 

STORY OF MAN ON DEEP WATERS 

The dramatic and historic story of man on deep waters — 
a story of "the beauty and mystery or the ships and the 
magic of the sea" — will be told on the N'BC Television Net- 
work in a one-hour "Project 20" color special, "Down to 
the Sea in Ships," Wednesday. Dec. 11 (10-11 p.m. NYT). 
Burgess Meredith is the narrator. 

Donald B. Hyatt produced and directed the program. 
Richard Hanser wrote the script, and Robert Russell Bennett 
composed and conducts the original orchestral score. 

"Since time immemorial man has gone down to the sea 
in ships," Mr. Hyatt says, "and in so doing he has left a 
wake of adventure, daring, mystery and legend. Our program 
tries to capture the essence of this rich heritage." 

The program treats man's adventure with the sea in both 
historic and contemporary manner. Rare historic film shows 
sailing ships rounding Cape Horn, uttermost tip of South 



America, "the crudest of all passages." Viewers will hear the 
words of America's great clipper ship captains who pioneered 
the way for America's maritime supremacy. Newly-shot 
footage aboard the square-rigged Eagle, United States Coast 
Guard training ship, captures the beauty and majesty of the 
Tall Ship Era. 

Viewers also will experience the power and terror of a 
storm at sea. They will see the end of the Flying Enter- 
prise in 40 fathoms of the Atlantic. At Cape Hatteras they 
will feel the eerie spell of the Atlantic graveyard where 
lonely hulks tell the tale of disaster. 

"Our story also explores the great super-ships of today," 
Mr. Hyatt says, "and looks at the pleasure-boating boom 
that is making the sea a new kind of refuge for millions. 
And throughout the program — through pictures, through 
sound, through the words of the Melvilles and the Con- 
rads — we try to capture the sense and feel of the sea." 

Robert Garthwaite was associate producer, and Daniel 
W. Jones chief of research. Silvio D'Alisera and James Pallan 
were the film editors. Mr. Garthwaite was assisted by N.C. 
State Ports Authority and N.C. Dept. of Fisheries in locating 
N.C. scenes. 

NBC-New York, 9/12/68 



The Voice You Hear. . . 



looks like this, when you call Raleigh 829-3855 - Area Code 919 and hear "State Ports Authority" — The attractive 
voice belongs to Mrs. Mildred Lloyd (below left) likewise when you call 763-1621, Wilmington - Area Code 919 
and ask for James W. Davis, you get another attractive voice (below right) Mrs. Joan Capps. Isn't it amazing how 
hoiv they look as they sound? 






First 

Phosphate 

Shipment 



FIRST RUN— Twenty-two hundred tons of process- 
ed phosphate from Beaufort County mines were shut- 
tled along a closed-end conveyor belt during the first 
trial run of the $11.4 million bulk cargo handling 
facility in the Morehead City port. The facility, dedi- 
cated in August by Gov. Moore, is servicing the 
German freighter "Silvia" of the Ozean-Stinnes Line 
bound for north European markets. Betty Casey 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
KIRK. WOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
L. R. BOVVERS, Whiteville 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAclenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Iayetteville, V.Chm. 

F. H. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Exec. Com. 
H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

A. DeVANE, Comptroller, Treasurer, Secretary 

I. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce ir Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

H. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 

UGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone PA 6-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Hulk Facility 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-157-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

H. N. LARCOMBE, Manager 
WALLACE CLARK, Representative 

Suite 707. 2(i Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code 212) 269-1813 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION ^ 

STATE PORTS 



FALL ISSUE, 1968, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL.15,N0.3 



CONTENTS 





Page 


Down to the Sea 


2 


Export Tobacco 


4 


Princess Sova 


5 


Genoa 


6 


Historyland Trail 


8 


Exports and Containers 


10 


From Caledonia to Carolina 


12 


Exportunities 


18 


Containerization and Packaging 


22 



In this issue we present for the fifth time a continuing feature called 
"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is being written 
for us by Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. Mrs. Casey has spent 
many years traveling, particularly in the orient and the south seas. The 
fifth feature is on Genoa. (See Pages 12 and 13). 



Photo credits should be given to: Bill Hood, N.C. State Highway 
Commission; Italian Embassey, Washington, D.C.; Betty Casey, Ron 
McCowen; W. R. Grace Co.; Hugh Morton; Archives and History 
Department. 



COVER STORY 

The cover this time is a 4 -color shot 
by Bill Hood of the State Highway 
Commission's Photogrammetrv Depart- 
ment. Reproduced here is the awesome 
sight of the engineering masterpieci 
which penetrates the Great Smokies with 
Interstate Highway 40 via the Pigeon 
River Gorge, one of the most beautiful 
spots in all America. 

For more information about Interstate 
40, see the center spread --Ioia on Pages 
12 and 13. 




For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call 
L. C. Bruce, Editor & Publisher — State Ports Magazine, 
P. O. Box 149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 




This is Miss Wool of America from Colorado. Her name is Mary 
Smiley. She recently visited Hudson-Belk's in Raleigh on the occasion of 
her celebrity tour of eastern U.S. While in Fuquay-Varina, a town near 
Raleigh, she was photographed on a pile of loose-leaf flue cured tobacco 
giving us a sneaky way to publish a beautiful girl and a story about 
tobacco. 




William H. W. Anderson, Secretary-Treasurer, Tobacco Growers' Informa- 
tion Committee 226 The York Building, PO Box 12046, Raleigh, N.C. 27605 



Tobacco has an honorable heritage 
for English-speaking North America. It 
was the first successful agricultural enter- 
prise of the Virginia Colony at James- 
town. It was our first successful agri- 
cultural export, John Rolfe, shipping 
some 2,300 pounds in the "Elizabeth ' 
in 1614 to London for sale. By 1630— 
ten years after the Puritans touched on 



Plymouth Rock — tobacco was being sold 
to English and Scottish merchants in the 
amount of 1,500,000 pounds. 

Fortunes were made from tobacco. It 
is a matter of record that Rolfe's efforts 
insured the "starving" Virginia colonists. 
More than that, it was the beginning of 
the British overseas empire. By the time 
of the outbreak of the Revolutionary 



War, the tobacco growers in Virginia, 
North Carolina, South Carolina, and 
Maryland were exporting to the Euro- 
pean markets over 100,000,000 pounds 
annually. 

Tobacco again had the opportunity 
to gain the center-stage spotlight during 
the efforts of the colonials to gain in- 
dependence from Britain. It was a 
tobacco trial, known to historians as the 
"Parsons' Cause", that first brought public 
attention to Patrick Henry, the famed 
schoolboy orator of the Hanover (Va. 
County) "Slashes". While Henry, who 
later was to gain fame for his remarks 
on "give me liberty or death," won the 
case from his former clients, he invoked 
the rancor of the Established Church 
(Anglican) clergy. 

But tobacco had an even greater role 
in the winning the surrender of Lord 
Cornwallis to the French and American 
troops at Yorktown, Va., Oct. 17, 1781. 
Note: Yorktown is less than 30 miles 
from where Rolfe "made" his first to- 
bacco crop at Jamestown. When the 
colonials needed money to finance their 
effort, Benjamin Franklin, then serving 
as Ambassador to France, obtained a 
loan from France to the credit of the 
Continental Congress in the amount of 
2,000,000 1 i v r e s in gold— almost 
$10,000,000— in exchange for 5,000 hogs- 
heads of Digges' best tobacco. 

Tobacco today continues to share an 
important role in our nation's agricul- 
tural economy. It is the nation's fifth 
field crop in cash yield. It is one of five 
crops to exceed the billion-dollar mark 
in return to growers. 

The national cash -crop leaders, as 
measured in terms of billions of dollars: 



1. 


Corn 


$ 2.536 


2. 


Soybeans 


2.524 


3. 


Wheat 


2.000 


4. 


Cotton Lint 
and Seed 


1.600 


5. 


Tobacco 


1.326 



Tobacco for many years has ranked 
among the first five most important 
agricultural crops in value of U.S. farm 
exports. It has been of great assistance 
in the balance-of-payments program. To- 
bacco exports last year totaled 642 
million pounds (farm sales weight). This 
was 17,000,000 pounds above 1966 and 
our largest since 1946. Flue-Cured ex- 
ports, at 528 million pounds, increased 
19%. Burley shipments, at 55 million, 
were about the same as in 1966, which 
was the largest amount since 1927. Fire- 
Cured and Dark Air-Cured also had 
higher exports. Only Cigar Wrapper 
declined. 

The major U.S. outlet for overseas 
sales was the United Kingdom, with 
24% of the total. West Germany was 
second, with 20% 

The overseas sales of U.S. -grown to- 
bacco in 1967 was valued at upwards 
of a half billion dollars. U.S. -grown 
tobacco accounts for nearly one fifth of 
the world production. Note: our U.S. 
wheat crop accounts for about 12% of the 
world output. 



PRINC6SS 
SOYZI 



James (Soybean) Gardner 

Executive Director 

N.C. Soybean Producers Association 

The importance of soybeans, as a cash crop, in North 
Carolina has made substantial gains over a relatively 
short period. No longer can the crop be treated as an 
adopted child, but instead it is receiving due recogni- 
tion so well deserved. Last year (1967) North Carolina 
soybean producers harvested well over 1,(X)0,000 acres 
averaging 25.4 bushels per acre for an income ex- 
ceeding $70,000,000. 

The North Carolina Soybean Producers Association 
has successfully promoted a sell of the "Dare" soybean 
which is high in protein, in the Japanese market. 
In late 1967 an experimental shipment of 2,000 bushels 
was shipped to Ataka, Inc. a large trading firm in 
Japan for market testing purposes. As a result of their 
findings Ataka placed an order for 5,000 tons which 
was shipped to Japan November 19. With an all out 
effort the State can expect the size of future shipments 
to increase substantially over the next few years. 
Already negotiations for future shipments are under- 
way. 

The 1968 crop was hurt badly by the long drought 
and extreme hot weather in August. Yields on a state 
average are expected to be only 15 to 16 bushels 
per acre. This cost N.C. Soybean Producers well over 
$25,000,000 compared to the 1967 crop. 

The pretty young lady pictured here is Miss Annette 




Dr. Charles Brim, developer of the Dare type bean at 
NCSU research greenhouse, inspecting "Dare" plants with 
Princess Soya — Miss Annette Fairless 

Fairless of Colerain, North Carolina. The daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Poe Fairless, Annette has served North 
Carolina proudly by being named as the first runnerup 
in the National pageant held in New Orleans, August 
1968, and representing North Carolina soybeans pro- 
ducers by whom she is held in the highest esteem. 

Research programs the Association is sponsoring are 
paying off. We feel substantial gains are forthcoming 
as a result of the on-the-farm tests and the weed 
control programs presently underway at North Caro- 
lina State University in Raleigh. John Clapp, sovbean 
specialist, has done an excellent job with the fertility 
test this year, and Dr. Bill Waldrop has made gains 
in the weed control program. We feel that research is 
an absolute necessity to reach the goals necessary to 
keep soybeans on the move to overseas markets. 



EDITORS NOTE: 

Today 65% of the flue cured tobacco 
sold in the U.S. to all markets is pro- 
duced in North Carolina 
Not only North Carolina but nineteen 
other states have a large stake in tobacco. 
The entire industry is a multi-billion 
dollar wealth -producing industry, a type 
so needed to support private enterprise 
economy with investment capital and 
job opportunities. Hundreds of thousands 
of people are supported by working in 
this American industry or related busi- 
nesses. Their welfare is not only being 
threatened by Federal Agencies but by 
the unfounded charges of militant anti 
tobacco organizations. We are informed 
that no constituent or component in 
cigarette smoke has been identified as 
harmful to human health according to 
the American Medical Association. 



AT PRESS TIME 
TOBACCO NEWS 

January-September 1967 
Exports Flue-Cured 

All types 

January-September 1968 
Exports Flue-Cured 

All types 



2S2.000.(X)0 
385,000.(XX) 



311,000,000 

425.000.000 



It is estimated that the 1968 flue-cured exports will exceed 
427,000,000 and all types will exceed 572.(XX),(XX). 

according to: MALCOLM B. SEAWELL, Executive Sectetary 

and General Counsel 

LEAF TOBACCO EXPORTERS ASSOCIATION, INC. 




"What would 





5th in a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 
containing her impressions and highlights of her visits 
to Genoa. 







A shipyard: an outstanding amount of construe 
been carried out in this sector in recent years 
behalf of numerous foreign orders 



tion has 
also on 



"In fourteen hundred and ninety -two, Columbus sailed the 
ocean blue. . ." 

With a head full of adventurous visions about treasured 
lands which he was to discover, Columbus left behind him 
the plain litttle house of his weaver father. The house still 
stands in Genoa, Italy's busiest port city, along with a statue 
honoring the now famous navigator. 

What would Columbus' reaction be if he could be brought 
up-to-date? If he could see the amazing developments made 
possible by those brave, epochal feats of navigation, carrying 
him under the Spanish flag, across the uncharted Atlantic? 

If he could view the later discovery by his fellow country- 
man, Americus Vespucius, the vast American Continent near 
the islands of Cuba and San Salvador which Columbus died 
thinking was China? The switch of the center of civilization 




mi 




and world trade from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic? 

The familiar boot shape of the Italian peninsula juts into 
the warm, blue Mediterranean sea like a pier, within easy 
reach of Africa and Far East traffic lanes. It makes up the 
700 mile length and up to 200 mile width of the mainland 
which with a scattering of islands compose the Southern 
European Republic. An ideal position and shape for the 
maritime eminence which has marked it's history. 

The great range of the Appennines runs down the center 
of the boot to its very toe. Hills that ripple out from this 
central ridge — sometimes all the way to the seacoast — are 
responsible for much of Italy's scenic grandeur. The long 
peninsula and main islands, Sicily, Crete and Sardinia, have 
miles and miles of shore-line bathed by mild and azure seas. 

Racial strands interwoven throughout Italy — Greeks, Phoeni- 
cians, Carthaginians, Romans, Goths, Byzantines, Saracens 
and Normans — have left their stamp on the people as well as 
on the land. It is a powerful mixture. 

Italians of the mainland are colorful and volatile, whereas 
Sicilians are fiery. The mountain people are hardy and 
energetic, vigorous and productive. 

Northern Italy is industrialized and Southern Italy is a 
warm and smiling land. Italy's greatness stems from the 
past — it's fabled cities with their rich inheritance of art and 
culture. 

The sacred splendor of St. Peter's famous church in Rome, 
under Michelangelo's perfect dome is the very heart of the 
Roman church. Although predominately Catholic in religion, 
the country also has sizable groups of Protestants, Hebrews 
and Greek Orthodoxists. A recent bill to introduce divorce 
was again rejected by these people whose language has 
developed from Latin. 

Genoa, a picturesque city clinging to the lower slopes of 
the Anennines, sometimes called "La Superba," is a mixture 
of modern and ancient architecture and customs. It is cradled 
in the northwest curve of shore just above the knee of the 
boot. 

The transatlantic liner "Michelangelo", flagship of the 
Italian mercantile fleet in the roads at Genoa. 



^ :•**»>*£ 



lumbus think 
ibout it now?" 



By Betty Casey 



Jammed with 848,000 of Italy's 53,327,461 gregarious, 

excitable, ambitious citizens, Ccnoa is the country's major 
cargo port. It is centered in the province of Liguria, of which 
it is capital, on a narrow crescent of land hemmed between 
mountains and the Gulf of Genoa. This curving shelf of 
land forms the Italian Kivcria. A gay garland of fishing 
villages, and popular resort towns crowded with a polyglot 
of tourists, are strung in the sun along it s brilliant blue 
Mediterranean waters. 

The white wake of tankers, ferries and hydrofoils fan out 
on domestic routes connecting the mainland with Italy's 
islands. Eager hordes of tourist sun-followers are carried to 
the balmy beaches along with food and furnishings necessary 
to keep them happy. Tourism is an economic and social factor 
of enormous importance. 

Favorable climatic conditions in Liguria led to the strong 
development of such agricultural crops as olives, citrus, peaches 
and flowers. The richness of this region is greatly due to the 
flourishing mechanical and metallurgical industries mainly 
concerned with shipbuilding and the manufacture of railway 
rolling stock, oil refining and food processing. 

Genoa is strictly business. With Milan and Turin, it forms 
an industrial triangle. Since before Christ it has been a 
maritime center with fluctuating greatness. 

Now, tall sparred masts and funnels of hundreds of ships 
flying flags of every nation choke the noisy, smelly port. 
With the active engagement of Italy's National Institute for 
Foreign Trade, the Genoese, under the green, white and red 
flag of Italy, sail to distant markets around the modern 
globe — from Rio de Janeiro to New York to cities of emerging 
new nations. 

Three regular lines run by the Italian merchant navy, both 



Intensive flower and ornamental plant cultivation in 
the nursery gardens of the Ligurian Riviera. 




those urn through the Italia, Lloyd Triestino Ilium. i and 

Adriatic. i Companies, and those rim bv independent ship 

owners, covet tin- entire globe Most important are hues to 
and from the Americas, The Middle Fast, the Fai East and 

Africa. 

Transatlantic flagships, th<- "Michelangelo" and "Rafaello, ' 
which came into service in L965, follow a path biased \>\ 
Columbus. Other recently constructed units have enabled th< 
Italian merchant Heel to take .in increasing]) competitive 
place among nations. 

Most ol the ships ha\e been const rue ted in the national 

shipyards. Important is the development ol the tanker Beet 
which currently represents more than a thud ol th< entire 
merchant fleet, Ship construction yards also fill numerous 
foreign orders. More efficient industrial organization and laws 

are facilitating building of new ships which ,ud the fishing 
industry. 

Political and economic ups and downs have plagued Italy 
from time to time-. Hut Article 1 of the modem and progressive 
Constitution of the Republic, established in I 9 I I aitei WWII 
states that "Italy is a democratic Republic founded on woik." 

"It is necessary," said Guiseppe Saragat, President, "that 
reforms be brought forward at once in ordei to help the 
Country overcome the- uncertain balance between the needs 
of modern productive economy and the volume, purpose, and 
efficiency <>l the services offered by the' public administration." 

Now, Italy, fourth populous nation in Europe, is reaping 
the benefits of a new boom. Recent progress m industry has 
brought with it parallel expansion in internal and foreign 
commerce. The 1966 government crisis resulted in establish 
incut ol the present recuperative policy of social improvement 
dependant on strengthening the country's economy. 

Italy, still bickering with Austria over ownership of tin 
Tirol, vetoed Austrian membership in the European Economic 
Community (EEC). As one of six nations members, I tab is 
enthusiastic about EEC and has benefitted from its program 

With the index of industrial production climbing Steeply, 
up 10. 9'i in 1967; and steel production in particular, verv 
good, 18.7'i higher than in 1966; the economic picture is 
looking up. New impulses are perceptible in ever) sit tor ol 
industry. 

Sun-kissed vineyards and olive groves combined with 
progress in science and technology make up a dual agriculture' 
and industrial economy providing varied exports which in 
1967 were up 10'^ over 1966 figures. Imports rose 13.7? in 
the first six months of 1967. 

More than 4000 units in the Italian merchant navy handled 
over 6 M gross tonnage in 1966, putting it in eighth place in 
the world scale. Exports include olive oil, wine, fruits, silks. 
velvets, flowers, soap, chemical products, precision instruments, 
handcrafts and motor cars. 

Scientific research, begun with the geniuses Galileo .t<^\ 
Leonardo Da Vinci, has been carried on for centuries m 
Italy. The country now has plans lor construction of its Inst 
nuclear ship in anticipation of developing a complete nucleai 
fleet. 

A new telescope, near Bologna, believed to be- the- most 
powerful of its kind in Europe is to be useel primarily lor 
studying the evolution of the universe' and quasi-stellar radio 
sources. A nucleai power station is expected to be m operation 
by 1971. 

The cultural life of ltaK was stimulated by restoration of 

the art galleries, museums and churches ui Florence, open 
for the first time since the devastating llooels of 1966. lt.dv 
occupies a special place in the world due to its cultural 
documentaties and great art masterpieces — sculptures and 
paintings. 

These fragile objects are' essential to the- understanding of 
civilization. Florence benefited from the solidarity and help 
of all the world with the rescue ot its treasures from that 
great flood. It has been said that. "Everything it (Italy) has 

belongs to the whole e>! humanity. 

II Columbus could see the world elev clopments made 
possible' b) his courageous adventures, net doubt he would 
be astonished and perplexed. Vnd who knows — perhaps proud? 

pictures courtesy <>/ the press offia oj the Italian 
Embassy, 1601 Fuilet Street, \ AC. Washington, DA 




The beautiful new Archives and History 
Building, Raleisrh, N.C. 



The Best Sailing 
Waters . . . 



PAMLICO 



The harbor at Oriental in Pamlico County is 
often dotted with sailboats. Sometimes graceful 
sloops stop at the Marina to load on provisions 
or to eat the delicious seafood served at the 
restaurant. One is never far from water in 
Pamlico County. Almost half of the area of the 
county is in water — rivers, creeks, and the Pam- 
lico Sound. At Dawson's Creek Lawrence Stith 
of New Bern, has restored China Grove planta- 
tion house which looks out over the Neuse 
River. The river is almost five miles wide at 
this point. The house, once derelict, has been 
reclaimed; the wide porches entice the rockers 
and dreamers. 

For many years Pamlico "moseyed" along 
with its citizens cultivating small farms and 
fishing commercially in the off season. Naval 
stores, an important economic asset of North 
Carolina in the colonial days, are still an im- 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



by 
(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilbom 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and History 



portant natural resource in the county. Much of 
the Pamlico woodland has been bought up by 
large pulpwood companies from outside the 
county; Pamlicoans would like to see this 
source of income returned to them. A tremend- 
ous effort is being made to revitalize the coun- 
ty's economy. All over the county there are 
signs of activity — bulldozers are moving earth 
near Arapahoe for a new country club and golf 
course; there are numerous attractive building 
sites in the vicinity. When the bulldozers were 
operating near the river bank a number of 
Indian artifacts were uncovered. These were 
carefully retrieved and are being kept to be 
indentified and displayed. 

The river banks should reveal a number of 
Indian village sites under the skillful trowel of 
a trained archaeologist. History-minded resi- 
dents are trying to preserve not only Indian 
artifacts but houses and buildings also. 

New year-around homes as well as summer 
cottages are being built in Pamlico and to pro- 
vide trained men for construction work and 
other jobs that are being offered is the Pamlico 
Technical Institute at Alliance. The Institute 
like many of the Community Colleges, is staffed 
by a number of "local" people. Theri pride in 
the Institute, in which more than 100 students 
are enrolled, is evident — they are sold on edu- 
cation. 

There are more than 10,000 people who live 
in this eastern coastal county. They are a clan- 
nish group, often a boy marries the girl next 
door. All of the towns are small and sometimes 
three generations of the same family live within 



a stone's throw of each other. Family reunions 
once a year bring large crowds together and 
afford those present a choice of delectable home 
cooked foods. 

There is ample opportunity for the sports- 
man; there is game of all kinds— large and small. 
Deer bound, bear and alligator are to be found 
in the marshy swamplands, but for those who 
hunt small game only, there are quail, a variety 
of waterfowl, rabbit, and squirrel. The crisp 
air blowing across land or water, beckons the 
hunter during the late fall and winter. Fishing 
in Pamlico County is almost a way of life; Trent 
Creek speckled trout makes the best of break- 
fasts (and suppers, too). Residents fish for 
pleasure but they also fish commercially. 

Much of the county is typically coastal in 
appearance yet there are certain areas that are 
similar to the Sandhills of North Carolina- 
deep sand, scrub oaks, and the same type of 
vegetation, or lack of growth of any kind. There 
are numerous pocosins in the Pamlico penin- 
sula and miles of murky waters (many contain- 



ing oyster beds). 

The Olympia community is becoming noted 
as the home of Americas largest holly tree. 
Though the tree bears no fruit, it is interesting, 
nonetheless, and future plans call for improving 
the road to make it more accessible. 

The county is well known as the site of 
summer camps — two are sponsored by the "Y's" 
of Raleigh, Camp Sea Gull for boys and Camp 
Seafarer for girls. Two other camps are also 
located in Pamlico — Camp Don Lee for Metho- 
dist youth and Camp Caroline for young Dis- 
ciples of Christ. 

Pamlico is unique and strangely beautiful in 
places; it is not exactly like even another coastal 
county. It's a great place to relax, even if you 
do not hunt, fish or sail. The fine seafood, 
especially the crabmeat which is shipped out in 
season (20,000 pounds each day) by several 
companies, is reason enough to visit the count)-. 
Who needs a reason? Not the person returning 
for a second visit. 




I [arbor at Orient 




EXPORT 
DEVELOPMENT 



Both pictures taken during the Munich 
IKOFA Exhibition carry the message 
of North Carolina's international trade 
activities. The N.C. State Ports Authority 
magazine was displayed and distributed 
to the main/ business visitors. 



I Ell 



A European fact-finding mission was recently con- 
ducted by newly appointed Export Development 
Coordinator, Ronald E. Mc Cowen, who visited the 
Netherlands, Germany, and France. 

McCowen attended the following key international 
fairs normally held annually or biennially: Royal 
Netherlands Industries Fair, Utrecht; IGEDO— Inter- 
national Fashion Exhibition, Duesseldorf; U.S. Trade 
Center Show, Fluid Power Equipment, Frankfurt; 
International Rook Fair, Frankfurt; IKOFA— Inter- 
national Exhibition of Groceries & High-Class Pro- 
visions, Munich; and SICOR— International Office 
Equipment Show, Paris. 

Throughout this mission. Mc Cowen met with com- 
mercial and agricultural attache's, importers, and fair 
directors for the purpose of determining the potential 
for North Carolina's participation in these fairs. Em- 
phasis was placed upon agribusiness potential, since 



most trade missions and overseas exhibition activity 
previously undertaken by North Carolina concentrated 
upon industrial products, i.e. manufactured goods, 
consumer goods, and the like. In order to integrate 
future international trade activities, Mc Cowen studied 
the feasibility of including a joint agribusiness effort, 
whether processed Foods, grains, or otherwise. Should 
this become a reality, future trade missions and 
overseas exhibition activity would encompass the 
industrial and agricultural segments of North Caro- 
lina's economy resulting from a joint promotional 
effort of C & I and the North Carolina Department 
of Agriculture. 

Mc Cowen further reported that excellent oppor- 
tunities exist for the promotion and exhibition of 
North Carolina agricultural commodities. The final 
report together with recommendations will be com- 
pleted within a few weeks. 



Exports to Japan 

JOINT VENTURE US-JAPAN 

Integrated Container Service, Inc., a world-wide 
container pooling and leasing organization based in 
New York, has placed a multi-million dollar order for 
marine shipping containers with the Nippon Strick 
Co. of Japan, a new manufacturing firm established 
last year by joint U.S. and Japanese interests. 

Nippon Strick is a joint venture between the Strick 
Corporation of Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania, a leading 
American manufacturer of transportation equipment; 
Mitsui & Co., Japan's leading trading company; Mitsui 
Shipbuilding & Engineering Co.; and Fuji Heavy 
Industry. 

The multi-million dollar order was announced by 
Y. Sakakura, president of Nippon Strick, following 
an extensive tour of major U.S. ports with officials of 
Mitsui & Co. (U.S.A.), Inc., New York. 

The first phase of the order, said a Mitsui spokes- 
man, calls for the delivery to ICS pool participants of 
1,000 units of 8' X 8' X 20' ISO standard coupleable 
aluminum containers within the next year. 

Last year, Nippon Strick delivered to ICS the first 



marine containers ever manufactured in Japan, a few 
months after the joint firm was established. 

Mitsui, which does $1 billion of its worldwide total 
of $6 billion in U.S. -Japan trade alone, is a pioneer 
in developing containerized shipping services in the 
Far East. 

Mitsui tried its first door-to-door container shipping 
on a pilot basis in 1967, in cooperation with Mitsui 
OSK Lines, and was satisfied with the feasibility of 
this kind of shipping for its large U.S. -Japan operation. 

JAPAN INCREASES U.S. COKING COAL 
PURCHASES BY 40 PERCENT IN FIRST HALF 

New York, New York — The Japanese steel industry increased 
its purchases of U.S. coking' coal by 40 per cent in the first 
six months of 1968, according to the Japan Steel Information 
Center, here. 

During the 6 -month period, the United States exported 
6,869,000 metric tons of coking coal to Japan. In' the first 
half of 1967, U.S. exports of coking coal to Japan totaled 
4,902,000 tons. 

The United States is the principal source of coking coal 
for Japan's steel industry. Almost one-half of Japan's total 
imports in coking coal are of U.S. origin. 



"U.S. PACKING HELD 

UNIQUE. ..THE WORST!" 




Seventeen per cent of Amer- 
ican military supplies ar- 
riving in South Vietnam 
were recently shown to be 
unusable because of damage 
resulting from poor packag- 
ing. 

Bad handling and stowage 
are responsible for some 47% 
of all preventable losses in 
U.S. export, and the figure 
has climbed 9* since 1953. 



David S. Kloss, III, 
Grace Line, Inc. 

As a result of numbers like these, Kloss makes the following 
flat statement: "U.S. export packaging has regressed, deteriorated 
and degenerated to its lowest ebb since World War I. 
Internationally we're at the bottom of the heap." At the top 
Kloss places Japanese and West German shippers, both of 
whom score about twice as high in freedom from damage as 
their counterparts in this country. 



CONTAINERIZATION AND PACKAGING 

1. The domestic pack should be sufficiently strong to 
withstand normal rigors of domestic handling. 

2. The shipment must be of sufficient volume to utilize 
container cube and be loaded by shipper at his warehouse 
into the container. 

3. Delivery of loaded container must be made directly 
to consignee. 

Shipments meeting the above requirements are true container 
movements. Handling of product is reduced from an average 
of eleven times to an average of three, thus reducing exposure 
to damage. 

Unfortunately, the condition described is rarely met. Too 
often limited quantity of goods are shipped by truck or rail 
to piers for containerization. Since exclusive use of container 
cannot be granted, the goods must be combined with those 
of other shippers. This prevents through movement of the 
container at port of discharge as may, inturn, conditions 
prevent through movement of a shipper fill container. Dis- 
charge of the container at the off loading port subjects 
contents to same hazards experienced by cargo carried in 
Ordinary stow. This then defeats the purpose of containerization. 

Fortunately the problem is not insurmountable. However, 
the burden of decision must be placed upon the shipper 
rather than on the carrier. To determine feasibility of con- 
tainerization the shipper should endeavor to ascertain the 
following: 

1. Does he have adequate merchandise to fill the container. 

2. Will his product size and shape adopt to containerization. 

3. Is his facility adequate to permit loading of the con- 
tainer on premise. 

4. Do facilities at the discharge port permit through 
movement to consignee. 

5. Can consignee unload the container on premise. 

Sec page 22 




PERSONNEL CHANGES 

AT WILMINGTON 

STATE 

PORTS TERMINAL 



At Wilmington W. H. Friederichs, Operations Mgr. has 
announced that effective October 1, 196'S Mr. I.. (... Smith, 
Jr. will assume all responsibilities as Superintendent of 
this Terminal's Railroad Services. 

Mr. E. H. Fernandes has been appointed to fill the posi- 
tion of General Superintendent, formerly held by Mr. Smith. 
We are confident that his prior experience, plus the administra- 
tive and functional knowledge of this terminal's operations 
gained since he has been in our employ, appropriate!) 
qualify Mr. Fernandes for this position. 



Harry T. Westoott, Chairman 
of the North Carolina Utilities 
Commission, Raleigh, was 
elected president of the Na- 
tional Association of Regula- 
tory Utilities Commissioners 
in Chicago, Wednesday, No- 
vember 13. It is the only time 
in the eighty year history of 
the Association that its presi- 
dent has been elected from 
North Carolina. 




Wcstcott 



BOOST TO SOUTHEAST N.C. ECONOMY 

Figures recently released by the Eastern Area. 
Military Traffic Management and Terminal Service 
(EAMTMTS) show over 20 million dollars put into 
the Southport- Wilmington economy for Fiscal Year 
1968. 

The amount, which includes payroll, utilities, local 
purchases and local contracts, was expended primarily 
in the operation and support of the Military Ocean 
Terminal, Sunny Point, a subordinate installation of 
EAMTMTS. 

The Eastern Area, one of two subordinate com- 
mands of the Military Traffic Management and Ter- 
minal Service, is a tri-service staffed agency responsible 
for operating military ocean terminals and controlling 
passenger and cargo movements for .ill militarj ser- 
vices in the Eastern and Midwestern portions of the 
United States. Its three military ocean terminals ami 
17 field offices, outports and detachments range from 
tin- Gulf Coast to Boston to the Great Lakes. 



//(/</. Information 
Brooklyn, \ J 11250 

11 



FROM CALEDONIA 
TO CAROLINA 



by L. C. Bruce 




LEFT TO RIGHT: Governor Dan K. Moore; Curtis Russ, 
Highway Commissioner; Governor Buford Ellington, Governor 
of Tennessee; Lowell K. Bridwell, Federal Highway Admini- 
strator 



Hundreds of years ago a proud people stood in the 
highlands of Scotland with heads bowed and received 
from their arch enemies the Norman and Anglo-Saxon 
Knights of England the mercy of a victorious king. 
This mercy, known in history as the "Oath at Cullo- 
den", was taken by the chieftains of the highland 
clans and it said that neither they nor their posterity 
were to ever again raise up their arms against the 
British Crown. 

Those who know the Scottish people also know 
that this compromise with their code made life in 
their beloved highlands unbearable. The oath was the 
result of bitter defeat after many many persistent 
years of fighting for the freedom they once knew. 

This event in history is recorded here to remind 
us that had it not been for this oath North Carolina 
would probably never have been the residence of 
descendants of these proud people in such great 
numbers as we know today. 

The highlanders came to North Carolina in several 
waves. It was not long before one of them discovered 
the great landmark of Western North Carolina, known 
as Grandfather Mountain, which so resembled his 
beloved Scottish Highlands. 

So it was on October 22, 1968, shortly after noon, 
Governor Dan Killian Moore stood on the slope of 

12 



Grandfather Mountain and transferred a deed of 
right-of-way for the passage of the last link of the 
Blue Ridge Parkway. This land was being deeded 
by Hugh McRae Morton and his family to North 
Carolina and thence to the National Park Service 
of U.S. Department of Interior. 

Two days later on October 24, Governor Moore, 
a descendant of these same Scottish people and their 
Irish cousins, stood in an area on a line between North 
Carolina and Tennessee and helped Governor Buford 
Ellington open a link of Interstate 40 which pene- 
trated the spectacular Pigeon River Gorge of the 
Great Smokies. 

Surely on these days the people who are descended 
from those ancient Scottish Clans could hear the 
bagpipes playing as the magnificent transportation 
arteries were opened through the formidable moun- 
tains of Western Carolina into Tennessee. 

While standing in the crowd at the Dedication of 
Interstate 40, we began to contemplate that when all 
of Interstate 40 is reality, one can conceivably leave 
the Pacific Ocean at Santa Monica, California, driving 
over Interstate 10 to Barstow, then on Interstate 40, 
all the way across this vast nation into the heart of 
the Smokies via this link, then on to Greensboro, 
North Carolina, where Interstate 85 connects to 
Durham. There, at present, one can pick up U.S. 70 
without friction and proceed to Morehead City, the 
home of one of our state ports. 

When the Blue Ridge Parkway link is completed 
across Grandfather, not too far from the Old Yona- 
lossee Trail, it will mean that one can travel from 
Front Royal, Virginia to the Great Smokies in North 
Carolina by way of the crest of the Blue Ridge and 
Smokies without seeing one stop light to block the 
path. 




Crowd at 1-40 Opening 



Interstate 40 — Pigeon River 



And so it was as we stood in this wonderful western 
land and heard the strains of the bagpipes, we once 
again understood how such slender threads ol 'history 
eontrol the destiny of mankind. 

Do you think it possible that any one of the highland 

chiefs, bowing his head at Culloden in the Caledonia 
Highlands, could have imagined that one day his 
descendants, having ceased using their genius and 
energy toward fighting off the English yoke would 
migrate to wonderful western North Carolina and 
apply these talents and energies toward creating a 
new nation in the wild hills': 1 That they would come 
to master the hills with modern methods of construc- 
tion of modern transportation facilities such as we 
have on the front cover and show on these pages? 





Governor-Elect Robert W. Scott 

To complete the story and tie the Highlands of 
Scotland to other parts of North Carolina we call 
attention to the fact that Robert Walter Scott, who 
will occupy the Governor's chair in North Carolina in 
1969 is also a descendant of these Scottish people. 

His forebearers came to one of the headwaters of 
the Cape Fear, the Haw, near Alamance, from those 
Scottish lands many years ago. 

LEFT TO RIGHT: Senator Sam Ervin; Governor Dan k. 
Moore; Mr. Harthon Bill, Acting Director of National Park 
Services; Mr. James T. Broyhill, U.S. House of Representatives; 
Mr. Granville B. Liles, Superintendent Blue Ridge Parkway; 
Mr. Ronald Ligon, President Blue Ridge Parkway Association 




MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 

W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 

ESTABLISHED 1865 
703 

1865 -Years- 1968 
Now 

EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. BALTIMORE, MD. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



412 Grovier Bldg. 
JAckson 5-8164 



221 E. Redwood Street 
SArotoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Gronby St. 
Suit 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co.. Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water & Market Stj. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington, Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 

RICHARD E. BARKER, Gen Manager 

R. H. FUTCHS, Assistant General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

P O Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



14 



Uncovered: 

A plot to 
take over 
the world. 




Should you be 
involved in overseas 
business, our plot could 
prove very profitable 
for you. 

Here is our mission. 
Our international ring 
has permeated major 
capitals all over the 
world. When you make 
contact with us, our 
tightly-woven network 



of foreign agents will 
simultaneously begin 
working for you. 
Handling your overseas 
dealings. Smoothly. 
Quietly. Promptly. 
Thoroughly. 

Communicate with 
our headquarters 
immediately. Simplifying 
your business abroad is 
not a mission impossible. 



First Union National Bank 
International Department 

(704)372-3456 PQ Box 10794 Charlotte. N.C 28201 member f dic 



GROW GREAT 

with 

THE OLD NORTH STATE 

and expanding waterside industry 

Be there among the first 




Radio Island — Beaufort Harbor 

• 35' Deepwater Channel and Turning Basin 

• Highways U. S. 70 and N. C. 101 

• Railroads— Beaufort & Morehead, Southern 

• Excellent land— no pile construction 

• Surplus Labor Market— Low Tax Rate— Good climate 

Contact A. T. Leary, Jr. 
PA-8-3717 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

BEAUFORT & MOREHEAD RAILROAD CO. 

BEAUFORT, NORTH CAROLINA 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 

WARE H. PIERCE 
Manager — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
1 Export Traffic Mgr. 

JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 



Wi/mington 
Shipping Company 



d^Ma^ 



F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. 0. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



16 




BARBER 

LINE 



Specialisfs in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York — 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland — Tri-Goast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., lilt.'} N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit — Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1001 Woodward Ave. 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



^ WTH 
CARTERET 



• • • 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 
Charles Finer & Teen Piner PA 6-S440 

Operators 



INDUSTRY 

AT ITS BEST I 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



for INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 



Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
(919) 275-9111 



MEAT PRODUCTS 

Sweden— Meat, all kinds. 

CIGARETTES 

Afghanistan — Cigarettes, with and without filters. 

FLOOR COVERING MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Germany — Tufted carpets, needle punched carpets. 

WOOD PRODUCTS 

Jamaica — Picture frames, picture frame mouldings, 
related accessories. 

Malawi— Handles, wood, turned and shaped for axes, 
hammers, picks. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

France — Wood furniture, household, clubroom, juve- 
nile; preferably novelty, small pieces of furniture 
including bedroom furnishings. 

SYNTHETIC MATERIALS 

Afghanistan— Rayon yarn, viscose. 

DRUGS 

Japan — Cytidine diphosphate choline (central nervous 
system stimulants). 

TIRES, TUBES 

Afghanistan— Pneumatic rubber tires for cars, trucks. 



CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, GENERAL HARD- 
WARE 

England — Builders hardware, cabinet hardware, archi- 
tectural ironmongery items. 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Germany — Stone working machinery. 

Iceland — Machinery used in repair, changing of tires. 

SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES 

Netherlands— Laundry and dry-cleaning machines, 
equipment. 

ELECTRICAL INDUSTRIAL APPARATUS 

Germany — Electronic industrial controls. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTING, WIRING EQUIPMENT 

Ireland— Electric lighting fixtures, all types. 

AIRCRAFTS, PARTS 

Australia— Light aircraft, twin engine or jet. 

SURGICAL, MEDICAL, DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 

Brazil — Personal safety appliances, equipment; pro- 
tective gloves, other equipment. 

SECOND HAND STORES 

Afghanistan — Used clothing. 




S.A. CONSTANTIA, NEW SAFMARINE 
VESSEL, ON MAIDEN VOYAGE 

The S.A. Constantia arrived in the Port of New York 
on August 29. 

The ship, owned and operated by Safmarine, was 
on its maiden voyage to South Africa. 

The S.A. Constantia is 551 feet long and has a dead 
weight tonage of 12,370. The ship has a bale capacity 



of 653,040 cubic feet; 1,200 tons of deep tank space, 
and 36,000 cubic feet of refrigerated space. The S.A. 
Constantia, under the command of Captain S. Lester, 
has a top speed of over 20 knots. 

Safmarine is a private, non-subsidized company 
owned by stockholders in South Africa, Europe and 
the United States. The Company also owns travel 
agencies and other associated enterprises. 



18 




How do you go around the world on paper? 

That's a problem you deal with every day. 

Your international business operation depends on 

paperwork: commercial letters of credit, acceptance 

financing, credit information, shipping documents. 

Wachovia's International Department can help you 

fulfill all your foreign obligations with ease. 

We can channel your requirements through banks in 

over 100 countries. And you are assured that men 

who specialize in world-wide banking 

are handling your needs all the way. 

To find out how Wachovia's International Department 

can take your business abroad with flying colors, 

write or phone our Winston-Salem office. 

Do it today. 



International Department 

WACHOVIA 

BANK A. TRUST COMPANY 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




W. H. Friederichs, Operatio>is Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneously. Additional 900 
ft. of wharf under construction. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported by tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fullv-sprinklered, modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonrv buildings total 506.000 
square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up bv 13 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible bv rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500,000 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
bv arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240,000 square feet, 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
euipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal porpertv. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
convenientlv located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity— 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius) can be used in tandem with either of the 
45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions." 

20 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top railcars 
possible bv prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easv access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Companv 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locallv 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Brokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 




wtmm 

Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 
clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths 6 and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes may be used in 
tandem with 150 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port of entn 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacit) 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacit) of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cyanide and acritet fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern-A & EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times 




^^trr*^: 




ETHERIDGE 



THOMPSON 



The News and Observer 



Raleigh, N. C, Sunday, October^, 1966 



Vatican Meeting Brings Export Sale 



By GUY MUNGER 

A chance meeting on the 
steps of the Vatican has 
prompted a North Carolina 
firm to tie up an export pacK- 
age that is believed to be the 
first of its kind in the Stair 

Egbert L. Davis Jr. of Win- 
ston-Salem, president of Atlas 
Supply Co., wholesale distri- 
butors of plumbing, heating, 
air conditioning and indus- 
trial materials, was in Rome 
when he happened to meet 
Bruce Peabody, then working 
on export development for 
the State Department of Con- 
servation and Development. 

During their conversation, 
Peabody mentioned the work 
N. C. State University spe- 
cialists were doing in Lima, 
Peru, helping with develop- 
ment of the Universidad Ag- 
raria and its program) fir 
raising the economic level of 
that South American nation. 

Potential Market 

Peabodv suggested that At- 
las Supply might consider 
furnishing some of the ma- 
terial that would be needed 
to build the university. 



When he returned home, 
Davis turned the proposal 
over to Oliver S. Moore, gen- 
eral manager for Atlas Sup- 
ply. 

Moore, in turn, did a bit of 
thinking. 

Atlas Supply has done ex- 
port business for 15 years, 
selling in Jamica, Puerto 
Rico. Brazil, Newfoundland. 
Bermuda and Iran. The firm 
knows many of the intricacies 
of international trade. But its 
product range is, after all, 
bmited. 

Why not, thought Moore, 
draw in some other North 
Carolina companies, put to- 
gether a package that would 
include a sizable number of 
the items needs to equip the 
new Peruvian school? 

Firms Interested 

Moore sounded out Carolina 
Builders, Graybar Electric 
and Montgomery-Green Co. of 
Raleigh, Myrtle Desk of High 
Point and Southern Desk Co. 
of Hickory. They were all in- 
terested. Virginia Metal Prod- 



ucts was added to the list to 
supply shelving and book 
racks. 

Moore's next move was to 
sell the workability of his 
plan. He flew to Peru and told 
his story to the architects, 
W. L. O'Brien of Greensboro 
and Robert Etheridge, for- 
merly of Raleigh, then to of- 
ficials of the Universidad 
Agraria. 

Moore got the go-ahead, 
quotes were gathered and 
bids prepared. 

So far the North Carolina 
group has been awarded con- 
tracts for plumbing, electrical 
switching gear, library shelv- 
ing and furniture for 18 build- 
ings at the Peruvian school, 
including libraries, student 
union, dormitories, laborato- 
ries and offices. A decision 
is forthcoming on bids to sup- 
ply hardware and seating 
equipment. 

Mcore estimates that by 
the end of this year, $130,000 
worth of materials will be 
shipped to Lima. Quotes have 



been orepared in another 
$700,000 worth. 

Under the plan developed 
by Moore, Atlas Supply pur- 
chase? tjw? maetrials from tie 
other firms, then re-sells 
them to its South American 
customer, in this case the Pe- 
ruvian government, acting un- 
der a program of the Agency 
for Internalicnal Develop- 
ment. 

What are the advantages 9 

"For one thing." says 
Moore, "it eliminates a thou- 
sand pieces of paperwork." 

Instead of dealing with a 
multitude of sources of sup- 
ply, the university can go di- 
rectly to a single source, At- 
las. Responsibility is central- 
ized. 

Trie package selling idea 
extends even to the way the 
material is shipped to South 
America. 

It was assembled in the At- 
law Supply warehouse here 
then loaded last week in Sea- 
tainers, large containers that 
can be transferred directly 



from truck or train to ship 
without repacking. The Sea- 
tainers were sealed before 
they left Raleigh, eliminating 
en route pilferage, a constant 
bugaboo in overseas trade. 

The shipment now on its 
way to Lima will travel 
through the port of Newark, 
N. J., then via Grace Lines to 
South America. Mcore had 
hoped to use a North Carolina 
port, making it almost entire- 
ly a Tar Heel venture, but 
neither Wilmington nor More- 
head City was able to provide 
Seatainer service to Peru at 
this time. 

Moore, who is a member 
of the North Carolina World 
Trade Association, tne Ra- 
leigh Chamber of Commerce 
world trade committee and 
the West Coast-South Ameri- 
can Shipping Conference, is 
enthusiastic about the future 
of the export package plan. 

Already, Atlas Supply is 
gathering information on ex- 
tending the service to other 
parts of the world.. 



22 



What's 
behind 
the Can-Do 
button? 




'You won't find this word in Webster's. 
Only at First-Citizens. 




FIRST- 
CITIZENS 
BANK 



THE CAN-DO BANK WITH THE CAN-DO PEOPLE! 
In RALEIGH, CHARLOTTE and other fine North Carolina Communities • CAPITAL AND SURPLUS: OVER $30,000,000 • Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

I ' ■ 196b 



WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents and Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr. Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 Wachovia Building Telephom. 

Wilmington, North Carolina 28401 oi9)763-5is6 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 

■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P. W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. 0. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 



F.M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704 — 392-3171 

Charlotte, N C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Notional Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Freight Salt's Mgr. 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte. N. C. 



*«*u 




; 



i 



mm **** 




INNOVATIONS THAT SQUEEZE THE WASTE OUT OF DISTRIBUTION / SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM. WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and seven other 
South Atlantic and 
Gulf ports! 



The 10,200-milc Southern Railway 
System connects Morehead City and 
seven other Gulf and Atlantic ports 
with major centers of commerce in 
the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern's customcrized equip- 
ment and methods are designed to 
meet specific shipper needs with a 



dependable, one-management trans- 
portation network that can save you 
time, money and trouble. 

On your next import or export 
shipment, ship Southern — and see! 
Get in touch with the men in our 
Sales Office at New Bern, N. C, P. O. 
Box 909 or telephone 919 ME 
7-6877. 



THE ONLY RAIL SYSTEM UNDER ONE 

MANAGEMENT THAT SERVES ALL 8 

Morehead City, N.C. Charleston, S.C. 
New Orleans, La. Jacksonville, Fla. 
Mobile, Ala. Pinners Point 

Brunswick, Ga. 
Savannah, Ga. 



Portsmouth, Va.) 




LOOK AHEAD LOOK SOUTH 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



IUI> *ATI 

u s ta). 
PAID 

RoU.gK N C 
r.,m,: No 37 



N C LIBRARY COMMISSION 

RALEIGH 27602 



We take 
doggone good 
care of your 
cargo 




HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 



mm 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



Rl 



it 



f jjimx wtuoi Ha i< 



TATE PORTS 



WINTER,1969 




One day we were the leading state 
bank in the Southeast. 

The next we were the 
leading national bank 
in the Southeast. 

On paper the change happened overnight 

In reality, it took over 89 years of 
solid, full-service banking to make us the No. 1 
national bank among a lot of other fine banks 
in the Southeast. 

It took an aggressive and imagina- 
tive management, consistently providing 
our customers and correspondents with 
the most modern services banking has to 
offer. It took an international awareness 
that has led to the establishment of 
affiliate banks in New York, London 
and Paris, and correspondent 
relationships with banks in more 
than 100 foreign countries. 

And now that we are a 
national bank, what can you expect 
from us? You can expect the 
same conscientious service 
that brought us this far. And 
a lot more of it. 

Wachovia 




Bank & Trust, N.A 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 
Member F. D. I. C. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad . . . .Inside Back Cover 

Carteret County 21 

Carteret Towing (Jo., Ine 17 

Colorcraft Studios II 

DuRant, 0. E. Ship Chandler 14 

First Union National Hank 15 

I leide Company II 

I leide Company Luckenbach Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co. . 21 

Maersk Line II 

Morel icad City Shipping Co 21 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Ine 17 

New I [anover ( lounty 17 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. National Bank 19 

Ryan Stevedoring Co I 

Wachovia Bank <N Trust Co Inside Front ( lover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 10 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Ine 17 

Wilmington Shipping Co l(j 

Woodbury Insurance Agency 24 

W. (). Smith <N Co., Ine. . . 14 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN 

SIaii m(adou»iii»s. tiuCuNO luaoiNG iaiiigh 



r 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Porfs of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



The Voice You Hear. . . 



looks like this, when you call Wilmington Area ('ode 919 763-162] ask for Accounting — and hear "A/fiS. BRYAN 
SPEAKING"— The attractive voice belongs to Mrs. Mamie Bryan (below left), likewise when you call 726-3158, 
Morehead City— Area Code 919 and ask for Charles McNeill, you get another attractive voice (below right) Mrs. Helen 
McBride. Isn't it amazing how they look as they sound? 






Grace Lines— S. S. Santa Paula 



SS Santa Paula Plans 4th Sailing 

Due to the overwhelming acceptance of her last 
voyage from Wilmington, the S. S. Santa Paula will 
make a fourth annual sailing from the Port City on 
May 10, 1969. 

The 20,000 ton floating hotel, which is completely 
air-conditioned and boasts all outside rooms with 
private baths, will sail at 11 p.m. on May 10, 1969 from 
the N. C. State Ports Authority Terminal in Wilming- 
ton. 

Ports of call for the 11-day cruise include Kingston, 
Jamaica; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; St. 
Croix, Virgin Islands; Curaco and Aruba in the 
Netherlands and Antilles. 



The Santa Paula is registered in the United States 
and has an all-American crew. Grace Line is a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of W. R. Grace & Co., which also 
has many interests in the Carolinas, such as Carolina 
Nitrogen Co., Ambrosia Chocolate Company Plant in 
Charlotte, Dewey & Almy Chemical (Zonofite) Plant 
in High Point; Ciyovac Division Plants and offices in 
both North and South Carolina. 

Those interested in receiving further information 
and color brochures describing the fourth annual Tar 
Heel cruise, should contact the Grace Line, 1507 K 
Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 20005. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
KIKKWOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
L. R. BOWERS, Whiteville 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville, V. Chm, 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. II. ROSS, JR., Charlotte, Secretary 
H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 






WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

. Di'VANE, Treasurer, Comptroller, Ass't. Secretary 

E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce b Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

II. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
HUGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone 726-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Sup*. Bulk Facility 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Tort Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. II. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 
WALLACE CLARK, Manager 

Suite 767, 6 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code 212) 269-1843 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149-27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE. Director Public Relations also 

Administrative Ass't to Ports Authority 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION fj 

STATE PORTS 



J 



WINTER ISSUE, 1969, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 14, NO. 4 



CONTENTS 





Page 


New Govemoi 


4 


BASF 


5 


Casablanca 


6 


News 


s 


Eiistoiyland Trail 


10 


The Rhine 


12 


Exportunities 


18 


Trade Experts 


22 



STATE PORTS 



In this issue we present for the sixth time a continuing feature called 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is being written 
for us by Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. Mrs. Casey has 

spent many years traveling, particularly in the orient and the south s< as 
The sixth feature is on Casablanca (See Pages 6 and 7) 

Photo credits should be given to: Betty Casey, Hugh Morton; Archives 
and History Department, BASF, C & D, Atlantic Shippers 



COVER STORY: 

We publish again, by popular request, 
one of our most sought alter covers. 

This is the Great Seal of North Caro 
lina, reproduced as designed In the 
Archives 6r History Department. The 
background of" this seal reproduction is 
especially attractive because of the sail 
ing ship and contrasting terrain. 

This is said to be the official seal, 
and since Governor Robert \V. Scott 
displays this seal, and Mine the Govemoi 
of" North Carolina is the keepei of the 
seal, your editor thought it appropriate 
to reproduce it again .it the beginning 
of Ins administration. 

This repro may be cut out and mounted 
on a wooden panel, which makes .in 
attractive desk or wall decoration. 

For convenience in reproducing the 
seal in the Future for our friends, we 
suggest you write us tor info on repros of 
various sizes. 



V 








For information about: 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call I I 
Bruce, Editor & Publisher— State Ports Magazine, P. O Box 
L49, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 8*9-3855 



Governor 
Robert W. Scott 




Governor Scott appointed Roy G. Sowers |i. 
of Sanford. Director of the Department of Conservation and 
Development in |anuary. 

Sowers was \oted one of the 10 outstanding Democrats 
in North Carolina in 1964. 

He took a leave of absence from the Roberts Company at 
Sanford to join the Scott campaign last year. He was a 
vice president with the Roberts firm, the world's largest 
manufacturer of textile spinning machinery. He graduated 
from Wake Forest University in 1948 with a degree in 
business administration. 

He is married to the former Miss Joyce Howell of Sanford. 
They have a son, Rov 111. and a daughter, [oyce Lynn 
Sowers. 



Governor Scott appointed William L. Turner 
Director of Administration to succeed Wayne Corpening. 
Turner comes to his new assignment from \. C. State University 
with an excellent background of administrative experience. 
He holds a B.S. (1948) and M.S. (19501 from NCSL' and a 
DPA (1956) from Harvard University. 
He is married to the former Marjorie Windle and they have 
2 children. 

Turner is quiet spoken and commands the respect of his 
peers. He is a member of the Rotary Club of Raleigh and 
holds numerous academic and honorary citations. 




Roy G. Sowers, Jr. 



William L. Turner 





11 




I 




In 1959 the first International Trade Mission from North Carolina went to Europe 
to seek out markets for North Carolina manufactured goods and to interest European 
industry in investments in the new industrial climate of North Carolina. 

In 1961 BASF, as they are known throughout the world, if you do not wish to use 
their full name, which is Badische Anilin- & Soda- Fabrik AG, came to North Caro- 
lina. They invested knowledge and money and began their North Carolina operation. 

In 1966, they doubled the size of their operation in Charlotte and are continuing 
to show a remarkable growth pattern. 

The North Carolina State Ports are happy to have BASF as one of their customers 
and take this opportunity to salute them during this Tenth Anniversary Year of the 
first International Trade Mission from North Carolina. 




Aft "N> ••** ► " 

Expanding BASF operation in Charlotte, N. C. 




Port of Casablanci 



6th in a series called: 

"Roaming the Seven Seas with Bctti/ Case//" 
containing her impressions and highlights of her visits 
to Casalanca and Tangier 



CASABLANCA AND 

TT A If^JTif^^^^ TT TS* 1^ after ^ years of M° roccan Independence 



Things have changed since, in an old spy movie made in the 
glamorous, international, free-port city of Tangier, Charles 
Boyer issued to Hedy Lamar a seductive invitation to "Come 
weeth me to the Kasbah," giving rise to romantic visions 
of a country full of nothing but veiled harem beauties in an 
Arabian Nights setting. 

Shops in the Kasbah (old walled city) no longer overflow 
with tax-free goodies from around the world. Dior fashion 
shows are no longer staged at La Minzah hotel, and the 
"jet set" has moved on to more exciting places. The port is 
no longer jammed with yachts and sail -boats and luxury 
liners. Why? 

In 1956 the Kingdom of Morocco, almost 175,000 square 
miles with 12 million inhabitants, under the late King Moham- 
med V of the Alaouite dynasty, gained her sovereign inde- 
pendence from 44 years as a French and Spanish Protectorate. 
Hassan II succeeded his father in 1961. Morocco has moved 
forward steadily under its own steam into the modern picture. 

Tangier, northernmost Moroccan port on the 620 mile 
coastline of the Kingdom, located on the northwest corner 
of Africa, became strictly Moroccan. The city was no longer 
divided between France, Spain, Great Britain, Italy, U. S. A., 
Belgium, Netherlands, Sweden and Portugal, but the port 
retained its position in the sun where waters of the Atlantic 
and Mediterranean meet at the entrance to the Straits of 
Gibralter. 

The little city of mostly white buildings curves around 
a lovely bay and beaches rivaling the Riviera which attract 
foreign tourists interested in a quiet holiday. 



The port has expanded. A new pier was constructed en- 
tirely on the water. 

Establishment of a free commercial zone for international 
goods has sparked interest in foreign use of the little National 
port. Tangier has a sizable maritime center and it handles 
an increasing amount of vegetable and citrus fruit exports. 
Plans are being made for construction of a new landing 
berth and a new maritime station. 

A colorful conglomerate of people, speaking the national 
language, Arabic, and Berber, French, Spanish and English, 
mingle under tall palms along the streets of Tangier. Veiled 
Arab women wearing "jalabas" (robes), or "haiks" (loose white 
wrapper), interweave with burnoose-robed men, Berbers from 
the Rif mountains wearing red and white striped skirts and 
large floppy straw hats while herding heavily loaded donkeys, 
and a mixture of Europeans, Jews and Moroccans dressed 
in the latest fashions. Five times a day the Muezzin call from 
the Mosque sounds a reminder for Muslims to pause for 
prayer. There is freedom of religion so Jewish Synagogues and 
Christian Churches also serve their followers. 

Rabat is Morocco's capital city, and the monetary unit is 
the dirham, which exchanges at about 5 to one for a dollar. 
Morocco has three Universities. 

The varied, but usually sunny climate of Morocco offers 
year round swimming on some beaches, year round golf and 
winter skiing in the snow-clad Atlas mountains. This with 
numerous folk festivals, Roman ruins and attractive hand 
crafts increases the foreign tourist trade. 

The annual May National Folklore Festival in Marrakesh 



assembles troops of dancers from all ol Morocco, An lntci 
national fair at Casablanca in April lias line exhibits from 
everywhere and the Theatre and Folklore Festival ai the 
Volnbilis Roman ruins in fuly takes one back to ancient 
days. Native crafts — gold and silver jewelry, brass ware, hand 
loomed wool nigs, leather goods and wood carvings are 
plentiful. 

America and Morocco have been on friendly terms since 
George Washington days when a friendly Sultan gave the 
U. S. a former harem building in Tangier's Kasbah. Owned 
by America longer than any other piece ol foreign property, 
this building once served as the American Consulate General 
and has now been converted by the U. S. Foreign Service 
Language Institute into an Arabic language school. 

Further development ol co-operation occurred in 1943 
when Roosevelt and Churchill met in the glamorous setting 
of Casablanca at the first, and historic, war conference held 
off of American soil. 

Casablanca, the country's largest city, has an Old Medina 
(old port) but no Kasbah. It is a gleaming, modern, growing 
city and port of 10 million population. Its high rise buildings 
and modern hotels over-look a harbor exposed to fickle 
Atlantic winds, but the port, which handles 70V of Morocco's 
maritime traffic, is protected by a three kilometer long 
jetty. 

The harbor's modern equipment 
capable of handling ships up to 9 
can take care of ships up to 270 meters and 45,000 tons. A bulk 
sugar silo is being built. 

An annual turnover of 120 passenger lines and 70 cruisers 
handles 60,000 passengers and 40,000 transit tourists. Pas- 
senger traffic is increasing from Marseilles and New York. The 
nearby petroleum port of Mohameddia which has a refinery, 
handles oil storage and transportation. 

Rapid expansion of Casablanca's port is due to its favorable 
location. It is near water trade crossroads and is a moderate 
distance from fertile regions with orange ami olive groves, and 
mineral deposits, with good land transportation connections 
to them. The city is also highly developed industrially. 

The quay has 30 posts on two large piers. Equipment in 
eludes 85 cranes, 17 car cranes, 48 elevators, 150 tractors, 
250 towing trailers, 3 floating cranes, 4 traveling gantry 



has 6 kilometers ol docks 
meters and others which 



cranes and inaiiv small pilot boats which move more than two 
million tons a year. DOCK silos with 100 (ells < an accommodate 

30,000 tons of grain. 

Mini export items of tin- country are phosphates which 
make up 27V of the total and oranges making up 81. Others 

include manganese ore, /iik and lead Concentrates. 

Figures for 1966 show thai imports ol goods worth ovei 
two billion 100 thousand dirhams exceeded exports bv roughl) 

2 16 million. Important sources loi imports wen- Franci 18J 
U. S. 12'*, Cuba, 8V, and West Germany, 6%. Export destina 
tions in 1965 included France, 11'. West German) v. 
Spain, 6%, and the United Kingdom 5%. 

Casablanca has a 300 meter dock for fishing trawlers. It 

is equipped with a modern fish market with a 1000 cubu fool 
refrigerated installation lor handling lush fish and seafood, 
including tuna. Extension of present harboi facilities are 

planned to meet expected growth. 

The VOUng, independent country is Struggling I" handle its 
national responsibilities and problems. It has long had bordei 
disputes, which continue, with Algeria, and territorial dis 
agreements with Spain. 

Iii 1967 the effects of the Arab-Israeli conflict dominated 
Morocco's political and diplomatic life. 

King Hassan put three battalions ol his best troops at tin- 
disposal of the United Arab Republic in the war. Conflict 
over this at home resulted in departure of Israelis who had 
been essential in certain sectors of activity in the country- 
causing an economic depression and a bad beginning to the 
tourist season. 

Grain harvest was again inadequate— bv 10 million 
quintals. Morocco made massive purchases of wheat from 
France and Spain upsetting the balance of payments and 
producing a deficit. 

Purchasing power of peasants, which makes up three fourths 
of the population, was decreased and internal consumption 
reduced. It caused depression in certain sectors oi the Moroc- 
can economy, particularly the textile industry. 

Much that is fascinating in Morocco has remained un- 
changed for centuries. But in the thirteen years of its inde- 
pendence, the ambitious nation has moved toward an en- 
larged particiDftion in progressive development on its own. 
That is why things have changed in Morocco. 



— Port of Ta. 



w* 





"Lou" Retires 
Will Be Missed 




JbWt**JtMt%C<*e»* 



• HEXLAS AW^c-n^rf^,^ V. .-..-. ^ 

»«£Jt£AX Ma nwrn. ^imfi M cwwn *nv raw uteUta.* 



X£SO£>'£D Ft JtrWFJL Tteko 



XSSOLVED Ft KTHEJL T*m k 



RESOLVED FLRTVEX. Tka *•*** opw </nw jfevr* 
f — ti ttfawrf^ih— teftl* faro l^i rj w *f 

RESOLVED FVKTHEJL 7W o^ ^rtoi **>tex. V «nv I 



_- ■->- _- 



&J. jsr-c 




EXECUTIVE 

CHANGES 

AT 

LUCKENBACH 




NEW YORK. X. Y. December 9-Luckenbaeh Steam- 
ship Company today announced the election of Robert 
J. Tarr to the office of Vice Chairman of the Board 
and Richard E. Barker and Robert Weiss to the office 
of Directors of the Company. 

Mr. Tarr will remain Executive Vice President 
while Mr. Luckenbach continues as Chairman, Presi-' 



dent, and Chief Executive Officer. 

Mr. Barker will continue as Vice President. Traffic- 
as will Mr. Weiss retain his title of Controller. 

Mr. Luckenbach stated that these promotions were 
in recognition of outstanding service to the rapidly 
expanding 118-year-old -company. 



Mr. L. C. Bruce, who has been Director of Public Relations 
for the North Carolina State Ports Authority since April. I960. 
has been assigned the additional title: Administrative Assistant 
to the Ports Authority. 

Mr. Bruce will continue to have full responsibilities in 
all areai of public relations, advertising, special promotions 
and other assignments as directed by the Chairman of the 



Authority. 

The assigning of this additional title is onh to' point out 
the fact that since 1965 he has been acting as Administrative 
Assistant to the Chairman, and will continue to do so. 

E. \. Richards. Chairman 






^ifcft 



*u~ 



%X&'U 




JB 




FISH MEAL 
In 1967 the feed manufacturers <>t North Carolina approached 
tin- agriculture development leaders ol the state, including 
Commissioner of Agriculture [im Graham; (then) Director 

of Administration, Wavne Corpening; and the Chairman ol 
the Ports Authority, E. N. Richards. 

The result ol these discussions ultimately pointed out thai 
there was a great need for fishmeal supply to supplement the 
shortage ol fishmeal on the domestic market. 

Shortly thereafter several companies made a proposal to 
the Ports Authority to establish a facility at one ol the terminals. 
Photographs on this page show how one facilit) appears now. 
as it becomes a reality at Morehead City, and we are told 
that business continues to increase and tonnages continue to 
build up. 

This, we opine, is another example ol how the services ol the 
North Carolina ports help agriculture and industry, statewide 
not just in the port areas. 




Editor Comment: below is exact 

Quote from a brochure published by the 
( I .v Y.Y. Railroad in Philadelphia, 
circa 1889 discovered b> Joel Mew 11 a 
-.tudent at Guilford College in Greens- 
boro. We turned the material over to 
the Department of Archives and History 
for Lib Wilbom to condense the infor- 
mation. We are grateful to our friends 
for discovering and developing this ma- 
terial. 




DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



by 
(Mrs. J Elizabeth W. Wilbom 
Stan Historian. Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and History 



WILMINGTON: 

The Eastern Terminus 

Of The Cape Fear And 
Yadkin Valley Railway 



Wilmington, the eastern terminus of the Cape Fear 
and Yadkin Vallev Railwav, the largest town in 
North Carolina, and one of the most important ports 
on die South Atlantic coast, is situated on die east 
side of the Cape Fear River, and air-line twenty-six 
miles from its bar. In a direct line die city is distant 
but little over six miles from the ocean. 

More than a centurv ago a devastating storm formed 
what is now known as New Inlet; this breach did not 
show itself in the channel until 1S50. when the 
Government made an appropriation of S 100.000. 
Careful engineering showed two water shoals and 
exits in the channel, and die draught of water was 
reduced from twentv-two to twelve feet. 

To remedv diis evil the Government has expanded 
from 1S70 up to June 30th, 1SSS. something over 
S 1.S51.000. with substantial success, securing from 
fourteen to fourteen and five-tenths least depth of 
water at die main bar entrance, with a channel of 
sixteen feet depth twenty-eight miles farther to Wil- 
mington. Combining this depth with average rise ol 
tide of four and five-tenths feet at the bar. and two 



and five-tenths feet at die city, loaded vessels with 
a draught of sixteen feet can go from Wilmington to 
the ocean on a single tide am day of die year. 
From die time diis work of the Government was 
commenced until 1SS7. the total commerce of Wil- 
mington had increased from S 13.500.000 per annum 
to nearlv § 20.000.000 and its foreign exports alone 
from less than 8 1.500.000 to over S S.000.000. The 
earning out of the recommendations of Captain 
Bixby, Chief Engineer, diat die dike be finished 
south to Zeke Island, so as to secure Smiths Island 
from further erosion bv die ocean, with the widening 
of the river channels to their full dimensions of 
two hundred and seventy feet, will probably restore 
die original full depth of water. The company's 
shipping facilities at Point Peter will be good, as 
sixteen feet depdi of water can be gotten there on 
tide. Their terminal facilities will be first-class, with 
train vards of ample accommodations to transport 
their freight to Point Peter, where lighters will carry 
it to die eitv wharves of the company. 



:: 



The recent upsurge in business at .North Carolina's 
ports is reminiscent of the L880's when the railroad 
industry was at its height— and proved it In publishing 

promotional literature. Towns like Moreliead Citv 
and Wilmington were the dead end roads at which 
all cross ties, trestles, .bridges, and iron rails ended— 
beyond lay the Atlantic Ocean. 

In ISSS the Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railroad 
published a brochure giving the history of the railroad 
with a little pleasant description of the towns along 
the route. Sonthport, for which a branch road was 
necessary, offered 'exceptional advantages as the 
great coaling station on the South Atlantic coast. 
Vessels putting into Newport News lor coal go in one 
hundred and eighty miles, and out the same distance; 
Sonthport, from the beaten track, is twentv -three miles 
in and out. Such unsurpassed advantages require no 
comment. 

Wilmington was the center of manufacturing in 
coastal North Carolina. Main of the businesses were 
related, such as the "5 steam saw and planing mills" 
and the "3 sash, blind and door factories" and the 
"paint and oil manufactory." There were also a creo- 
sote and acid works and a naval stores manufactory 
and "2 packers and refiners of tar." 

Wilmington had new industries, then as now, and 
one of the most unusual was the "Acme Manufacturing 
Company, occupying extensive buildings a few miles 
from the city." The business used the green straw of 
the pine (a material which exists in inexhaustible 
quantities through all that section of the State )," to 
make a liber for use in surgical dressings. The fiber 
had countless virtues, extolled in lyric prose. 

The fabled pine was also the source lor creosote 
which "prepared piling and timber against rot and the 
ravages of other destructive agencies." Another con- 
cern was the Wilmington and Champion Cotton 
Company which could handle twelve to fifteen hun- 
dred bah's of cotton in a twenty-four hour day. When 
the Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railroad was com- 
pleted it was vital in bringing to the coast the one- 
time staple of the South. 

'flic population of the coastal city, for main years 
North Carolina's largest, was less than 25. 000 for the 
railroad brochure optimistically predicted 27,000 for 
L890. 

Leading exports in ISSS from Wilmington were: 




Cotton (bales ) 

Spirits turpentine (casks ) 

Resin | barrels ) 

Tar (barrels ) 

Crude turpentine (barrels' 

Timber and lumber (feet ) 

Pitch (barrels ) 

Peanuts (bushels ) 

Cotton goods (packages) 

Shingles 



162,993 

63,473 

2 16,566 

63,163 

21,572 

36,679,509 

8, ISM 

10,397 

1 .5 I I 

6,663,980 



Greensboro Passenger Station <>l tli< Cape Fear and 

Yadkin Valley Railroad 

from the jilts oj the Department i>\ Archil en and 

History 



In addition to the articles listed, other items ex- 
ported for foreign and coastwise trade included cotton 
seed, cotton seed oil, rice, peas, garden truck, fruit 
and melons, etc. 

The arrivals in port for the year ISSS were: 

Foreign steamers 24 26,083 tons 

sail 107 10.7 12 

Total L3J 68,825 tons 

American steamers 95 76,567 tons 

sail 144 40.251 

Total 230 HO.SlStons 

The elaborate descriptions, so typical of the late 
Victorian age, related the many sterling qualities of 
the port city and the railroad. Pages were written but 
not one word told of the bright sunshine and the sand) 
beaches so near Wilmington— and that too was so 
typical of the late Victorian age! 



11 




~^Wi<i feH'-^lW 1 !^! :■■■ 




The romantic Rhine, Germany's river of legend and history, 
has beckoned the European traveller for more than a century 
and a half as an essential part of the Continental Grand 
Tour. The spires of majestic cathedrals are mirrored in its 
waters, medieval castles on steep crags and terraced vine- 
yards lend a fairytale aura, and quaint little wine towns 
nestle in the hills that line its banks. 

But the traveller who anticipates only a picturesque water- 
way as he boards a Rhinesteamer at St. Goarshausen for a 
traditional river cruise to Assmanshausen, experiences an 
unprepared-for shock. Far from being a quiet, peaceful ribbon 
of silver threading its solitary way through a storybook 
countryside, the mighty Rhine is the great avenue of central 
Europe, a hub of commerce navigable for more than 600 
miles through the very heart of the continent, a crystal 
thread on which has hung the fortunes of tradesmen for 
centuries. 

It is Europe's busiest river though only about 850 miles 
long, and Rhine steamers and barges carry a constant flow 
of cargoes for western Europe. 

This great river rises in east-central Switzerland at the 
juncture of two small mountain streams, the Vorder Rhein 
and the Hinter Rhein, in the Alps, and flows through Lake 
Constance on Germany's southern border, then north and 
northwest to The Netherlands, where it empties into the 
North Sea. The upper Rhine extends from its beginning in 
the Alps to Basel; the middle Rhine runs from Basel to 
Cologne, and the lower from Cologne to the North Sea. 

Prehistoric peoples followed the course of the Rhine and 
later it became the frontier for the Roman Empire, then the 
gateway by which barbaric Teutonic tribes swept down in 
great hordes. It was the overland trade route in the Middle 
Ages between central Europe, Italy, and the Orient. 

Through the ages, every army that has fought in Germany 
has had to bridge this difficult barrier. 

The famous legends of the Rhine have become interwoven 
into the history of the majestic countryside, where castle 
strongholds of medieval robber barons rise on its rocky heights. 

The Rhine plays an important part in the "Song of the 
Nibelungs" (Nibelungenlied) which Richard Wagner, the Ger- 
man composer, made famous in a cycle of operas. On a trip 
down the Rhine, one will pass the Lorelei Rock, a huge 
basaltic cliff, where, according to legend, a beautiful siren 
lured boatmen to their death by bewitching them with song. 
Lorelei sat upon the rock and sang sweet and entrancing 
melodies, combing her hair with a jeweled comb, her white 



12 



Romantic Rhintj 

is Booming 
Commercial Artery 



Bij Bernadette llot/h 



draperies fluttering in the nightwinds. A water nymph, 
daughter of old Father Rhine, she remained in the cool 
depths of the river bed during the day, at night climbing 
to the top of the rock to sing. Travellers and boatmen could 




'The Lorelei" 









Pfalz— Ancient Castle on the Rhine 



see her perched on the cliff, but if the breezes waited her 
song SO that they could hear it, they forgot time and place 
until their vessels, no longer guided along the dangerous 
pass, were whirled against the rocks where they were dashed 
to pieces and all on hoard perished. One handsome young 
fisherman climbed the rocks every evening to spend a lew 
delightful hours with Lorelei, his head resting on her lap 
as she sang her siren songs. She told him where to cast his 
nets the next day and he always came in with a big catch. 
But one moonlight night he climbed the rock, never to re 
turn. The river was dragged, the rock searched, hut no 
trace of him was found. What could have happened hut 
that Lorelei took him below to her crystal palace on the 
river bed to be with her forever? 

In the middle of the Rhine, almost directly opposite 

daub, is a quaint little castle known .is the Pfalz. Erected in the 

I llli century, it has numerous turrets, a central dungeon, 
rampart and eight towers, and is adorned with the Palatine 
arms. 

The Pfalz is said to have been built as a toll house that 

the nobles might levy a certain tax upon the numerous 

vessels constantly sailing up and down the Rhine. These 
service charges usually provided their chief source ol income. 
Many so-called robber barons built castles and fortresses on 
crags above the Rhine and not only plundered the country 
side but completely controlled river commerce. In one castle 
there remains intact the dungeon into which stubborn barge 
captains were lowered by rope and kept prisoners until they 
agreed to pay the toll. 

A more romantic stoiy about the Pfalz claims that a fair 
young maiden, Agnes, daughter ol Conrad ot Stauten, fell 
in love with Henry, Duke of Brunswick, and pledged her 
troth to him while her father was oil at war. When the 
father returned, he had already promised his daughter in 
marriage to a member of the imperial family. Agnes' mother, 
however, arranged for Agnes and Conrad to be married 
secretly. 

Her lather banished Agnes to the Pfalz where she was to 
remain a prisoner until she gave her consent to many the 
husband he had chosen for her. In a few months, Agnes gave 
birth to a son. The lather, repentant, forgave the young couple, 
learned with delight of the legality of their marriage con- 
tract, and all lived happily ever after — the babe born in the 
Pfalz living to inherit all their property. 




Traffic 



The Rhine traveller is constantly amazed at the panorama 

ol beauty and industry stretched along the river's banks. 
In the north it flows through the most densely populated and 

richest industrial area ol Europe. Canals link the Rhine with 

the Rhone', the Maine, the Danube, the finis, and man) Othei 
navigable rivers. These canals provide water transportation 
to every port of Germany, and to fiance. Belgium, and tin 
Netherlands. The Bhine-IIerne canal joins the Rhine to the 
coal fields and industries ot the Ruhr basin, chief manufacturing 
center ol Germany and of all Europe. 

In normal years, the Rhine carries over SO million ton'- 
of cargo, chiefly Ruhr coal, iron ore, petroleum, and gram. 

Countless generations of "Rhine skippers" have made a 
living operating the thousands ol barges and boats of many 
nations that move Rhine commerce each year and many 
of the barges are beautifully furnished, some having interiors 
richly inlaid with mahogany and teak. 

So important is the Rhine to Europe's commerce that the 
Treaty of Mannheim of L831— revised in 1868— internationalized 
the river, assuring free passage on the Rhine for all nations, 
between Basel and the North Sea. 



The Busy Rhine Near Coblenz 




MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



703 

1865 -Years 
Now 



1968 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. Baltimore, md. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 



NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



412 Gravier Bidg. 
JAckson 5-8164 



221 E. Redwood Street 
SAratoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Granby St. 
Suit 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 

WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Sieamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

O. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobil Oil Co.. Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO, 2-4232 
Water A Market Sts. 



Colorcraft of Wilmington. Inc. 
Photo Processors 



Color 



Black & White 



Commercial, Industrial, Aerial 
Photography 



Phone 763-6263 



116 N. Front Street 
Wilmington, N. C. 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel (919) 763-8271 

R. H. FUTCHS, General Manager 

E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 

A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 

W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 

P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 

MOREHEAD CITY. N.C. 

P O Box 232 Tel (919) 726-5C80 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



L4 









Uncovered 

A plot to 
take over 
the world. 




Should you be 
involved in overseas 
business, our plot could 
prove very profitable 
for you. 

Here is our mission. 
Our international ring 
has permeated major 
capitals all over the 
world. When you make 
contact with us, our 
tightly-woven network 



of foreign agents will 
simultaneously begin 
working for you. 
Handling your overseas 
dealings. Smoothly. 
Quietly. Promptly. 
Thoroughly. 

Communicate with 
our headquarters 
immediately. Simplifying 
your business abroad is 
not a mission impossible. 



First Union National Bank 
International Department 

(704)372-3456 PQ Box 10794 Charlotte. N.C 28201 member f d i c 



Several members <>l the Ports and Shipping Division Task 
Force of the State Office of Emergency Planning recentl) 
received a national citation from the Director of the Office of 
Emergenc) Planning. 

The citation, in recognition ot outstanding contribution toward 
development of the Mate Plan (or Emergenc) Management 
of Resources, came from the Executive Office of the President 
through Governor Moore's office. 

Commander Howard Janke. I'orinerk Commanding Officer 
of the Coast Guard Croup at Fort Macon (now retired* 
\lr. Richard Barker 
Heide Compam 
Wilmington 
Mr. E. E. Lee 
N. C. State Ports Authority 
Wilmington 
Mr. Walter Friederichs 
N. C. State Ports Authority 
Wilmington 

Commander Joseph C. Fox. former Captain of the Port. 
Wilmington (now of Portsmouth) 

Colonel Beverly C. Snow, former District Engineer. 
U. S. Army Engineering District 
Wilmington (now overseas 
Mr. William King. Superintendent 
Cape Fear Terminal 
Wilmington 

Mr. Charles McNeill. Operations Manager 
N. C. State Ports Authority 
Morehead Citv 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Freight Sales Mgr. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



WADE H. PIERCE JESSE C. JACOBS 

Manager — Import Dept. Asst. Mgr. — Import Dept. 

Wi/mingfon 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Statistics for Port Operations — SPA 



Vessels Trucks Rail Cars Tonnages Revenues 
1968 

Wilmington 638 23.509 7,935 857.297.58 S2.130.287 

1968 

Morehead City 306 5.216 2.724 577.145.00 716.262 

Totals— 944 28.725 10,659 1,434.442.58 $2,846,549 






AT PRESS TIME 



. 



The very serious and delaying strike 

the ILA now going on at East Coast and 

Gulf Port Terminals still remains unsettled. 

Publication of this issue has been de- 
layed, anticipating an earlier settlement. 
The strike has tied up shipping since Decem- 
ber 20th, 1968. 

Latest announcement indicates that local 
groups are going to vote on agreed issues 
this week. (February 14, 1969) 

The "Journal of Commerce" stated that 
the cost of this strike to all shipping and 
industries is conservatively estimated to 
have reached the staggering total of 2 billion 
dollars. 

Meanwhile 600 ocean vessels are tied up 
in all ports. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



.6 




BARBER 

LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York— 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1814 First Federal Bldg. 



Agent: Moreheod City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



INDUSTRY 

AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilminqton, North Carolina 





WITH 
ET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Moreheod City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-S440 

Operators 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

TeIephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



for INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950. Room 40S 



Post Office Bids. 
Greensboro, N. C. 

(919) 275-9111 



GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

Switzerland— New raw materials, semi-finished pro- 
duets, active substances for feedstuffs. 

BROAD WOVEN FABRICS MILLS, COTTON 

Italy — Cotton fabrics, sized, water-silk surface, used 
in manufacture of indoor rolling window shades. 

BROAD WO\EN FABRIC MILLS, MANMADE 

FIBER, SILK 

Singapore — Textiles, including suitings. 

YARN, THREAD MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Malawi — Knitting thread, white. 

WOMEN'S, MISSES', JUNIORS' OUTERWEAR 

Malawi — Dresses, blouses, skirts, jeans, sportswear; 
better and cheaper grades. 

SAWMILLS, PLANING MILLS 

Italy — Douglas fir, hemlock, western red cedar, 
southern yellow pine, pitch pine. 

HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE 

Sweden — Upholstered, other furniture. 

PAPERBOARD CONTAINERS, BOXES 

Sudan — Kraft paper for production of corrugated 
cardboard containers . 

BOOKS 

Switzerland— Books, all kinds, inch old first editions. 



PLASTIC PRODUCTS 

Malawi— All kinds of plastic toys, dinnerware. 

FOOTWEAR EXCEPT RUBBER 

Malawi — Men's, women's, childrens' shoes, slippers, 

sandals for dress and sport. 

CONCRETE, GYPSUM, PLASTER PRODUCTS 

Philippines — Conduit pipes, ballast used for electrical 
installation. 

CUTLERY, H\ND TOOLS, GENERAL HARD- 
WARE 

Switzerland — Tools for cable and wire laying, under- 
ground, overhead, into tube and concrete blocks; 
combination pliers for laying overhead wires; small 
tools used in electronic industiy. 

METALWORKING MACHINERY 

Switzerland — Tools and attachments for machine tools; 

metalworking machinery and accessories; power hand 

tools. 

SPECLYL INDUSTRY NL\CHINERY 

Afghanistan — Small flour mill machinery. 

GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY 

Singapore — Packaging machineiy. 

RADIO, TELEVISION RECEIVING SETS 

France — Audio visual equipment. 

MOTOR VEHICLES, MOTOR VEHICLE EQUIP- 
MENT 

Denmark — Automotive parts, accessories adaptable to 
European cars. 

ANTIQUE SECONDHAND STORES 

Malawi — Secondhand men's clothing, suits, topcoats, 
jackets, pants; secondhand carpets. 



... 



*IFF SCHEDULES ANNOTATED (1969). The Tariff Commission lias published 
an updated text of the U. S. Tariff* Schedules as amended, entitled Tariff Schedules of 
the U. S. Annotated (1969) which became effective January 1. 1969. superseding 
TSUSA (1968) (TC Publication 222'. Copies of TSUSA (1969) may be purchi 
through the Greensboro Field Office at $ 8.00 per copy. 
EXPORT CONTROL ACTION. Current Export Bulletin No. 975. dated Dec. 5. 
L968 has been issued and provides a complete up-to-date index for the Comprehen- 
sive Export Schedule, as well as information on die following subjects; 
—Validity period of a Form FC-143, Form FC-243, or Form FC-843 ma\ 

be extended In a letter certification. 
— Requirement to report requests relating to restrictive trade practices on boycotts. 

Copy of CEB No. 975 may be reviewed at the Greensboro Field Office or may 

ordered from this office at a cost of 25c. 
ATTENTION BUSINESSMEN, BANKERS. LAWYERS. AND FINANCIAL W 
TERS: We have copies free of charge of the Dec;. 3 speech made by Charles E. Fiero, 
Director, Office of Foreign Direct Investments, at the 1 Annual Tax Conference of thi 
Tax Foundation, Inc., at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. New York, entitled THE 
FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT PROGRAM AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO 
THE F. S. BALANCE OF PAYMENTS. If you need a copy, call 273-8234. We will 
mail it to you. 






18 



Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958. 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




W. H. Fricderichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneously. Additional 
900 ft. of wharf under construction. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported bv tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fullv-sprinkiered, modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506,000 
square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up by 13 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 500,000 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 240,000 square feet, 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
equipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal property. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
conveniently located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius ) can be used in tandem with either of 
the 45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions. 



20 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top railcars 
possible by prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Brokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 





Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIFSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1908. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 

terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lilts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 

T clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes 
Tractors and trailers, 
m 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes ma) be used in 
tandem with 150 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port ol entr) 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacity ol 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cvanidc> and acritet fumigation facilities. Two 9,000 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served b\ the Southern- \ c\ EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 

plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Securit> force on duty .it all times. 




f h Southport 





►-<.••'•'' 38 








••"' 38 


33 . 


•'... 




38 .• 


• •■ 


3 


38 
>9 


■1$\ 


1 


^- 



Blue Ribbon 
List Of World 
Trade Experts 

Visit Raleigh 



Courtesy of North Carolina State University, Officer of 
Information Services, Hardy D. Berry, Director 



A major conference on international trade, held by 
North Carolina State University in January, stressed 
exports in general and agricultural exports in particu- 
lar as they affect the Southern region of the United 
States. 

The 15 Southern states constitute the leading 
region of the nation in volume of agricultural exports, 
exporting S 2 billion annually, one-third of the na- 
tion's total agricultural exports. 

Some of the foremost economists from government, 
industry and education pointed to lost opportunity 
in export trade because of lack of interest in what 
most speakers described as an enormous overseas 
market. 

Dr. R. L. Beukenkamp, coordinator of export 
services for the U. S. Department of Agriculture, 
declared that American technology in food processing 
could supply the demand in many regions of the 
world where no U. S. export trade now exists. 

The soundness of the American economy and cur- 
rent trade policies were discussed by Dr. Howard 
S. Piquet, specialist in international economics. 

Piquet recently ended 22 years as senior specialist in 
international economics of the legislative reference 
service of the Library of Congress. In that capacity, 
he served as adviser to congressional committees and 
to both houses of Congress. 

He emphasized that liberal foreign trade policies 
by industrialized nations are essential for international 
economic balance. 




left to right: Linda Shaver and Joan Pickard are the girls who 
registered the attendants at the conference on International 
Trade held here recently. It appears that Mrs. Shaver is 
making laces at the photographer? 

Piquet declared that programs designed to restrict 
U. S. private direct investment abroad are self-defeat- 
ing. 

"We are being told that a comprehensive system 
of import quotas is necessary to help eliminate the 
balance-of-pavments deficit," Piquet said. 

"The truth lies in exactly the opposite direction." 

"Liberal international trade policies are essential 
to the balance-of-pavments problem." 

He said that estimates on U. S. abandonment of 
all tariffs and import quotas reveal that only .3 to 
.6 percent of the country's work force would have to 
adjust to new jobs, less than the percentage normally 
affected by technological changes in production. 

J. Carl Clamp jr., senior vice president of the Allis 
Chalmers Manufacturing Company, expressed much 
the same attitude as Piquet. 

He said that 12.5 percent of his corporation's 
total sales are in world trade. 

Of the $870 million in total sales by Allis Chalmers 
last year, $ 60 million was in export trade and •$ 67 
million was in overseas manufacturing operations. 

The conference on international trade was spon- 
sored by the Agricultural Policy Institute of the School 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences at N. C. Siate Uni- 
versity. Funded by the Kellogg Foundation, the pri- 
mary purpose of the Institute is to collect and dis- 
seminate information on economic adjustment in the 
South. 



22 



Dr. James Maddux, director of the Institute, noted 
that dining the summer ol 1908, the value ol I . S. 
agricultural exports since World War II passed the 
$ 100 billion mark. 

lie said emphasis has switched from government- 
sponsored agricultural shipments to regular commer- 
cial sales lor U. S. dollars. 

A fairly stable relationship has been maintained 
between the value of agricultural and total (.'. S. 
exports, with agricultural exports making up about 
25 percent of the total. 

The constant attention of producers, processors, 
exporters, public officials, educators and others in- 
volved in the various facets of world trade are re- 
quired to keep up with (he rapid changes occurring 
in world affairs, Maddox said. 

Other government speakers at the conference in- 
cluded Robert L. Hirshberg, director lor the Office 
of Commercial and Financial Policy, Bureau of Inter- 
national Commerce; Dr. Quentin M. West, director, 
foreign Regional Analysis, U. S. Department of 
Agriculture; Howard L. Worthington, director, Office 
of International Trade, Department of State; and 



Dr. Ilannan K/ekiel. Chief, Financial Studies, Intel 

national Monetarv fund. 

Industry guest spe.ikeis .it the conference were: 
Dr. Carroll Brunthaver, vice president ol Cook and 
Company; William Pearce, vice president ol < argill 
Inc.; Anthoiiv B. Brannock, president ol the Raleigh 
Based Cemco Enterprises; and |. Edward k.nk vici 
president ol the V ( .. National bank and President 
of the X. C. World Trade Association. 

Speakers from educational institutions included Di 
D. Gale Johnton, dean of the School ol Soi ill Sc iences, 
University of Chicago; Dr. Vernon I.. Sorenson pro 
lessor ol agricultural economics, Michigan SI. ii< I iii 
versitv: Dr. C. E. Bishop, vice president ol the I ni 
\ (is it \ of North Carolina; Dr. |ohn I. Caldwell 
chancellor of North Carolina State t niversity, <u\<\ 
Dr. H. Brooks fames, head of the NCSU School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

The conference planning committee was headed 
bv Dr. R. (diaries Brooks. Department of Economics, 
North Carolina State Universit) . 

— gloria jones — 



Seminar drew 




WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents and Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr., Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 WACHOVIA BUILDING 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 28401 



TELEPHONE 
(919) 763-5186 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 



F.M.C. No. 70 



OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-031 2 



FM.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704 — 392-3171 

Charlotte, N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank BldQ. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News. Va. 
P. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 



A. C. SMITH 

Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



^rlA^ll 



F.M.C. 469 



STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



24 



BEAUFORT-MOREHEAD RAILROAD 

Serves Radio Island 

and the Deepwater Port, Nearest to the 

Open Sea 
IN MID-AMERICA 

Look at this Photo . . . 




Beaufort Harbor at Morehead City 
Radio Island 



Land Lease Arrangements 
Tank and Liquid 

Import-Export Terminal Leases 
Construction for all types of Liquid 

Ocean Shipping, Planning and 

Financing Available 
Located within 500 miles of 50% 

of the population of the United States 



Write or Call 

A. T. LEARY JR. 

16 Broad Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

Telephone: (919) 728-2131 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



BULK KATE 
U S Ponag* 

PAID 
BoL.gh, N C. 
P*imit No 32 



Itmayseemabit 
olcHashioned, 
but at Heide we 
still believe in 
service. 



XZ 



XX 

X 

2> 

ox 



o 

o 



en 






o 

o 





Jason A. Luckenbach, age 7, shipbmlde 



HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 
(A Division of Luckenbach 
Steamship Co.) 



mm 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



''fai/t c&wUaa, 




SPRING, 1969 





Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 17 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 23 

Carteret County 24 

Carteret Towing Co., Ine 17 

DuBant, O. F. Ship Chandler 14 

First Citizens Bank L5 

First Union National Bank 15 

Ileide Company 14 

Heide Company Luckenbach Back Cover 

pi-Page Co 24 

Litho Industries, Ine 14 

Maersk Line 14 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Ine 17 

New Hanover County 17 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn I 

N. C. National Bank Inside Front Cover 

Ryan Stevedoring (Jo 1 

Southern Railway Inside Back Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 16 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Ine 17 

Wilmington Shipping Co 16 

Woodbury Insurance Agency 24 

W. O. Smith & Co., Inc. 14 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Carolina Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN. 

STAU HIADOUAtTlly tluCKINC IUII.DING lAlfIGH 



r 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Urges You to See Why We 

Have Faith in Young America 

AMERICA'S JUNIOR MISS 

NBC-TV MAY 6 
7:30 PM EASTERN TIME 
6:30 PM CENTRAL TIME 




V. 



Live and in Color from Our "Home Port"— Mobile 



The I bice You Hear. . . 



looks like this, when you call Wilmington Area Code 919 763-1621 ask for Mr. Hardaway or Engineering — 
and hear "Miss Fountain Speaking" — The attractive voice belongs to Miss Dorothy Fountain (below left), 
likewise when you call 726-3158, Morehead City — Area Code 919 and ask for Jim Edmundson, you get 
another attractive voice (below riglit) Mrs. Beaulah Modlin. Isn't it amazing how they look as they sound? 






The wharf at Morehead City and Wilmington have both been congested 
with traffic since the end of the Longshoremans Strike in March. Things are 
still not settled down to the steady pace of normalcy, but hardwork and 
orderliness have prevailed. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
KIRKWOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
L. H. BOWERS, Whiteville 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville, \ . Chm. 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
WILLIAM PHARR, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. II. ROSS, JH., Charlotte, Secretary 
II. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION fj 

STATE PORTS 



2 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

DeVANE, Treasurer, Comptroller, Ass't. Secretary 

C, LEE, JR., Director of Commerce ■!_■ T.xec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
RAY MATTIIIS, Representative 

H. C:. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
BGH HARDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



SPRING ISSUE, L969, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 15. NO. 1 



CONTENTS 



MOREIIEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Telephone 726-3158 

TWX 510-92 4-298.'] 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Bulk Facility 



P V.I 

3 Capitols l 

Blueberries and Queen 5 

Bremer I la\ en 6 

History-land Trail 12 

Exportunities IS 

Port Infoniiatioii 20 



In this issue ice present for the sci enth time a continuing feature called 

"Roaming the Seoen Seas with Betty Casci/." The featuri is being written 

for us hi/ Mr\. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. Mrs. Casey has 

tent maiui years lra\ eling, varticuUirht in the uncut and the south was. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P. (). Rov 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. II. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



Photo credits should be given to: NCSU Print Shop; Tryon Palace ( om- 
mission; and for the Old Capitol Painting (from the hook. North Carolina's 
Capital, Raleigh— The Junior League of Raleigh, Elizabeth C. Waugh and 
UNC Press, Chapel Hill; Seco, N.C. Dept. of Archives and Histor) 



Tryon Palace 

The cover is composed ol three pic 
COVER: tm, ' s °l three capitol buildings of North 

Carolina. The first one is Trvon Palace. 
Three Capitol Buildings Of This has been restored, as you know 

North Carolina 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P O. Rox 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

WALLACE CLARK. Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York. N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code 212) 269-1843 




lor many years and is one ol the show 
places of North Carolina, located in 
New Bern. It was the home and the 
place of operations ol the government 
and the Governor of North Carolina 
for the years prior to the Revolution. 

Old Capitol 

The other building is the Old Capitol, 
which burned in 1831. This building was 
typical of the construction of that era, It 
reminds UNC old grads ol the type ol 
construction seen in the old buildings at 
the University of North Carolina. This 
is a photograph ol a painting done b\ 
[acob Marling and is one ol the few 
existing reproductions ol this fine old 
building. 
PRESEh T ( \/7 /•()/. 

The other picture, ol course, is e.isih 

recognizable as the present Capitol. For 
further details see stor\ on Page 4. 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. [ones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 
Box 149—27602 
Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations also 
Administrative Ass't to Ports Authority 




For information about 
THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write or call I I 
Bruce, Editor c\ Publisher— State Potts Magazine, P. O. Box 
149. Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 

3 




Three Capitol Buildings = 

Three Ways to Select Governors 



Governor Robert W. Scott 

In this issue we show three famous buildings from 
North Carolina history. Behind this display lies a long 
tradition of Governors and a fine tradition of good 
government. 

The first photograph shows Trvon Palace, named for 
Governor Richard Trvon, who was a Roval Governor of 
the Colonv of North Carolina. Being a representative of 
rovaltv, some thought it fitting; that his office be housed 
in a palace. 




As we all know the American revolution of 1776 
changed these ideas. Then , Governors of North Carolina 
were for vears housed in modest homes, but dieir offices 
were contained in a building that also housed the state 
General Assembly. This was true of Building Number 2, 
which was the Old Capitol. Governors who served in 
this building were elected bv the General Assembly. It 
burned in 1831. 

The earlv North Carolina concept was for the General 
Assembly to control the state and delegate powers to the 
executive branch, represented bv the Governor, to execute 
laws passed bv the General Assemblv who, in turn, derived 
their powers from the people. 

Bear in mind that in those days not all of the people 
over twentv-one vears of age could qualify or were 
franchised. 

In 1840 when the present building was completed the 
Governor and General Assemblv moved into it. 

Then came the war between the states and the sub- 
sequent struggles to restore orderlv government in the 
state and, finally, the concept that the Governors should 
be elected bv the people. So with change in the Con- 
stitution of 1868, Governors could serve for four-year 
terms, elected bv the people, but could not succeed 



themselves and could be re-elected onlv after at least a 
four-year lapse. Zeb Vance is the onlv Governor in this 
group who has been re-elected. 

Somewhere during this period the General Assembly 
also refused to give die Governor of North Carolina the 
power of veto, and the people supported this point of 
view with their Constitution. 

Between 1959 and 1963 another building appeared on 
the North Carolina scene. This building, not shown 
here, is called die State Legislative Building. This began 
an era in which the General Assembly and the Governor 
operated from separate buildings. It also began the thinking 
that the Constitution should be changed and that the 
people should be asked to give the Governor the right 
of veto and the right to succeed himself. Finally, in 1969. 
bills have been, or are said to be readv to be, introduced 
that will ask the people if thev want these changes. 

In 1969, a year of unrest everywhere, the North Caro- 
lina General Assemblv. according to the media, is faced 
with varied decisions. Sources of new taxes, larger 
appropriations, mixed beverages, higher interest rates, 
travel and industrv promotion, and more education. The 
majority of the media seems content to discuss and report 
on taxes, beverage laws, or mo\ie laws. However, this* 
reporter believes the most important decisions before the 
General Assembly of 1969 will be the ones proposed to 
amend the constitution. 

If the Constitution is changed by a vote of the people, 

then Governor Scott, may be the last of the governors 

who could not succeed to the office without an intervening 

term bv another. 




Carol Anne Bass 

N.C. Blueberry 
Queen 1 

To Be Held at Elizabethtown— White Lake, N. C. 
May 22, 23, and 24, 1969 

The Blueherry Festival of North Carolina, a non- 
profit corporation, has been ehartered through the 
combined efforts of thirteen Southeastern North 
Carolina counties for the purpose of promoting the 
Blueberry Industry, Commeree, Agrieulture, Travel 
and Tourism, and in general, the Southeastern 
portion of North Carolina. 

With an annual value in excess of $4 million, 
Blueberry culture is the second largest fruit enter- 
prise in North Carolina, this income being derived 
from some 4,(X)() acres of plants. 

North Carolina is the third largest high bush 
blueberry producing state in the nation. Commer- 
cial production in North Carolina is primarily in 
Pender, Bladen, Duplin, Jones, Craven and sur- 
rounding counties. There are also a few areas of 
commercial planting in the mountains. Account No. 

819. 

White Lake, N. C, because of its central loca- 
tion in the Blueberry production area, has been 
chosen as the center of attraction for the festivities. 
The 1969 Festival is slated for the 22nd, 23rd, and 
24th of May. A "fun-packed" three-day gala affair 
at "The Lake" will afford entertainment and ed- 
ucation for all who attend. Highlights of the event 
include: The Queen's Pageant, 100 unit parade, 
Golf Tournament, Teenage Dance, Blueberry Ball, 




§■■■■■■1 

Water Show, Fried Chicken from the World's 
largest frying pan and many, many other interesting 
attractions. 

The 1969 Queen, Miss Carol Ann Bass, an attractive 
brunette from Salemburg, N. C, is the second most 
traveled queen in North Carolina. She has traveled 
into 20 states and made numerous appearances 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific. Recently she appeared 
in Hollywood on ABC's "The Dating Came" and 
the "Joey Bishop Show." 

Carol Ann is presently a special student at South- 
wood College in Salemburg and hopes to receive 
a degree in elementarv education by attending 
East Carolina Universitv. 

Remember the dates May 22nd, 23rd, and 
24th. 



COMMERCE NOTES 



$.50 BILLION UNITED STATES EXPORT GOAZ^-S ecretary 

of Commerce Stans, also chairman of the Cabinet Committee 
on Export Expansion, has just recently announced an annual 
export goal of $50 billion to be reached by 1973. Although 
this goal is challenging, it is feasible based on our historical 
export growth, and it is necessary to improve our trade 
balance and international balance of payments. This $50 
billion goal compares with 1968 U. S. exports of slightly 
less than $34 billion and would represent approximately 4.3'i 
of GNP compared to 4* the 1968 $34 billion figure represents. 
The goal was established for the purpose of stimulating both 
business and government efforts toward greater export growth. 
Along with this goal, the Cabinet Committee on Export 
Expansion has set up a working group on export financing, 
another group on export tax incentives, and has established 
an Export Strategy Committee. These actions have been taken 
because of their potential for immediate export stimulation. 

SELLING TO /APAN— Japan's sustained economic growth, 

rising living standards, and tight labor supply are pushing the 
country's food processing and packaging industry to record 
production and creating an unprecedented demand for food- 
serving equipment. To help U. S. manufacturers increase sales 
by introducing ami promoting products for these industries in 
this prosperous market, the V. S. Department of Commerce 



will stage a commercial exhibition of food processing, packag 
ing and serving equipment in Osaka, [apan, fulj -1 25 
Market research by the Department of Commerce shows a 
dramatic advance in frozen food production in [apan's ex- 
panding food processing industry, and a market tor advanced 
and large capacity packaging machines. In addition, the 
demand for food-serving equipment is outstripping [apanese 
production. North Carolina firms tliat vv.mt to exhibit at 
Osaka should get in touch with the Greensboro Field Office. 

NEW U. S. TRADE CENTER IN PARIS TO OPEN Oh 
NOVEMBER I7T1I— The U. S. Department of Commerce 

will open its seventh and largest (J. S. Trade (enter overseas 
on November IV in Paris, France, with a premiere exhibition of 
advanced laser equipment. The Paris Trade Center, operated 
by die Commerce Department's Bureau of Intel national Com- 
merce (BIC), will be the newest showcase in an export 
promotion program that has brought U. S. manufacturers 

more than $193 million in foreign sales through Trade Centei 
exhibitions since 1961. Located at the heart of one ot 
America's major foreign markets, the Tans Center will begin 
operations with a series of exhibitions of high-technologj 
products eagerly sought b) French industry. American -French 
trade exceeded Si! billion in 1968. l s. sales to France were 
$1.3 billion, and French exports to the United States were 
$766 million. 




The Overseas Harbour 



Pictures courtesy German Embassy Shipping and 
Counselor and Bremen Tourist Association 



Aviation 



"Bremische-Hafen- 



7th in a series called: 
"Roaming the Seven Seas 
with Betty Casey" 



Forty Miles of Harbors 



"Bremische-Hafen" are bustling harbors packed along a 
fort} - mile stretch of Weser river plunged like a long crumpled 
dagger into the shape of West Germany from its short, 
shallow, irregular North Sea coastline. 

The city of Bremen, population over 600,000, German's 
oldest port, spreads along 2o miles at the head of the river; 
and Bremerhaven, the International port, population 145.000. 
runs for ten miles along the right bank at its mouth. These 
cities are in Bremen, the smallest of Germany's six states. 
Since both ports belong to the State-Citv of Bremen, thev 
are called "Bremische-Hafen." which means all ports of the 
State-City. 

Although Bremen lies some 40 miles from the coast, ebb 
and flood go up to and bevond the city, allowing ocean- 
going ships to make fast right at the heart of things. Bevond 
the bridges, river vessels join the inland waterway system to 
penetrate deep into the interior. 

Bremen has a total of 23 deep water harbours, basins and 
specialized anchorage points. Seventeen of these, in Bremen 
proper, are the most characteristic and important. Apart from 
these, there are a number of other anchorage points along 
the river, and a further group of harbours on the coast 40 
miles downstream at Bremerhaven. 

In the five ports of the lower Weser, about 20 million 
tons of cargo are handled each year. Two thirds of this cargo 
moves into Bremen. 

The ports of Bremen and of Bremerhaven, although forming 
two distinct harbor groups, are inseparable from each other 
and work as a single unit. Bremernaven's position on the 
coast and a unique "railway on the sea" have made it the 
leading port in Germany for passenger traffic and the largest 
continental fishing harbor. The Port of Bremen, with its 
centuries-old tradition, is the second largest seaport in 
Germany. 



Two of Bremen's most important docks are the "Overseas" 
and "Europe" harbors. These are operated as free ports offering 
many advantages to international trade as customs-free zones. 

They are principally used for Bremen's characteristic im- 
ports: Cotton from the United States, Egypt, Western Asia, 
India and 35 other cotton -growing countries; wool from South 
Africa, South and Central America, Australia and New 
Zealand; tobacco from the United States, Brazil and Indonesia. 
They handle coffee from South and Central America, the 
West and East Indies and East Africa. 

The free harbors feature Bremen's special type of harbor 
construction, known as the "Bremen system." The ships are 
berthed in a long line along the extensive quays, side by side 
with four separate rail tracks. Electric cranes, so numerous 
that they form an archway along the quays, facilitate the 
loading and unloading operations. Travelling cranes, freight 
trains and lorries move along the broad thoroughfare beside 
the sheds, and joining this thoroughfare are the warehouses. 

Everything; in the harbour moves with clockwork precision. 
In these two free harbors alone, with their highly efficient 
and modern installations, more than 5,000 vessels with 
cargoes amounting to over five million tons, can be cleared 
each year. 

Altogether, Bremen harbors handle some 14,000 vessels from 
more than 50 countries. Cargo from 220 shipping lines fill more 
than 550 schedules per month, and shipping add up to more 
than 17 million tons per year. Almost l l A million of this 
travels to or from the U.S. 

Bremen is the home port for over 300 ships totalling 1.3 
million gross tons, or almost 30< of the total German mer- 
chant fleet. Largest of the 20 Bremen shipping companies are 
North German Lloyd and the DDG "Hansa." 

Downstream from Bremen city bridges, docks for oceaYi- 



going ships branch off from the river. They include, with 
the two harbors already mentioned, the grain harbour, tunlxi 
and factory harbors, coal and industrial harbors, potash harbor, 
and ore and oil terminals. Together they form a dock complex 
[inking a wide variety of activities and reflecting Bremen's 
world-wide connections as a shipping center. 

Each of Bremen's harbor basins has been specifically 
equipped to handle its particular cargo. Almost [50 miles of 
rail tracks in the port help transport trie cargo inland. Freight 
trains carry over 55'! and the rest goes by inland waterways 
and by road. 

A vast industrial complex has grown up around the harbor. 
Along with the important shipping industry are an aircraft 
plant, electronics and other manufacturing and processing 
plants. These turn out goods for export, or process imported 
raw materials. 

Corn mills, oil refineries and sawmills are part of this 
busy section. The Klockner-I lutte company adds blast furnaces 
and steel and rolling mills. Other important industries among 
many a wool dressing and carding firm, tobacco and coffee 
companies, breweries, chocolate factories, rope and cable 
manufacturers. 

The poet Rudolf Alexander Shroeder called this, his native 
city, the "ancient town beside the grey river," but Bremen 

Possesses something more than the heritage of nearly twelve 
undred years of history. It also has a lively feeling for the 
present. In the middle of the urban bustle stands the idyll of 
an old windmill on an ancient fortification, but out in the 
docky landscape, giant granary installations and mills dominate 
the scene. 

The Weser hills country surrounding the Bremische-Hafen 
is a charming region where all the characters of the Grimm 
Brothers' fairy tali's and the Baron Mimchhausan tales are at 
home. Sleeping Beauty's castle, Sababurg, still stands in the 
woods and the Baron's hunting lodge is now a pilgrimage 
place for romantic souls. Many picturesque little towns line 
the Weser River banks, among them the Pied Piper's Hamelin. 

Bremen is proud of the ancient Roland statue in front of its 
560-year-old Town Hall, yet decorates the Town Hall itself 
with a modern sculpture of "The Bremen Town Musicians." 
In addition to loving care for historical buildings, the people 
of Bremen have built spacious residential communities of bold 
modern design. 

For almost 200 years, the city of Bremen and the U.S. 



have shared economic ties. Bremen ships began calling it 

ports on the Eastern Scahoaid in 178). The founding ol 

Bremerhaven in 1827 gave traffic and trade relations a new 

impetus initiating passenger mail services to Europe. 

Bremerhaven was the last link with the Continent foi i 

majority of Europeans emigrants to America. A figure ol 
50,000 emigrants annually was not uncommon bv the middle 

ol the last century, while 365,000 departed from Bremerhaven 
by ship in 1913 alone. The Ocean Steam Navigation Company, 

a joint US-Bremen venture, inaugurated its scheduled mail 
service between the USA and Germany in 1847 with the 
arrival in Germany of its flagship "Washington" after a 17 (lav 
crossing. The voyage from New York to Bremer can now be 
made in seven days. 

The US sailing vessel "Draper" was the first ship to enter 
the North Sea harbor in 1830 and Americans weie the Inst 
to reopen commercial shipping traffic there after, both World 
Wars. 

With a decline of German nationalism since WWII the 
country has moved more firmly into the Western allian< e 
A new tolerance, or perhaps a revival of the humamtv ol 
Goethe's and Beethoven's time, has come about. European 
unity has become an outlet for the prodigious energy stimulated 
by German aspirations. 

West Germany, third largest industrial world power, in the 
very heart of Europe, is about the size of New York and 
Pennsylvania combined. Its 1963 population of 55,600,000 
was roughly one-third that of the U.S. while in the entire 
country there were 70 million people. 

Progress in the country during reconstruction following 
WWII was phenominal. Yet many things have remained 
unchanged for centuries. The basic beauty of Germany's 
glorious scenery, aft treasures, entertainment, such as stage 
plays, music gay folk festivals, and quaint ancient customs 
still attract the tourist. 

Good buys in Germany cover a wide range of articles. 
Some of these are leather goods, photographic articles, cameras. 
optical goods, china, ceramics, jewelry, wood carvings, cuckoo 
clocks, toys and watches. 

Today the flagships of both the US and Germain, the 
the "United States" and the "Bremen," sail the same route 
between New York and Bremerhaven as the first passenger 
sailing vessels did long ago. 




The Bremen Town 
Musicians — a 
sculpture by Ger- 
hardt Marcks on 
the west front of 
the Town Hal 




General view of Bremen's dockland 




Gilliam K. Horton, Chairman, Department of Conservation & Development; Roger P. Batchelor, Jr., Group Vice President, and 
Henry B. Clark, General Manager, Soda Products -Chrome Division, of Diamond Shamrock; Michael C. Brown, Chairman, and 
Hugh W. Branch, Wilmington Industrial Development Inc.; and James W. Davis, N. C. State Ports Authority. 

New Industry for Port of Wilmington 



The construction of a mnltimillion dollar chromium 
chemical plant near Castle Hayne was announced recently 
by officials of Diamond Shamrock Chemical Company 
of Cleveland, Ohio. 

The new plant will be located on a 150-acre site on 
the Northeast Cape Fear River near the Ideal Cement 
Co. plant. 

Henry B. Clark, general manager of the soda products 
and chrome division of Diamond Shamrock, said con- 
struction should get underway in January, 1970. The 
plant should be operational by late 1971. 

Clark said the Wilmington plant should employ around 
130 to 150 people with an annual payroll of "over one 
million dollars." 

Clark said the Wilmington area was chosen for the 
plant site with an eye on centralized service. Wilmington is 
in the center of many of Diamond Shamrock's customers. 
The river and port facilities here will also play a large 



part in the company's supply line with incoming chrome 
ore from South Africa being moved into Wilmington. 
The new industry was welcomed to Wilmington by 
Michael C. Brown, chairman of Wilmington Industrial 
Development, Inc. 

"On behalf of New Hanover County and Southeastern 
North Carolina, we welcome Diamond Shamrock's new 

f)lant," said Brown. "It is tangible evidence of their con- 
idence in our area and its people. 

"Choosing its location on the banks of our river 
indicates further the importance we must all continue to 
allocate to one of our most significant assets the Cape 
Fear River. 

"We would like to acknowledge with appreciation the 
assistance of the North Carolina State Ports Authority 
and other state agencies." 

The State Port Terminal was cited as a primary factor 
in Diamond Shamrock's decision to locate here. 



CP&L Plant Cooling Water To Be Emptied Into Ocean 



RALEIGH— Carolina Power & Light Company plans 
to discharge cooling water from its proposed Bruns- 
wick nuclear electric power plant into the ocean. 

Paul S. Colby, senior vice-president of CP&L, says 
the company has determined that the ocean discharge 
is advisable and desirable, and that required ap- 
provals for it will be sought from governmental 
authorities. 

Since plans for the Brunswick plant were an- 
nounced early last year, studies have been underway 
to determine whether the cooling water would be 
discharged into the Cape Fear River or the ocean. 

To get the water to the ocean will require five or 
six miles of canal, Colby pointed out. He said the 
water will be piped 2,000 feet off-shore and discharged 



beneath the surface. The anticipated discharge point 
will be about 1.5 miles west of Fort Caswell. 

Colby estimated that the canal and discharge fa- 
cilities will cost more than $10 million. When the 
second generating unit is completed in 1974 the Bruns- 
wick plant is expected to represent an investment of 
nearly $300 million. It will have generating capacity 
of more than 1,600,000 kilowatts. 

Colby also said that sand removed in constructing 
the canal and not required for the project will be made 
available for restoration of eroded beaches in the 
area. 

Through George Pickett, director of the State De- 
partment of Water and Air Resources, CP&L already 
has received a request from Mayor Clarence Murphy 
of Yaupon Beach for sand for that beach. 




DO'S and DON'TS 



DO read Customs Hints . Know your Customs rules. 

DO get Customs information from Customs officials. 

DO declare every article acquired abroad and accompanying 
you, including gifts. 

DO keep a record of all acquired items. Save sales invoices. 
Convert prices to U.S. currency to save time. 

DO pack your purchases and gifts in one piece of luggage. 

DO have all your baggage ready for inspection. 

DO know your State as well as Federal liquor restrictions. 

DO understand every country insists upon a thorough customs 
examination for returning residents. 

DO realize we want to help you clear Customs quickly. 

DO understand we appreciate your patience. Remember, 
Customs inspectors have a difficult task to fulfill. 



DON'T exceed your customs exemption without expecting to 
pay duty. 

I )ON'T forget your purchases sent home are subject to duty. 

DON'T be surprised if we open all your luggage. 

DON'T forget all accompanying foreign purchases must be 
declared, even those you have worn or used. 

DON'T accept the offer of a "false" sales invoice. This could 
result in seizures and penalties. 

DON'T rely on the "experienced" traveler, or foreign seller for 
your customs information. 

DON'T bring back lottery tickets. 

DON'T bring back fruits, plants, vegetables or meat without 
permits or advice from the Department of Agriculture. 

DON'T bring back gold coins, gold medals, or gold-coin jewelry 
without obtaining U.S. Treasury authorization. 



CUSTOMS 
INSPECTION 





I t 40Hii»i*- HMKTtl • • ■ "< 



BUREAU OF CUSTOMS / WASHINGTON, D. C. 20226 



English View of 
North Carolina Progress 

From an article in THE ECONOMIST, London, 1968 



If there is one state which looks like 
spurting forward from the back of the 
pack in the fiercely competitive race for 
industrial and economic expansion, that 
state is North Carolina. 

To be sure, it has still some way to go 
before it reaches even the middle of the 
field. It is only 42nd in the rough-and- 
ready scale of income a head; last year's 
figure of $1,913 is low indeed by Ameri- 
can standards. 

But as the chart shows North Caro- 
lina is growing faster than the country 
as a whole and its story is one of striking 
industrial expansion, improving skills and 
thus higher average earnings. 

American industry, recognizing a good 
thing, is putting money into North 
Carolina. Capital investment in the state 
rose last year to $399 million from $224 
million in 1959. Industry is increasing its 
stake in North Carolina because it offers 
an environment which is highly favour- 
able to the employer. 

Taxes are lower than they are in all 
but five states and the trade unions are 
weak. Companies which complain of 
vaulting tax demands and union pres- 
sures in the industrialized northern states 
naturally look southwards and North Caro- 
lina is just about as far South as most of 
them want to go in a period of racial 
upheaval . 

Moreover, the State maintains five 
community colleges, ten technical insti- 
tutes and twelve industrial education 
centers to lift the level of skills of its 
labor force. Big firms often reciprocate. 

For example, the Union Carbide Cor- 
poration, which has just built a new 
plant two and a half times the size of its 
old one at Greenville, pays half of the 



fees when one of its workers goes to 
night school and it pays college fees in 
full whenever a worker stays the course 
and obtains a degree. 

The celebrated Research Triangle was 
formed six years ago by the three 
universities — Duke, North Carolina State 
and the University of North Carolina— 
which are in or near Raleigh. It stands 
as a flourishing monument to govern- 
mental and industrial co-operation on a 
lovely site of over 5,000 acres approxi- 
mately equidistant from the three uni- 
versities and the facilities and talent they 
offer. 

Three successive Governors, starting 
with Mr. Hodges in 1954, have worked to 
attract new industry to the State. Yet 
for all the diversification and develop- 
ment now going on, North Carolina will 
clearly have to rely upon tobacco as its 
main product for a long time to come. 

About two-thirds of the country's 
supply comes from its fields and fac- 
tories. There was a fall in the con- 
sumption of cigarettes in 1964, after the 
publication of the surgeon general's re- 
port which linked cigarette smoking to 
cancer. 

But in the twelve months which 
ended last June more cigarettes were 
sold than ever before. With the popu- 
lation increasing new smokers of cig- 
arettes take the places of those who give 
them up. 

Nevertheless, realists concede that 
probably within a decade the consump- 
tion of cigarettes will decline and that 
further diversification may have to come. 

Physically North Carolina seems to 
have been designed by nature for di- 
versification. It stretches some 500 miles 



OHIO 






Income ahead . W _ 




i~fyvfeshinglo«vD.ct \)\ 




I20— //. — 

NORTH / ,'' \ _ 
CAROUNA^/^^ 


KEN. V 


W.VAy^ ^H 






\*-^ VIRGINIA \r 




\0O — / UNITED — 


TCNN-^ 
dp 






^vT-iT.-'-»« Raleigh <£^ 


*+* STATES - 

I957-59--100 /T 


G£ORG\A 


*"*S .NORTH JO 

\CARQUMA 

sooth \jr 

. CAROUMA J 

\ f O Mil«» 


ZOO 


80— rfr — 

i i i i i I i i i i I i i i I 






\950 55 .60 6* 



westwards from the Atlantic and has 
three distinct regions. 

On the eastern flank is a coastal area 
stretching for some 200 miles southwards 
through Kitty Hawk, where the Wright 
brothers made the first flight in a powered 
aeroplane, to Cape Fear. For about half 
of its length it is protected from the 
Atlantic storms and autumnal hurricanes 
by the Outer Banks. 

As a whole it offers everything one 
expects from a coastal territory in a 
temperate zone. Further west comes the 
central Piedmont region, the economic- 
heart of the State. And still further inland 
comes the magnificent mountainous re- 
gion of the Great Smokies and the Blue 
Ridge. 

It is in the Piedmont that the quicken- 
ing pace of development is being felt 
most acutely. It contains just over half 
of all North Carolinians and among them 
are a fifth of the country's total textile 
labour force, turning out a quarter of 
America's output of broad woven cotton 
goods and half of its hosiery. 

Half of the population of the whole of 
the United States lives within 500 miles 
of the center of North Carolina. There 
are not many richer markets than that 
anywhere in the world. 

One looks for the flaws in the jewel 
and they are there, of course. 

Insularity among the older people 
which degenerates at times into bigotry 
is taking a long time to die out. In racial 
matters North Carolina is by no means 
a pioneer but it is keeping abreast of the 
tide. 

Here and there a Negro is appearing 
on a local administrative board and there 
are other isolated signs of progress. 
Negroes form only 16 per cent of the 
state's total population, a low ratio for 
the South, and consequently there is not 
much racial tension. 

The present calm, unsatisfactory though 
it may be to those who want full equality 
between the races, seems likely to persist 
as long as the Negro continues to share 
the Stage's boom. 



-from THE ECONOMIST 



10 




JAPANESE 
BUILD SHIP 



AMERICAN 
FIRM BUILDS 
POWER UNIT 



The first of 7 New Supertankers, 212,000— ton s.t. 
Energy Transport has completed her sea trails off the 
coast of Japan and will be delivered this week 
to the owner. 

One of the largest of the new supertankers, the s.t. 
Energy Transport was built for Oriental Petroleum 
Carriers Inc., a member of the Island Navigation 
Corporation of the C. Y. Tung Group by Sasebo 
Industries Co. Ltd., Sasebo, Japan. The tanker is 



nearly 1100 feet long, with a molded breadth in 
excess of 158 feet. The vessel will be in service be- 
tween the Persian Gulf and Europe under time 
charter to shell. 

The s.t. Energy Transport is the world's first vessel 
equipped with the newly designed General Elec- 
tric M.S.T. 14 reheat marine propulsion plant with 
associated technical package. 




CTI-Container Transport International Inc. of New 
York City and Carl Tiedemann of Hamburg have 
reached an agreement by which Tiedemann in- 
stallations in 10 German cities will serve as CTI 



container depots. Photo shows Tiedemann's head- 
quarters in Hamburg. 

Heide represents CTI at Wilmington and More- 
head City. 



11 




DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



by 
(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilborv 
Staff Historiaji, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives avd History 



Old Beaufort- 



t* 



Colonial Fishing Villagi 



99 



There are no great iron pots in which to "tryout" the 
whale oil and no beckoning fires in the early spring 
darkness along the banks near Beaufort and there is 
no longer the high adventure of whaling along the 
North Carolina Coast. 

It doesn't matter, though, there are other high 
adventures in Carteret and April does not spell an 
end to the excitement, as it once did to the Northern 
whalers, who returned to New England. Most of the 
whalers did not linger to enjoy the softly filtered 
springtime with flowers nodding in a brisk wind that 
can become bitter at sundown. 

June inevitably follows April and Beaufort is really 
alive in June — antique show, house tour, and pirate 
invasion. 

Beaufort is an old town — its streets were surveyed in 
1713 by Richard Graves and named for Queen Anne; 
the Earl of Craven; William, Prince of Orange; Colonel 
Maurice Moore, and for Governor Pollock. It has 
survived war, fever, and depression and retains a 
charm that is magnetic. When the last bridge from 
Morehead City is crossed one is in Beaufort (pro- 
nounced "Bow -fort), incorporated in 1722. There are 
more than 100 houses and buildings that have weath- 
ered the winds and waves for at least a century. 
Many of the houses are occupied by descendants of 
the men who built them. They are largely "West 



Indies" in style with double porches. These same men 
built ships and manned them, wrestling a living from 
the ocean beyond the sandy banks. 

One of the men was Captain Otway Burns, privateer 
and owner of the "Snap Dragon," who helped the 
fledgling United States clear the Atlantic of British 
ships in the War of 1812. Burns' colorful career in- 
cluded privateering, shipbuilding, and lighthouse 
keeping, for the old seaman ended his career keeping 
the Portsmouth lighthouse. Today Burns' tomb in 
"the old Burying Ground" is surmounted with a cannon 
said to have been taken from his ship. 

The cemetery on Ann Street was deeded to the 
town of Beaufort in 1731 — burials had begun there 
earlier. Cypress slabs mark early graves, many of them 
of children. Visitors flock to the Old Burying Ground 
— there is a kindred spirit there that guides one along 
the paths and among the headstones. Plans are being 
made by the Beaufort Historical Association to restore 
the headstones that have been vandalized or that 
have been damaged by time and the weather. 

The Beaufort Historical Association is a living 
"little Red Hen" story. When the Joseph and Josiah 
Bell houses were purchased, restored, and opened 
to the public, local citizens sparked by energetic 
leadership did the job. The projects were assisted by 



12 



TOO GOOD TO MISS . . . 





For Your Convenience And Pleasure 

Reached by turning off U.S. 64-264 two miles west of 
the town of Manteo, a 600-car lighted and protected 
FREE parking lot is provided — only a few hundred feet 
from the entrance to the Waterside Theatre. A visit to 
the Park Service Visitor Center (museum) and The 
Lost Colony Gift Shop is a "must" for full enjoyment 
of the drama. Daytime Box Office located in The Lost 
Colony Building, next to the Elizabethan Garden. 

Wright Brothers Memorial (first flight site), the Cape 
Hatteras National Seashore (with museums at the Bodie 
Island and world famous Cape Hatteras lighthouses), and 
the beautiful Elizabethan Garden (also on the Fort 
Raleigh National Historic Site adjoining the Waterside 
Theatre) , are other outstanding attractions. 



Special perjormance of 16th century Masque by Lost 
Colony Company in the Elizabethan Garden on Saturday. 
July 26, 1969. 




\ table loaded with food .it the Joseph Bell House 



13 



r 



PAUL GREEN'S 




WU.!JL!^; 



Old Beaufort- 



64 



Colonial 



There are no great iron pots in which to "tryout" the 
whale oil and no beckoning fires in the early spring 
darkness along the banks near Beaufort and there is 
no longer the high adventure of whaling along the 
North Carolina Coast. 

It doesn't matter, though, there are other high 
adventures in Carteret and April does not spell an 
end to the excitement, as it once did to the Northern 
whalers, who returned to New England. Most of the 
whalers did not linger to enjoy the softly filtered 
springtime with flowers nodding in a brisk wind that 
can become bitter at sundown. 

June inevitably follows April and Beaufort is really 
alive in June — antique show, house tour, and pirate 
invasion. 

Beaufort is an old town — its streets were surveyed in 
1713 by Richard Graves and named for Queen Anne; 
the Earl of Craven; William, Prince of Orange; Colonel 
Maurice Moore, and for Governor Pollock. It has 
survived war, fever, and depression and retains a 
charm that is magnetic. When the last bridge from 
Morehead City is crossed one is in Beaufort (pro- 
nounced "Bow -fort), incorporated in 1722. There are 
more than 100 houses and buildings that have weath- 
ered the winds and waves for at least a century. 
Many of the houses are occupied by descendants of 
the men who built them. They are largely "West 



12 



ti«Jost(fcj 




Directed and Staged by 
JOE LAYTON 

For the 29th summer since 1935, 
The Lost Colony symphonic outdoor 
drama is being presented in the mag- 
nificent 2,000-seat Waterside Theatre 
on the shores of Roanoke sound on 
the Fort Raleigh National Historic 
Site, spiritual birthplace of America. 

Since 1964 the production has been 
in charge of dynamic young Joe Lay- 
ton, winner of television's EMMY and Broadway's TONY 
awards. He was choreographer of the original Broadway 
production of The Sound of Music, produced three 
Barbra Streisand TV spectaculars, staged the musical 
numbers of the Hollywood movie, Thoroughly Modern 
Millie, and directed and staged the Broadway hit, 
George M. 

Authored by Pulitzer Prize-winner Paul Green, The 
Lost Colony is produced by the Roanoke Island Historical 
Association, in cooperation with the State of North Caro- 
lina and the National Park Service. 

Presented by a company of 150 professional actors, 
dancers, singers and technicians ... in two acts and 11 
scenes. . . . the play surrounds you . . . drama so big it 
must be presented under the stars. 

Playwright Green's original words and music are vir- 
tually unchanged, but those who have not seen it in re- 
cent years will be astounded by the spectacular new 
scenery, costumes, lighting and staging. 




nave oeen uamageu uy urne 



ie weamer. 



The Beaufort Historical Association is a living 
"little Red Hen" story. When the Joseph and Josiah 
Bell houses were purchased, restored, and opened 
to the public, local citizens sparked by energetic 
leadership did the job. The projects were assisted by 



'A 



J>-l« " 




ft 



History You Can See and Feel 

Story of the first English settlement in America, on the 
very spot where Sir Walter Raleigh's 1587 colony landed, 
lived and finally vanished into the great unknown . . . 
more than 20 years before Jamestown and 30 years before 
Plymouth Rock . . . featuring the birth of Virginia Dare, 
first child of English parents born in the 16th century 
New World. 

Pageantry of Queen Elizabeth's court . . . sorrow and 
heartbreak of starvation and death on a lonely shore . . . 
excitement of Indian dances and attacks . . . the suspense 
and romance lightened by rollicking humor and gay 
songs. 

Family entertainment . . . school age children thrill 
to seeing history unfold before their eyes . . . adults never 
cease to speculate on what happened to these courageous 
people ... all ages love antics of Old Tom and his faith- 
ful squaw, Agona. 





For Your Convenience And Pleasure 

Reached by turning off U.S. 64-264 two miles west of 
the town of Manteo, a 600-car lighted and protected 
FREE parking lot is provided — only a few hundred feet 
from the entrance to the Waterside Theatre. A visit to 
the Park Service Visitor Center (museum) and The 
Lost Colony Gift Shop is a "must" for full enjoyment 
of the drama. Daytime Box Office located in The Lost 
Colony Building, next to the Elizabethan Garden. 

Wright Brothers Memorial (first flight site), the Cape 
Hatteras National Seashore (with museums at the Bodie 
Island and world famous Cape Hatteras lighthouses), and 
the beautiful Elizabethan Garden (also on the Fort 
Raleigh National Historic Site adjoining the Waterside 
Theatre) , are other outstanding attractions. 



Special performance of 16th century Masque by Lost 
Colony Company in the Elizabethan Garden on Saturday, 
July 26, 1969. 




Joseph Boll House, living room 



A table loaded with food .it the Joseph Bell House 



13 



ADVANCE RESERVATIONS RECOMMENDED 



STORY OF FIRST ENGLISH SETTLEMENT IN AMERICA 



Buy tickets in advance to insure best seats and avoid 
standing in line at box office. Reserved seats on sale at 
most motels and hotels. Phone 473-2971 or 473-2658 in 
Manteo for reservations or mail Ticket Form to THE 
LOST COLONY. Box 68, Manteo, N. C. 27954. 

SEATING ARRANGEMENT & TICKETS 




All Reserved seats (regardless of age) $3.50 

General admission (12 years and over) $2.50 

General admission (6 tol2 years) $1.00 

Children under 6 years admitted free 
Special rates quoted upon request for Tour, School, 
Church, Scout, Military and other such organized groups. 



(Number) 



Day 



tickets to The Lost Colony for the 
_ performance. 



Date 



Enclosed is check (or money order) for $ 

Allow ample time for mailing of tickets. If it is too late 
to mail tickets to you we will hold them at the Theatre 
Box Office. Refunds cannot be made unless tickets are re- 
turned and reservations cancelled prior to performance date. 
General Admission tickets may be purchased at the Theatre 
Box Office only. 



Photos by Aycock Brown 



ciicuiii ii mi 13 imi 



gncn 



rnicii uic Ki.ii unuj'w iiwin 



Morehead City is crossed one is in Beaufort (pro- 
nounced "Bow-fort), incorporated in 1722. There are 
more than 100 houses and buildings that have weath- 
ered the winds and waves for at least a century. 
Many of the houses are occupied by descendants of 
the men who built them. They are largely "West 



12 




Name 


TICKET ORDER FORM 


Add rpa<1 


City 


Stfltp 



J^NORFOLK 



Biiobrth \ . Kitty Howk 
City ^^KillDwilHilli I 
NagiHaad I 

MANTEO 







Easy to Reach 



Roanoke Island, Manteo, the Waterside Theatre ai 
The Lost Colony may now be reached over good TOL1 
FREE highways. Only 75 minutes from U.S. 17 (Ocei 
Hiway), one hour and 45 minutes from Norfolk, Va. ai 
the Hampton Roads area, and less than four hours fro 
Raleigh or from Interstate 95 and U.S. 301. New TOL 
FREE bridges now connect the North Carolina mainlan 
with Kitty Hawk, Kill Devil Hills, Nags Head, and Mantel 
and with fabulous Hatteras Island. 

Tourist Accommodations 

The finest hotels, motels, cottages, restaurants and otl 
tourist accommodations are available in Manteo and 
the Dare Beaches (only minutes from the Watersi 
Theatre). For information write the Dare County Tour 
Bureau, Manteo, N. C. and/or the Nags Head Chamber 
Commerce, Nags Head, N. C. 

DESIGNED AND LITHOGRAPHED IN U.S.A. Br THE BAUGHMAN CO., RICHMOND. VA. 



iiwve ueen uamagcu uy imie anu me wcauier. 

The Beaufort Historical Association is a living 
"little Red Hen" story. When the Joseph and Josiah 
Bell houses were purchased, restored, and opened 
to the public, local citizens sparked by energetic 
leadership did the job. The projects were assisted by 



the Department of Archives and History and grants 
from the Richardson Foundation, but most of the 
planning and backbreaking work has been Beaufort- 
inspired. 

Though many Beaufort enthusiasts are native, some 
of the most ardent restoration workers are "furriners," 
but only in the sense of being born away from Carteret. 
Beaufort is not an imitation Cape Cod seaport — 
Beaufort is an original — it has a personality of its own! 

The names found on tombstones are also on store- 
fronts, filling stations, and other enterprises and the 
people who greet you along the streets are not ghosts 
conjured out of the past. Beaufort people love their 
heritage and cheerfully share it. 

During the last weekend in June paintbrushes, 
gardening tools, and everyday pursuits are abandoned 
for colonial costumes. Many houses (most of them 
private) are opened and guided tours are available. 
Even the children participate and the men (not look- 



ing too out of place) in ruffled shirts defend their 
homes against Spanish pirates who re-invade the 
town, as they did in 1747. The Spanish flag is one of 
four which has flown over Beaufort. 

For those who like to walk leisurely along the 
streets there is a walking tour map just as there is a 
brochure to point out the various plots and headstones 
in the cemetery. Houses are marked with the Beaufort 
"shield" and are named and dated. 

The Duke Marine Laboratory is located on Fivers 
Island as is the U. S. Government Fishery — famous 
scientists visit there. Artists find pleasant subjects on 
land and water. Lovers of seafood are offered a 
tantalizing variety. There is a magnetic pull to the 
fishing village. 

Beaufort has something for every visitor — fishing, 
sailing, an old jail museum, a whaling museum, 
historic houses — you'll find it just after you cross the 
last bridge from Morehead. 





Caleb Bell House, 1770 



Duncan House, 1790 





Joseph Bell House, living room 



A table loaded with food at the [oseph Bell House 



13 



MOREHEAD CITY PIONEER FORWARDERS 



W. 0. Smith & Co. Inc. 



ESTABLISHED 1865 



703 

1865 -Years 
Now 



1968 



EXPORT 

INTERNATIONAL FORWARDING AGENTS 

IMPORT 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. Baltimore, md. 21202 



P. O. Box 23 
PArk 6-5300 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 

412 Gravier Bldg. 
JAckson 5-8164 



33 S. Gay Street 
SAratoga 7-6936 

NORFOLK, VA. 

147 Granby St. 
Suit 523-527 
Phone: 625-4512 



New York 4, N. Y. 

35 South William Street 
WHitehall 4-9120 

F.M.C. License No. 481 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Sieamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

0. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobile Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



LITH0 INDUSTRIES, 
INCORPORATED 

PRINTING 

PUBLICATIONS 

CASE BOOK MANUFACTURING 

Serving North Carolina For 
All Her Printing Needs 



P. O. Box 12462 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Telephone (919)782-1314 
782-1315 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 
RICHARD BARKER, General Manager 
Vice-President, Luckenbach Steamship Co., Inc. 
E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 
A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 
W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 
P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 
P.O. Box 232. Tel: (919) 726-5080 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



l 4 




Pick a spot. Anywhere on 
the globe. 

We're there. Helping you 

do business 

abroad. 

Handling foreign exchange. 
Locating foreign suppliers. 
Issuing commercial letters of 
credit. Writing letters of 
introduction. Or whatever your 
needs may be. 

We make it our business to make 

your business a little 

easier. 

After all, that makes your 
business easier, too. 



FIRST UNION NATIONAL BANK 
INTERNATIONAL DEPARTMENT 

(704) 372-3456 

Post Office Box 10794 

Charlotte, North Carolina 28201 

MEMBER FOIC 



PUNT QUARANTINE OPENS 
OFFICE AT MOREHEAD CITY 




Roberts 

The United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural 
Research Service, Plant Quarantine Division, has felt for many 
months that fast sustained growth of the port of Morehead 
City, represented the completion of the new phosphate bulk 
loading facility, would justify establishment of a permanent 
office. Until February 24, 1969, Plant Quarantine coverage of 
Morehead City was accomplished from Wilmington. In order 
to live up to the unofficial title of "First line of defense for 
American Agriculture", this division must keep up with the 
increased volume of international transportation and Morehead 
City is obviously a part of this expansion. 

The latter part of February proved to be excellent timing for 
a permanent Plant Quarantine office opening because the day 
the office opened was the dav the maritime strike ended. This 
was followed by a steady flow of vessel arrivals, many dis- 
charging cargoes of Plant Quarantine interest. 
An example of "Quarantine interest" cargo recently discharged 
here is the Brazilian lumber, destined to furniture mills in 
North Carolina. Inspection revealed an infestation of a termite, 
Nasutitermes sp., not present in the United States. Measures 
were immediately taken to prevent the dissemination of this 
pest. 

Italian made automobiles, 84 to be exact, were discharged to 
be driven overland to the consignee in Boston, Massachusetts. 
Inspection of this type cargo is necessary to insure that the 
undercarriages are free of foreign soil, a notorious carrier of 
plant pests such as nematodes. Foreign soil is prohibited 
entry into the United States by the Federal Plant Pest Act. 
The inspector assigned to these duties, and the many others 
too numerous to mention, is Mr. Larry C. Roberts. Mr. 
Roberts is an Iowa transplant and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. Larry started his career at the port of New 
Orleans Louisiana, and comes to Morehead City after serving 
this port as part of the Wilmington staff for three years. 
The Plant Quarantine Office is now housed in the State 
Ports Terminal office. This office will be responsible for activi- 
ties at Cherry Point Marine Air Station and Elizabeth City 
Coast Guard Air Station, in addition to the port. 

NEW OFFICE OPENS 

Wilmington Shipping Company of Wilmington, 
North Carolina, announces the opening of an office in 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, for foreign freight forwarding 
services. 

The office is under the management of James P. 
Schley, who has been associated with Wilmington 
Shipping Company for a number of years. It is located 
on the property of the Greater Baton Rouge Ports 
Authority in Port Allen, Louisiana, with its mailing 
address Post Office Box 528, Port Allen, Telephone 
504-343-9545. 

Wilmington Shipping Company, in addition to its 
headquarters in Wilmington, has offices in Charlotte 
and in Morehead City. In Morehead City, company 
operations are carried on under the name of Morehead 
City Shipping Company. 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Freight Sale9 Mgr. 

WADE H. PIERCE 

Manager — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 

JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr.— Import Dept. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. No. 469 



STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 Cable Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. 0. BO* 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 




BARBER 



LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York— 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1814 First Federal Bldg. 



Agent: Moreheod City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



INDUSTRY 

AT ITS BEST! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools. 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 



V" 



1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 
N. C- Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 




WITH 
ET . . . 




. . . along the south atiantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Moreheod City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Finer PA 6-5440 

Operators 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



17 



EXPORTUNITIES 



INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Uept. of Commerce 

P. 0. Box 1950. Boom 40S 



Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C 

(919) 275-9111 



-MISCELLANEOUS AGRICULTURE 

Switzerland— Seedlings without roots of following 
plants: dracaena sanderiana, dracaena deremensis 
warneckei, philodendron florida eompacta, hova 
exotica. 

FLOOR COVERING MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Spain — Carpets, rugs of all kinds; first class qualities. 
LOGGING CAMPS, LOGGING CONTRACTORS 

Korea — Douglas, hemlock fir logs, common lumber, top 
diameter 6" up, length 18' up, estimated annual 
requirement 200,000 MBF., purchase term 36 months 
credit upward, with L/C issued bv local bank. 

PAPER MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Netherlands — Woodfree and ground-wood printing, 

writing paper; following qualities of kraftliner: sack 

kraft; semi-chemical fluting. 

Sweden — Special printing paper for optical clearing 

recognition (OCR ). 

CONVERTED PAPER, PAPERBOARD PRODUCTS 

Spain— Wallpaper. 

SYNTHETIC MATERIALS 

Netherlands — Transparent cellulose film for laminating. 

CHEMICAL PRODUCTS 

Korea — Sizes for textile industry. 

Sweden— Special printing ink for optical clearing 

recognition (OCR). 

TIRES, TUBES 

Austria — Tires for passenger cars, trucks. 

CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, GENERAL HARDWARE 

Netherlands— Rope fittings, clamps, shackles, fasteners, 
other hardware for camping; hand spades, other hand 
tools for camping; hunting knives. 



METALWORKING MACHINERY 

Sweden — Pneumatic tools for automobile maintenance. 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Sweden— Printing machinery for production of con- 
tinuous, other manifold forms. 

GENERAL INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY 

Netherlands— Pumps for chemical, petrochemical, phar- 
maceutical, soft drink, food processing industries. 

SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES 

France — Laundrv, dry cleaning, pressing equipment, 
industrial and commercial, up-to-date machines, such 
•as ironers, washers, extractors, wringers, driers, tum- 
blers, steam-processes (tailor-type, others ), related 
lines . 

ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION, DISTRIBUTION 
EQUIPMENT 

Germany — Oscilloscopes, digital counters, HF-instru- 
ment, equipment, multi-channel recorders, power 
amplifiers, other electronic measuring instruments. 

ELECTRICAL MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, SUP- 
PLIES 

Israel — Compact electrical units, sizes: 20, 250, 600 
and 1,000 kva; 3 Voltage 380 v; frequency 50 cps; 
shaft speed 3,000 rpm. 

SHIP BUILDING, REPAIRING 

Uruguay— One new or used ferryboat, roll on/roll-off 
type, 500/700 passengers, TO/100 automobiles; mini- 
mum speed 12 miles per hour with two diesel engines 
of approximately 1400 hp. each, two radars, one radio 
station; spare parts, accessories. 

INSTRUMENTS, FOR MEASURING, CONTROL- 
LING, INDICATING PHYSICAL CHARACTERIS- 
TICS 

Netherlands — Parking meters, (also coin-operated), 
other automatic parking lot, parking structure equip- 
ment. 

SURGICAL, MEDICAL, DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 

Netherlands — Surgical and medical instruments, ap- 
paratus; reusable and disposable instruments. 



COMMERCE NOTES (C0NT. ) 

UNIQUE MARKETING TOOL-TRADE CONTACT SURVEY 
— The U. S. Department of Commerce offers a service to 
reduce guesswork and provide a systematic approach to find- 
ing an agent, distributor or licensee to service your overseas 
markets. Once your firm initiates a Trade Contact Survey, and 
after the feasibility of the survey has been determined by 
specialists in the Commerce Department, your application 
and supporting materials are dispatched to the appropriate 
Foreign Service post. Within 90 days the Survey report is 
returned complete with names and addresses of suitable 
foreign trading partners, evaluations of local businesses in- 
terested in the proposal, and data on market and trade 
regulations. If you feel that a Trade Contact Survey might 
possibly enhance your interest or involvement in exporting, 
contact the Greensboro Field Office. The staff of the local 
office of the Department of Commerce is available to help 
you with this and other Commerce services. 

18 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE'S AGENCY INDEX PRO- 
MOTES U. S. EXPORTS— North Carolina exporters are urged 
to take advantage of the Commerce Department's Agency 
Index Service which is designed to put prospective foreign 
buyers in speedy touch with local sources of supply for U. S. 
products. All you need to do is list the names and addresses of 
your overseas agents, distributors or licensees with U. S. 
Foreign Service Posts by completing Agency Index cards 
(Form FC-30), supply of which is available from. the Greens- 
boro Field Office. All U. S. manufacturers and exporters with 
representation overseas are urged to send in their agency 
information promptly and to keep it current by submitting 
replacement cards wherever changes occur or new arrange- 
ments are made. With this information the U. S. commercial 
attaches can be of greater help in promoting the sale of U. S. 
products in foreign markets. 



Avoid foreign 
entanglements. 



Expanding your 
operations abroad? 
Interested in overseas 
trade? Then count on 
having to unravel some 
complicated negotiations 
and market regulations. 
And plenty of paperwork. 
But take 
courage. 




We can help you cut 
the red tape. 

Wachovia has on-the-spot 
contacts in over 100 
countries. And world 
banking specialists in 
affiliate banks in London, 
Paris and New York. We 
have the facilities and the 
personnel to handle any 
international banking 
situation. Including 
financing. 

So before you get caught 
at loose ends, contact 
Wachovia. Now. 

International Dept. 

\^ichovia 

Bank & Trust, N.A. 



Winston-Salem. N. C. 27102 • Phone: 761-5000 

Member F.D.I.C. 

Cable: WACHOVIA TELEX: 806426 

Ans. Back: WACH INTL WSL 




STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




W. H. Frirderichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet ot 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneously. Additional 
1,045 ft. of wharf in 1969. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported bv tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506,000 
square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up by 15 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 522,962 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 273,000 square feet, 

open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
equipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal property. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
conveniently located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour dutv. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius ) can be used in tandem with either of 
the 45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions. 



20 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ships tackle and open top railcars 
possible by prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Brokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 





Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two ol steel, concrete and mason rv, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single- depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight ear storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 

T clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes 
Tractors and trailers. 
m 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths (j and 7 have two 75 

ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. (Janes m.i\ he used in 
tandem with 1.50 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port of eutrv 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY; 3,000,000-ton annual capacit) 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacitv of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacitv 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OB UNLOADING: Truck and rail cine ks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cvanide and acritet fumigation facilities. Two °>.0OO 
cubic foot steel chambers, lull mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern \ & EC Bail- 
wav System and the Beaufort \loiehead Railroad 
plus numerous highwav motoi carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITFS AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on dutv at all tunes 










«r 







In RALEIGH, CHARLOTTE and other fine North Carolina Communities ■ CAPITAL AND SURPLUS: OVER $30,000,000 



■ Member F. D. I. C. ■ © First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company 1965 



n, 



BEAUFORT-MOREHEAD RAILROAD 

Serves Radio Island 

and the Deepwater Port, Nearest to the 

Open Sea 
IN MID-AMERICA 



Look at this Photo . 




Beaufort Harbor at Morehead City 
Radio Island 



Land Lease Arrangements 
Tank and Liquid 

Import-Export Terminal Leases 
Construction for all types of Liquid 

Ocean Shipping, Planning and 

Financing Available 
Located within 500 miles of 50% 

of the population of the United States 



Write or Call 

A. T. LEARY JR. 

16 Broad Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

Telephone: (919) 728-2131 



WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents and Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr.. Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 WACHOVIA BUILDING 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 28401 



TELEPHONE 
(919) 763-5186 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




MoseAeaJ City 

Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 

■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P. W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 






P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 









F M.C. No. 498 






The H 


ipage Company 


, Inc 










CUSTOMS BROKERS 










FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 




Citizens 
Norfolk 


P 

Bant 
Vi 


0. Box 

Bldg. 

ginia 


Douglas Municipal Airport 
27143 — Tel. Area Code 704—392-3171 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 

Richmond, 
Travelers 


Va. 
Bldg. 


Newport 
P. 0. 


News, Va. 
Box 123 




Alexandria 
P. 0. Box 


Va. 
550 


Membe 


r Notionol Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 








of America, Inc. 







W. B. ATKINSON 
Freight Sales Mgr. 



A. C. SMITH 
Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 

F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



24 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and serving it well! 



The 10,200-mile Southern Railway System 
connects Morehead City with major population 
centers in the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern innovations in equipment and 
service are designed to meet specific shipper 
needs with a dependable, one-management 



transportation network that can save you time, 
money and trouble. 

On your next import or export shipment, 
ship Southern— and see! Contact 
the men in our Sales Office at 
New Bern, N. C, P.O. Box 909, 
or telephone (919) ME 7-6877. 





N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



IUU KATE 


U 5 Po.ioo. 


PAID 


•otonh. N C 


P..«.l No 31 



When we handle cargo, 

we always try to give it 

this kind of tender, loving care. 




HEIDE COMPANY 
Founded 1869 
(A Division of Luckenbach 
Steamship Co.) 




mm 



WILMINGTON & MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 

Steamship Agents • International Freight 

Forwarders • Stevedores 



1W5/5 




Avoid foreign 
entanglements. 



Expanding your 
operations abroad? 
Interested in overseas 
trade? Then count on 
having to unravel some 
complicated negotiations 
and market regulations. 
And plenty of paperwork. 
But take 
courage. 





<& 







'© 



We can help you cut 
the red tape. 

Wachovia has on-the-spot 
contacts in over 100 
countries. And world 
banking specialists in 
affiliate banks in London, 
Paris and New York. We 
have the facilities and the 
personnel to handle any 
international banking 
situation. Including 
financing. 

So before you get caught 
at loose ends, contact 
Wachovia. Now. 

International Dept. 

\^ichovia 

Bank & Trust, N.A. 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 • Phone: 761-5000 

Member F.D.I.C. 

Cable: WACHOVIA TELEX: 806426 

Ans. Back: WACH INTL WSL 




-O 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 16 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 23 

Carteret County 24 

Carteret Towing Co., Inc IB 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler 14 

First Union National Bank 15 

Heide Company 14 

Heide Company Luckenbach Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co 24 

Litho Industries, Inc 14 

Maersk Line 14 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Inc 16 

New Hanover County 16 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. National Bank 19 

Ryan Stevedoring Co 1 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 17 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Inc 16 

Wilmington Shipping Ci 17 

Woodbury Insurance Agency 24 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolmo Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN 

StAtl HfAOOUAITIiS. ttUCKING lUUOtMC. lAUICH 



r 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Ports of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 



A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 





March 6, 1969 



ros Associates 
<nstilting Engineers 
5 Lexington Avenue " — 
New York, N. Y. 10022 a!*- '_■ 

Gentlemen: 







fpsc^is 




The Judges of the Engineering Excellence Competition have awarded y 
Vtorehead City Bulk Terminal, SecondjiBJge^in Civil Engineering. .T-he~ Jury 

*orr ^pfc *tL fc^* C^===2 ^r^" 

Frederic A. Davidson, Jr., Commissioner,. Dept. of Public Works 
John M. Kyle, Chief Engineer, Port of New YorkTtTrrTw^c^T^ - 
Gordon Wallace, Dir. of Design Div., Naval Facilities \ 

Hunter Hughes, Editorial Director, Consulting Engineer 
Stephen A. Kliment, Editor, Architectural and Engineering News 
May we be the first to commend the excellence of your entry. The presentation of 
the Award will be made at the Dinner -Dance on March 26th at the Starlight Roof of 
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. Your panel will be on exhibition preceding the Dinner. 




WEnnwt 



Sincerely, 

William Eipel, Chairman 
Engineering Excellence 
Awards Committee 







IGL CALLS WILMINGTON 

The Independent Gulf Line has extended its South At- 
lantic Service to provide regular sailings between Wilming- 
ton, North Carolina and ports in the United Kingdom 
and Continent range. The first vessel calling at Wilmington 
will be the Dutch flag M/V "HILVERSUM" on July 30. 
Thereafter calls will be scheduled at twenty-one day 
intervals at Wilmington and other South Atlantic ports. 



The Independent Gulf Line managed by Vinke & Com- 
pany, Amsterdam has served the U. S. Gulf and South 
Atlantic trade for twenty-two years. Amerind Shipping 
Corporation of New York are general agents for the service. 

This step to expand the frequency and scope of the 
IGL South Atlantic Service is in further recognition of 
the increasing transportation requirements of the growing 
Southeast, according to Lewis C; Paine, Jr., President of 
Amerind. 



AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

E. N. RICHARDS, Raleigh, Chairman 
K IKK WOOD ADAMS, Roanoke Rapids 
L. R. BOWERS, Whiteville 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville, V. Chm. 
LAMAR GUDGER, Asheville 
WILLIAM PHAKK, McAdenville 
GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

F. II. ROSS, JK., Charlotte, Secretary 
H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 




OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



STATE PORTS 



?* 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 

RUFF A. DeVANE, Treasurer, 

Comptroller, Ass't. Secretary 

E. LEE, JK., Director of Commerce 6 Exec. Ass't 
S. S. KOSZEWSKI, Representative 
KAY MATTHIS, Representative 

II. C. JACKSON, Director of Traffic 
HUGH HAKDAWAY, Director of Engineering 



SUMMER ISSUE, 1909, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 15. NO. 2 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 



Governor Scott & Boat Storv 4 

Maid of Cotton .5 

Le Havre 6 

History land Trail 70 

Exportunities 7S 

Port Information 20 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State 1'ort Terminal 

Drvv. 648-28557 

Telephone 726-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt. Hulk Facility 



In this issue we present for the eighth time a continuing feature called 
"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is being written 
for us hi/ Mrs. Casey of Greenville, North Carolina. Mrs. Casey has -.pi at 

many years traveling, particularly in the orient and th<- south sins. The 
eighth feature is on Le Havre, France. (See Pages 6 and 7). 



Photo credits should be given to: Seco, N. C. Dept. of Archives and History. 
J. T. Howard Agency. 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

Stata Port Terminal 

P. O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. II. Friederichs, Operations Manager 



COVER: 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT, Manager 

Telephone 919-457-2621 

P. O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 
WALLACE CLARK. Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code 212) 269-1843 




SOUTH PORT HARBOR 

The cover tins tunc is a picture ol 
North Carolina's boat harboi at South 
port. Visible in the left centei are the 
new covered slips, financed by the Gen 
eral Assembly of 1967. These covered 

slips will make this boat harboi one ol 

the most modern on the waterway, Its 

reputation and convenience has . ihr.uk 

gained lame up and down tin eastern 

seaboard. 



RALEIGH OFFICE 
PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149—27602 

Raleigh, N. C. 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public Relations also 

Administrative Ass't to Ports Authority 



For information about: 

THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS write- or call L. C. 
Bruce, Editor c\ Publisher— State Ports Magazine, P. O. Box 
149, Raleigh— Published Quarterly. 919 829-3855 




Last month Gov. Scott signed North Carolina's Safe Boating Week Proclamation and discussed boating safety with these boating 
enthusiasts and Safety Week Chairman. Pictured are (left to right) H. A. Schmidt, Manager, Southport Small Craft Harbor; 
Charles H. Kimbrell, New Bern boat dealer; Dr. Dan A. McLaurin, Sect. 27, N. C.'s U. S. Power Squadron; Cmdr. Glasgow, 
U. S. Coast Guard, Elizabeth City; Fred. M. McCutchen, Cmdr. U. S. C. G. Auxiliary Flotilla 91 (Raleigh); William T. Casey, 
Cmdr. Dis. 27, N. C.'s U. S. Power Squadron; John R. Parker, Wildlife Commission; and Howard Braxton, Red Cross Representa- 
tive, Elizabeth City. 



S. S. EXMINSTER A 




N.C Poi-i 
Activities 



In 1968 Room 3 of the Hendersonville Junior 
High School 6th grade taught by Mrs. Louvenia 
P. Martin adopted a merchant ship the SS. Ex- 
minster of the American Export Isbrantsen Line 
on a plan promoted by the Propeller Club of 
the U. S. From then on things began to happen; 
the first mate wrote, they followed the ship in 



Queen Visits Tokyo 




Last May the Maid of Cotton — Miss Cathryn Mini- 
head visited Hudson-Belk's huge downtown stoic in 
Raleigh and was introduced to the media. The next 
day she was the guest of the Forts Authority on a tour 
of the General Assembly building and met many of the 
solons as they say in the newspapers. 

She told us about her upcoming visit to Japan and 
we asked her to send us a picture from Tokyo— Here 
it is— The Maid of Cotton USA on the steps of the 
tropical gardens in Tokyo — Special for the State Ports 
Magazine— 



GNED TO ROOM 3 









the news, She visited Wilmington, thev re- 
ceived letters from many ports, she weathered 
an Atlantic storm, finally was sold to Spain for 
scrap. 

The Public Relation Division of the State 
Ports Authority received an 84 page scrap hook 
excerpts of which are shown here. 




L6 H71RV6 D6 GRTlCe 



SINC6 1517 



'Roaming the Seven Sens with Belli/ Casey' 



Is "Le Havre de Grace" still the "harbor of grace and 
shelter?" 

Founded in 1517 by Francis I, where the Seine river 
empties into the English Channel, this now bustling harbor 
was the first French port built according to modern con- 
cepts. The port's deep-water, sheltered approaches are 
situated on Europe's northwest shore along the present 
route of the densest sea-going activity of the entire world. 

Nearly 300,000 enthusiastic passengers, aboard such 
great luxury liners as the SS United States, the SS America, 
and the Le Havre home-based French liners "France," 
"Flandre," and "Antilles," along with many other ships 
from around the globe, in 1965 put the harbor in second 
place to Southampton in European transatlantic sea-going 
traffic. 

Many were hastening to the country extolled in song 
and poetry as the land of romance, in additional pursuit 
of perfumes, elegant "haute couture," snails, art culture, 
historical enlightenment or to enjoy rich folklore of songs, 
poems and dances of the provinces. 

Rebuilding of the port, after 95% of it was destroyed 
during WWII, and addition of up-to-date equipment 
operated around the clock, has resulted also in annual 
fast handling of freight cargo amounting to well over 21 
million tons. This first and last stopping point for Southern 
traffic along the English Channel has accommodated over 
11,000 vessels in one year — including in 1967 the mam- 
moth 200,000 ton Norwegian tanker, Bergehas, the first 
ship of more than 100,000 tons to enter a European conti- 
nental port. 



Handling of this and other increasingly gigantic vessels 
was made possible by excavation of approach points in- 
creasing the depth of the outer harbor channel and the 
tidal basin to almost 38 feet. Plans are set for further deep- 
ening the harbor to over 45 feet. Rock free fossile valleys 
discovered in surveys of the submarine depths of the 
Seine led to hopes for future dredging to a depth of almost 
53 feet. 

Further traffic across the 43 miles of English channel 
between England and France will be made possible by a 
rail tunnel — with 22 miles of it underseas. Each train will 
carry 300 cars and will travel at 87 mph. Peak capacity is 
expected to be 400 vehicles per hour. 

France, next largest of European countries to Russia, 
approaching 50 million population, and with 212,659 
square miles of varied and rich topography — from moun- 
tains to seashore — is a traditionally sea-faring country. 

Many French ports, some of which date back to ancient 
times, lie along its almost 2000 miles of coast. Marseille, 
the first port and now the largest, was founded in 600 
B.C. by the Phoenicians and developed by the Romans for 
military purposes. After discovery of the New World, 
ocean-going traffic became mainly commercial. By the 
end of the 18th century, all of France's great present day 
ports were in existence. Ships composing today's modern 
French merchant marine have an average age of nine 
years. 

The country began its history as a separate nation by 
decree of the 843 tieaty of Verdun which divided France, 
Germany and Italy among Charlemagne's grandsons. 
French terrain is varied and rich. The country is bordered 

The maritime railroad station at Le Havre No. 6 dock is lined up alongside the dock to ti-ansport passengers and freight to Paris and other points. 



vmmj 



5&«*5 






-ui 



s» 












55^. 



«s**«si 



■ Mar l 




■•■ **?% 



<2*C^>- 




on the north by the English Channel, the North Sea, 
Belgium, Luxembourg ana West Germany; on the <;ist 

by West Germany, Switzerland, and Italy; on the south 
by Monaco, the Mediterranean Sea, Spain and Andorra, 
and on the west by the Bay of Biscay and the Atlantic 
Ocean. 

Described as "four river basins and a plateau," except 
for the plain of Flanders in the north, the nation is nor- 
mally almost self sufficient in basic foodstuffs and leads the 
world in wine products. Three of the streams flow west — 
the Seine to the English Channel, the Loire into the 
Atlantic, and the Garonne into the Bay of Biscay. The 
Rhone flows south into the Mediterranean. 

The French people — from cosmopolitan to provincial 
types — are a mixture of Mediterranean, Latin, Celtic, and 
Germanic stock, with a tiny Semitic minority. More than 
85% of the people are native born and most of these are 
Roman Catholic. 

Education is free and compulsory lor children aged 6 
to 16. Of 20 Universities, the University of Paris, founded 
in 1150, is the oldest and largest. Military service of 10 
months is compulsory with total forces numbering 560,000. 
Paris, the French capitol, a great seething metropolis, is 
historically, socially and economically the country's heart- 
land. 

Today, France is a strong member of the Common 
Market, and a vocal world power. Its strength has been its 
great peasant base and Foreign policy has been its Achilles 
heel. Now, poor housing and wage grievances of the work- 
ing class, and labor unrest caused by price increases, pose 
problems for the newly elected president of the Fifth 
Republic, Georges Pompidou. 

France ranks high in the production of iron, steel, alumi- 
num, textiles, aircraft, automobiles, petroleum, chemicals 
and electrical equipment. Agricultural products include 
cereals, sugar, beets, flax, root crops and wine. R has 
the largest annual fish catch in Europe. Minerals are 
principally iron ore, coal, antimony, bauxite and mag- 
nesium. 




Liquid methane gas port of Le Havre 

Before WWI, Le Havre was a major trading center for 
such products as coffee, wool, and cotton. Today, oil 
accounts for over 87% of the incoming cargo. 

The Jules Verne was the first giant tanker built in 
France for transporting liquefied gas. Each year it carries 
14 billion eu. ft. from Algiers to Le Havre — roughly 
400,000 tons of fuel. 

Exports include chemicals, machinery and spare parts, 
perfumes, textiles, ears and loose sugars. Among the im- 
ports are undressed timber, cotton, fruit, and oil seeds. 

Behind over five miles of piers at Le Havre are more 
than 25 miles of quays equipped with 200 cranes and 
12 floating cranes, one of which is a 250-tonner. Ware- 
houses on its 90 hectares of land area cover a surface of 
over 515,000 square meters offering cold storage, oil reser- 
voirs and grain silos. 




The « Jules VERNE » is the first bi(? tanker for transporting liquefied 
natural gas to be built in France. Each year it carries 14 billion cu. 
ft. of gas from Algiers to Le Havre, which corresponds to roughly 
400.000 tons of fuel. 

Ships are maintained and repaired in seven dr\ docks, 
the largest measuring 315 meters by 38 meters, able to 
accommodate ships of the largest tonnages. A maritime 
railroad station parallels No. 6 dock to facilitate trans- 
portation of freight and passengers to Pans and other 
points. 

Traffic is made independent ol the log In an efficient 
radar network. Within an hour of arrival in the roads, 
either by day or night, six days a week, vessels come along- 
side to load or unload, even during low tide or springs. 
On Sunday, only liner and perishable cargo operations 
are assured. Le Havre is known as a port with a last 
turn-around. Its annual traffic is expected to total over 
30 million tons in the near future, 

Strong ties bind French and American affairs and 
attitudes — seemingly irrevocably. These stem from the be- 
loved Statue of Liberty, designed by Frenchman Bartholdi 
and presented to the U. s. by the Franco-American Union 

to commemorate the centennial ol American Independ- 
ence, to the memory ol over one-and-a-half million Ameri- 
can lives lost on French soil during World Wars 1 and II — 
as well as the ribbons of essential passenger, freight anil 
political traffic linking the two countries across the At- 
lantic like cabled belt lines ol steel. 

Le Havre port, the "harbor ol grace ami shelter," no 

longer exudes the aura of tranquility which instigated its 
naming. Inroads made by modern demands have turned 
it into an efficient treadmill of productivity. Yet vessels 
putting in at Le Havre harbor are still sheltered from the 

raging elements of the North Atlantic. 



15 Years for Mamie. . . 




In the beginning;. 15 vears ago. the chief finance 
officer of the Ports Authority had two persons in his 
office: one, a steno-clerk. and the other an accounting 
clerk. The accounting clerk was Mrs. Mamie X. Bryan. 
At that time the capital inyestment of the Authority- 
amounted to $7,500,000. employees totaled about 40. 
two or three ships called at the docks per month, 
financial records were kept by hand in pen and ink. 
All that was missing was the elastic arm bands, green 
eye shades and high-top desks, although these two 
girls would have been attractive with those. In those 
early days, the press of work was not great and there 
was a laughing agreement that the girls worked in 
the morning and manicured their nails in the after- 
noon. 

On June 30. 1969. Mrs. Bryan retired after more than 
15 years employment with the Ports Authority. Dur- 
ing that time the Ports Authority grew swiftly with 
capital inyestment of approximately S40.000.000 and 



an ayerage of 90 or more yessels calling per month. 
Employment had increased to 400. Mrs. Bryan, with 
her strong capabilities, had risen to the position of 
Assistant Comptroller for the Ports Authority and 
was responsible for the supervision of 13 people. 
From the days of the hand-kept ledgers, she saw the 
force of progress move the Authority's financial record 
keeping from hand-kept records to simple accounting 
machines to sophisticated electronic accounting ma- 
chines with data processing abilities. Xo time was left 
for manicures. 

"The moving finger writes and haying writ moves 
on." Mrs. Bryan will be greatly missed by her immedi- 
ate associates in the Comptroller's office and by many 
others in the maritime activity of Xorth Carolina's 
ports. To her we wish a long and happy retirement. 
Editor's note: Her boss wrote this however the other 
3 offices of the Ports Authority join in the fond fare- 
wells with equal affection 



STEVE RETIRED 




finest military units in any school in the country u i 
were the finest mound when it came to marching but tins 
was not Captain Koszewski's main objective Hi could 
foresee the coming oj World War II and he wanted his 
cadets trained in the art oj combat. Il< set this lii be his 
primary task. Like et erything else he has et ei done he 

did it well, and a feu years later "kosr.ru ski Trained 
Cadets" entered the armij and. l/ei ause they urn mil 
trained, heeame eomhat leaders on all fronts. Today most 
of US feel that we OU e our Hi es to a man named Koszeu ski 

— for it uas his training that brought us through combat. 
Captain Koszewski is mm knou n to us as Colonel 
Koszewski. On June I 'J. 1969, 30 years alter he left 
Benedictine, Colonel Koszewski teas the honored gUi tt 
at our annual Alumni Dame. At this affair, Colonel Kos- 
zewski was awarded the Benedictine Medal o\ Honor /<" 
his outstanding contribution to the school and a plaque 

from his cadets of IW15-IVIU for his leadership and inspira- 
tion. 

In his honor, the "Stephen S. Koszewski Award of 
Honor" was established. 'This award it ill be presented 
annually to an outstanding alumnus for loyalty, service 
and devotion to Benedictine Military School, and Colonel 
Koszewski will he permanently identified in the affairs and 
history of the school. 

He is loved, honored and admired Inj so many oj us. 
that you might say that Savannah's favorite "citizen" lives 
in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

"Captain Kelly", we love you! 




Alderman Joseph Myatt Presenting th 
Colonel Stephen S. Koszewski 



John B. Hohenstein, Jr. 

President 

HOHENSTEIN SHIPPING COMPANY 

Savannah. Georgia 



On September 1st Stephen Koszewski will retire from 
the serviee of the North Carolina Ports Authority after 
14.5 years. 

We thought it might go well to honor "Steve" on the 
eve of his retirement by presenting these flashbacks into 
his personal career before he became a hardworking, ever 
present, salesman for the North Carolina State Forts. 

Here is what a former student and friend had to say 
about him on a special occasion this past June: 

In September 1936 my parents were thoughtful enough 
to enroll me in Benedictine Military School. There it was 
my good fortune to find the Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics (the Commandant ) to be one Captain Stephen 
S. Koszewski, U. S. Army. 

Captain Koszewski was a proud man — proud to be an 
American — proud to be serving his country — proud to have 
the opportunity to mould the characters, careers and lives 
of young men in the R.O.T.C. Program. 

His pride was contagious — we all caught it. In a very 
short time he moulded his Cadet Battalion into one of the 




Father Aelred Beck, Headmastei of Benedictine Ifilitarj School Pre- 
senting Benedictine Medal of II. .nor to Colonel Stephen g 



- VKL'llL ' • : ' 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 





(Mrs.) Elizabeth W. Wilborv 
Staff Historian, Division of 
Historic Sites, State Department 
of Archives and History 



Murfreesboro 

King's 

Landing 



"The Columns," 
Chowan College, 
Murfreesboro 



There is absolutely nothing in Murfreesboro to re- 
mind one of the magnolias and moonlight associated 
with the novelist's version of a sleepy southern river- 
port, graced by old houses with shapy piazzas on 
which lovely southern belles recline in hammocks. 
Nothing, that is, except the magnolias, the river, the 
houses, the shady porches, and of course, the southern 
belle (who most likely is a co-ed at Chowan College ). 

The historic town of Murfreesboro, settled in the 
1700's, was named for William Murfree, who gave the 
land on which the town was built. Once much of the 
Hertford County area was inhabited by the Meherrin, 
Nottaway, and Chowanoke Indians. Today only scat- 
tered artifacts remain to indicate their townsites. The 

10 



Murfrees and other settlers helped establish a brisk 
trade at Murfree's Landing, where the presence of 
an inspector for the Crown made the port a "king's 
landing." During the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 
turies sailing vessels brought goods from New Eng- 
land, the West Indies, and Europe. When they left 
port they were burdened with the plentiful naval 
stores, for which North Carolina became famous, and 
local agricultural products. 

Some of the New Englanders boarded their vessels 
and settled their families in Murfreesboro and neigh- 
boring towns. Their "hallmarks" are to be found in 
the houses they built, for many combine "Yankee" 
and southern architectural features. Fourteen of the 



houses are standing in the historic district of Mur- 
freesboro. Some of the houses are rapidly deteriorat- 
ing; others sparkle with fresh paint. 

There are six restorations in progress currently; one 
of them is under the direction of the Murfreesboro 
Historical Association, Inc. and the Historic Murfrees- 
boro Commission. Most of the preservation effort is 
private but the entire area is involved in the William 
Rea Store project. Built in 1790, the store is thought 
to be one of the oldest commercial buildings in the 
state. Utilizing locally made brick, laid in Flemish 
bond, the Rea Store is located in the designated, and 
zoned twelve-block historic district. The store was 
given to the Association, which plans an adaptive use 
for the structure. 

One of the most famous citizens of Hertford County 
was Dr. Richard J. Gatling, inventor of the Catling 
gun. Richard Jordan was one of several Catlings who 
exhibited a remarkable talent for inventing. James 
Henry Gatling invented a wonderful flying machine 
(which actually flew ) at least twenty-five years before 
the Wright brothers made their historic flight in 1903. 
The Gatlings were born and lived near the Village of 
Como. Another noted American, Dr. Walter Reed, 
who conquered yellow fever, lived for a time in Mur- 
freesboro and married a local girl. 

There are at least seventy -five historic properties in 
the Murfreesboro area; a number of them are for sale 
at reasonable prices. An ad in the April, 1969, Preser- 
vation News read: 

. . . Reasonably priced 18th and 19th 
century brick and frame properties avail- 



able for restoration in 18th century river- 
port. Outstanding restoration program 
now in progress. . . . 
Already there has been response to this and other 

advertisements. There are many reasons why this 

eastern Carolina town is appealing — Chowan College 
is one of them. Founded in 18-18 this two-\ear co- 
educational school has one of the most beautiful cam- 
puses in the south. One outstanding feature is the 
graphic arts program, with courses in the mechanical 
production of newspapers and commercial printing. 
Linotype, Teletvpesetter, offset, and letterpress meth- 
ods are taught with related courses in design and 
layout. 

College-connected citizens have joined in the el- 
fort to preserve the early atmosphere ol Murfreesboro. 
The plan for preservation includes adaptive uses of 
restored buildings. The enthusiasm of the home- 
owners reached its zenith in April when Historic Mur- 
freesboro Week was observed. Five private homes 
were opened and the local garden club sponsored 
a flower show. 

Guitarist Bunyan Webb, then the musician in resi- 
dence at North Carolina State University, and his 
wife Susan, who plays the horpsichord, were featured 
on the fine arts program. Teas, tours, speeches, and 
banquets made a memorable week for visitors. 

In case the urge to preserve or restore is overwhelm- 
ing, inquiries may be addressed to the Murfreesboro 
Historical Association, Inc., Murfreesboro, North 
Carolina 27855. 



The William Rea Store, historic district, Murfreesboro 





Artist's view after restoration 



Photograph before restoration 



11 




North Carolina Goes Sellin 



ROBERT W. SCOTT 

Governor of North Carolina 



It is a profound pleasure for me as Governor to in- 
troduce to you the members of the North Carolina 
Agribusiness Trade Mission to Australia and the Far 
East. Trade missions have become a part of our 
State's development since 1959, and currently North 
Carolina ranks 10th in the United States in annual 
volume of exports. 

These distinguished businessmen come to describe 
their products and to investigate business transac- 
tions that should prove profitable to both of you 
Similarly, our State has been the scene of rapid in- 
dustrial growth during the past few years with many 
foreign companies establishing successful operations 
in North Carolina. Therefore, the Mission members 
will be pleased to discuss with you the many ad- 
vantages of investing in North Carolina. 

I extend to you my personal best wishes. 




OS* 

Sis? 









**/ 







Mr. Ronald E. McCowen Mr. E. E. Lee, Jr. 



Mr. Robert E. Leak Mr. F. D. Frissell, jr. Mr. James A. Graham 







Mr. Adrian L. Shuford, Jr. Mr. Eugene E. Carroll, Jr. Mr. A. J. Haynes Mr. Hugh G. Chatham, II Mr. Albert Adams 




r~\ 



.W'l 



tfii 




Mr. A. B. Brannock Mr. F. B. Fishburne, Sr. Mr. L. R. Clark Mr. Robert E. Pomeranz 



12 



. 




-'. 



mm 

mm 



1 




People keep bumping into North America. 



On their way somewhere else. Like Asia. 

And for a long time people looked 
for a short cut: a Northwest Passage to the Orient 
that would provide a direct route between Europe 
and Asia. 

But no luck. Till now. 

Experts are predicting that soon the 
Northwest Passage will no longer be just a dream. 
With the advent of sophisticated forms of contain- 
enzation, it may soon be economically feasible to 
ship goods in Asian-European trade directly across 
the United States. 

Which is good news for the North 
Carolina ports of Wilmington and Morehead City. 
These ports are closer by land to most of the Pacific 



Coast than many other deepwater ports on the 
Atlantic. 

And these ports are ideally suited 
to exploit the land bridge concept. Modern dock- 
side facilities. Excellent rail connections. Low 
pilferage and breakage. Fast turnaround. Plenty 
of storage space. 

In the meantime, remember: Wil- 
mington and Morehead City are closer to most 
midwestern markets than other eastern ports. 

When you're ready to open the North- 
west Passage, we're ready, too. 

North Carolina Ports 



d The Orient And Down Under 



*** 



^ 



*j- 



The North Carolina Department of Conserva- 
tion & Development, working through its Export 
Coordinator, Mr. Ron MeCowen, has organized 
an Agri-Business Mission to Australia and the 
Far East. The coordination of this trip has been 
spectacular and proves onee again that with 
cooperating agencies such as the N. C. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, the U. S. Department of 
Commerce, the Regional Export Expansion 
Council and the Ports Authority that North Caro- 
linians can do most anything. 

The reception in Japan will he most cordial 
and they expeet to be able to see and talk to 
some of the high level Japanese industrialists 
who came to this country earlier in the spring. 
At that time the Japanese received a cordial 
invitation to visit North Carolina, and also re- 
ceived gifts from Governor Scott and the North 
Carolina State Ports Authority. 



'V, 



'0/7, 



'">,, 



"•I, 



'9e d 



>' 



%&?$«*' * 



Jr n e 



th. 



U T'°n 



* T ^1&'&&2E*+- 



*H 



>ey 



On dr 



'On, 



■<>u 



y °n, 



r ne 



'° K, 



oi Pei 



■n r 



'>-/• 



V,, 



Vo 



'or, 

th 



^Ot 



°k)Z ° n d t l G en e Z y , °e 



^X*j>f 



' u 9u st 



epte, 
n 









24 

1-3 



2? 




MELBOURNE 



Hatteras Yacht Begins 

Construction of Second 

Plant at New Bern, N. C. 

PITTSBURGH, Pa., August 4, 1969— Hatteras Yacht Divi- 
sion ol North American Rockwell Corporation (NR) has begun 
construction of a second major plant at Hatteras' 95-acre 
manufacturing site at New Bern, N. C, Joseph W. Selden, 
president of NR's Industrial & Marine Divisions, announced 
today. 

The new plant will provide approximately 90,000 square ft. 
of additional space for production of large yachts and com- 
mercial vessels in the Hatteras line, Selden said. 

"This new Plant will contain the most modern production 
equipment and layout anywhere in the world for the manu- 
facture of large fiberglass vessels," the NR executive said. 

"Completion of the new facility in early 1970 will double 
Hatteras' production capacity," Selden explained. "The new 
plant will be used for manufacture of fiberglass vessels of 50 
ft. and over in length." 

The first New Bern plant, which began operation earlier 
this year, is used for construction of 53 and 58 ft. yachts and 
the new Hatteras 74 ft. fiberglass fishing trawler. 

The Hatteras trawler, first production fiberglass vessel in 
the history of the U. S. fishing industry, "is expected to help 
rejuvenate the U. S. fishing fleet by improving its competitive 
position in the world's fishing market," Selden said. 

Hatteras' plant at the division's headquarters in High Point, 
N. C. will continue to operate at full capacity in the manu- 
facture of fiberglass yachts 31 to 50 feet long, Selden added. 

The 29th largest industrial corporation in the United States, 
North American Rockwell is engaged in 19 related engineering 
and manufacturing businesses. It has major strengths in 
research and development, aerospace and commercial products, 
systems engineering and a growing position in a number of 
the emerging industries. 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Sfeamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Box 232 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Broad Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

0. E. DuRANT 



SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 



Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobile Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



LITH0 INDUSTRIES, 
INCORPORATED 

PRINTING 

PUBLICATIONS 

CASE BOOK MANUFACTURING 

Serving North Carolina For 
All Her Printing Needs 



P. O. Box 12462 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Telephone (919)782-1314 
782-1315 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C. 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 
RICHARD BARKER, General Manager 
Vice-President, Luckenbach Steamship Co., Inc. 
E. MAYO HOLMES, Secretary-Treasurer 
A. P. BLAND, Manager, Operations Department 
W. M. TEACHEY, Manager, Traffic Department 
P. C. WEST, Manager, Export Department 
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 
P.O. Box 232. Tel: (919) 726-5080 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



11 



Memoef F D I C 
ARIU 

servk3 

QA.NK 



Is Fir st Union National 
impressed by the growth of 
NorthCaroGna's state ports? 
\bu can bankon it. 



In our new 
Wilmington offices. 



££3 



■ Or 



First Union National & 




BARBER 



LINE 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 



Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 

NEW FAST VESSELS 

• 

BARBER STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

GENERAL AGENTS 

New York— 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1814 First Federal Bldg. 



Agent: Morehead City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



WS3 W1TH 

CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Finer & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 




INDUSTRY 




AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Bird. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



L6 



W. B. ATKINSON 
Freight Sales Mgr. 

WADE H. PIERCE 
Manaiffr — Import Dept. 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 

JESSE C. JACOBS 
Asst. Mgr. — Import Depl. 



Wilmington 
Shipping Company 



tfiUfr^f 



am 



F.M.C. No. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 (able Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 28208 Morehead City, N. C. 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



N. C. TRAVEL COUNCIL REPORT 




PITTMAN L. FISHER JR. of Fairmont has re- 
cently been employed by the North Carolina State 
Ports Authority as assistant comptroller. 

He was formerly employed by Douglas & Associ- 
ates, CPA, of Lumberton, and succeeds Mrs. Mamie 
N. Bryan who retired June 30 after 15 years of 
SPA service. 

Fisher is married to the former Charlene Ritchey 
of Lexington, Ky. They are parents of a daughter. 



In April the Travel Council of North Carolina. Inc.. which 
is a private group not associated with state government except 
in a cooperative way and whose principal purpose is to pro- 
mote travel and trade in North Carolina, sent L. C. Bruce. 
Public Relations Director for the State Ports Authority, on a 
speaking tour in Kentucky. 

Bruce showed slides of the seacoast, the port terminals and 
other interesting places to visit in North Carolina. Overflow 
crowds were present in Frankfort, Kentucky and Louisville, 
Kentucky on successive days. The Louisville Luncheon was 
attended by some five hundred members of the Rotary Club 
and their guests. Most of the slides were furnished bv Hugh 
Morton, world famed photographer and a member of the Travel 
Council. 

Bruce reported that post -meeting comment brought forth 
many visitors and business connections with North Carolina 
background, particularly in Louisville. He has. therefore, 
recommended that the Travel Council sponsor a tour of the 
Ohio Valley in the Spring of 1970. It will be .i similar tour to 
the one sponsored bv the Travel Council to Florida in 1967. 
at which time Florida rose from fifth to third in the number 
of visitors furnished North Carolina during the regular season. 

The above photo shows a public sen ice billlxurd in Fort 
Lauderdale, Fla. which is the result of the cooperation of the 
Travel Council of North Carolina and the outdoor advertising 
industry, specifically. The Lamar Dean Company, ol which 
James Griffin of Raleigh is a Vice-President. The printing 
costs of these billboards are bonie bv the Travel Council. 
The display costs are borne bv the outdoor advertising in- 
dustry. 



r 



EXPORTUNITIES 



INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

I . S. Dt'pt. ol Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950. Boom 408 



I'ost Office Bld«. 
Greensboro, N. (' 

(919) 275-9111 



FRUIT, TREE, NUT, VEGETABLE FARMS 

Barbados — Citrus pulp. 

LIVESTOCK FARMS 

Barbados — Turkey parts. 

MEAT PRODUCTS 

Singapore— USD A Grade A turkeys, eight to 18 lbs. each 
at two lb. intervals; USDA Grade B turkeys, eight to 18 
lbs. each at two lb. intervals; chicken wings, three joints, 
packed in five pound printed cartons; chicken drumsticks 
packed in five pound printed cartons; chicken thighs 
packed in five pound printed cartons; chicken "drumettes" 
packed in five pound printed cartons. 

CANNING, PRESERVING FOODS 

Spain — All classes of canned foods. 

BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON 

Germany — One hundred per cent undved, unbleached 
cotton fabric remnants, one to ten yards, such as poplin, 
sheeting, contour blocks for production of polishing discs, 
wheels. 

YARN, THREAD MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Germany — Yams of all types for weaving, knitting mills, 
hosiery manufacturers; monofilament nylon sewing thread. 

TEXTILE GOODS 

Spain — Textile wastes, rugs. 

MEN'S, YOUTHS', BOYS' FURNISHINGS, WORK 
CLOTHING 

Malawi — All types of shirts, jeans, slacks, sport jackets; 
inexpensive grades. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 

Austria — Fertilizer of all kinds. 

CUTLERY, HAND TOOLS, GENERAL HARDWARE 

Sweden — Builders' hardware, such as door handles, knobs, 
hinges, other related items. 

METALWORKING MACHINERY 

Korea — Automobile maintenance equipment; auto-lite, ga- 
rage jacks, tire gauges, timing light tester, plug tester, 
lathes, car washer, boring machine, auto greasers, valve 
refacers, offset wrenches, adjustable wrenches, gear pullers, 
hydraulic press, air compressor, engine scope. 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Germany — Textile machinery, looms, Jacquard loom at- 
tachments, dobby cards, electronic yarn cleaners, other 
newly developed textile machinery. 

SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES 

Germany — Coin-operated laundry machines, in particular 
driers. 

SURGICAL, MEDICAL, DENTAL INSTRUMENTS 

Malawi — Medical, surgical testing papers for urine, blood, 
etc. 

TOYS, AMUSEMENT, SPORTING GOODS 

Germany — Fishing tackle, equipment, all types of fishing 
rods, fishing reels, fish hooks, casting plugs, spinners, and 
spoons; flies, lures and similar artificial baits. 
Israel — All ranges of athletic, gymnastic equipment (spe- 
cifically trampolines and balancers ) for stadiums, sport 
halls, schools. 

GRAIN MILL PRODUCTS 

Malawi — Wholegrain wheat flour for baking in packs of 
100, 140 lb. 



PLASTIC PRODUCTS 

France — Pre-packaging and packaging materials for utiliza- 
tion in supermarkets for fruits, other food products, such 
as extensible polyethylene PVC film, transparent plastic 
in rolls and sheets of various sizes and gauges; roll drum- 
liners, spools and up-to-date snap-off systems designed 
for prompt, easy dispensing. 

FABRICATED STRUCTURAL METAL PRODUCTS 

Honduras — Tubular steel poles, steel towers. 

INSTRUMENTS FOR MEASURING, CONTROLLING, 
INDICATING PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS 

Canada — Dynamometers, fatigue testing machines, geiger 
counters, humidity instruments, laboratory scales. 

1969 Export Control Regulations Now Available — The 

1969 "Department of Commerce Export Control Regula- 
tions", effective June 1, 1969, are now available from the 
Greensboro Field Office at a price of $12.00. 
These regulations replace the former Comprehensive Ex- 
port Schedule and this new publication has been simplified 
and reorganized. 

These regulations will be supplemented by "Export Con- 
trol Bulletins" which were previously titled "Current Ex- 
port Bulletins". 

No regulatory changes in export control procedures are 
listed in the 1969 regulations, but the Blanket License 
Procedure has been eliminated. 

AU Canada's Kennedy Round Tariff Reductions Now Ef- 
fective^ — Under provisions of Canadian budget presented 
to Parliament June 3, all of Canada's Kennedy Round 
Tariff reductions scheduled to be implemented in three 
(3) remaining stages up to January 1, 1972 have become 
immediately effective. This means that duties shown in 
Canadian Tariff Schedule as due to take effect January 
1, 1972 are now fully in effect. The only exception is 
Tariff Item 19201-1- Shoeboard. This acceleration of 
Canadian concessions is intended to increase competition 
in the Canadian economy, to reduce factory and con- 
sumer costs and to combat inflation. 

INTERNATIONAL MARKETING INFORMATION 
SERVICE 

Country Market Surveys — Each of these detailed and 
penetrating studies provide an evaluation of the nature 
and scope of the market for U. S. products in an indi- 
vidual country. Included are an outline of the country's 
industrial establishment, banking and finance structure 
and natural resource development, and descriptions of 
present import patterns, distribution facilities and trade 
practices. The market for selected commodities is ana- 
lyzed. 

Exhibitors Export Market Guide — Background data to 
sales throughout the world, by country and by product. 
Prepared in advance of trade center shows, trade fairs, 
and exhibitions to assist U. S. businessmen planning to 
participate. Provide description of markets, sales op- 
portunities, demand for items on sale, international 
competition, sales approach and sales and technical re- 
quirements. 

World Markets for U. S. Exports — A service that re- 
views specific products/country marketing opportuni- 
ties other than those involved in commercial exhibitions. 
These reports are the only available tool by which a 
business executive can compare his own export per- 
formance to any specific market over a six-year period 
with that of his Own industry as a whole or with that 
of manufacturers of the same product in other coun- 
tries. Country reports 75c; commodity reports 10c. 



Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




W. H. Fricderichs. Operations Manager 



DRV CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneouslv. Additional 
1,045 ft. of wharf in 1969. 

TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported bv tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fullv-sprinklered. modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506,000 
square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up by 15 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible bv rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 522,962 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
by arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 273,000 square feet, 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
equipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
bv truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal property. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
conveniently located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius ) can be used in tandem with either of 
the 45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-tvpe cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top railcars 
possible bv prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easv access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Brokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Booting Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 



20 





Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 
clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes ma> be used in 
tandem with 1.50 ton capacitv. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port ol entr) 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 
bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacity of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OR UNLOADINC: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and Fastest vacuum 
cvanide and acritet fumigation facilities. Two W.tHX) 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern A c\ EC Rail- 
way System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on dutv at all times. 






^^ • '.'•'*' ' 


• 






H^""" 38 








.-•" 38 


33 . 


• •. 


^^ 


38 .. 




3 


38 


•.•• : _ : \s 


-**— 


-«- 


29 


<s#? 


# 





Across the Pamlico River from its phosphate mining and processing complex, Texas Gulf Sulphur Com- 
pany is developing a 600-acre horse farm as part of its land management program. 

Texas Gulf plans to raise fine horses for show and sale. If the farm operates economically, it ivill demon- 
strate the suitability of Eastern North Carolina to raising thoroughbred horses. 

The horse farm, Pamlico Farms North, presently has 41 horses, although land continues to be de- 
veloped and barns constructed. 



I 



Pamlico Farms North 



// 



Pamlico Farms North, located just west of Bath, is 
lit of Texas Gulf Sulphur Company's land manage- 
ent program in North Carolina. The farm will demon- 
rate Eastern North Carolina's suitability for raising 
ie horses. The brood mare stable, with 20 stalls and 
dividual pasture for a mare and colt, is pictured. 




Located on property west of the historic town of Bath, the 
farm property was formerly owned by the Beasley and Archbell 
families. The farm land has been drained, a two-acre pond 
formed, a 44-acre swamp area raised 14 feet to a suitable 
elevation, and graded acres of brown earth are being turned 
into green pastures with sowing of coastal bermuda and centi- 
pede grasses. 

Farm manager Walter Vaughn, a native of Lubbock, Texas, 
says the stock will be grazing year round on either coastal 
bermuda or green wheat and oats. Vaughn has been a Texas 
Gulf employee for 20 years, coming to North Carolina from the 
TGS plant at Worland, Wyoming. 

Vaughn recently moved out of the Archbell house, a three- 
story frame house dating from the early 18th century, into a 
new residence on the farm. 

Under Vaughn's direction the scenic farm is becoming a top 
quality breeding ground for fine horses. The present herd of 
41 includes four stallions, 20 brood mares (14 Thoroughbred 
and six German Hanoverians), and 14 yearlings and coming 
two-year olds. Six will be up for sale this year. 

By June, 1970, the herd is expected to reach its maximum of 
100 head. About 20 colts will be sold each year after next 
summer. 

The picturesque farm is criss-crossed with standard Chestnut 
and five-feet high Locust split-rail fencing. The brood mare 
stable has 20 stalls with each mare and colt having an in- 
dividual pasture. An old stallion barn, replaced by a new one, 
is being used as a hospital. 

Other structures include a 20-stall yearling barn, Vaughn's 
new home, an office, feed storage barn and hay drier. Inter- 
spersed among the pastures and buildings are wooded areas 



11 






■ ..... ' ■ , ... ■ 



which eventually will have a 20-foot clearance between trees 
and be seeded with lawn grasses for beautification. 

Vaughn's interest has turned the farm into a haven for wild- 
life as well as horses. Last winter, tons of feed were put out 
for deer, geese, duck and quail. Vaughn estimates there are 
at least 30 convey of quail on the farm. 

An attack on the mosquito population is being implemented 
with the erection of houses for 800 Martins and a water gut 
being formed so the water level can be raised and lowered to 
kill larvae. 

In developing Pamlico Farms North as part of TGS's land 
management program, Vaughn has worked closely with the 
local game protector of the State Wildlife Resources Com- 
mission and with officials of the Federal Soil Conservation 
Service in Washington. 

Improvement of the land for a horse farm began about two 
years ago. It is an outgrowth of TGS's beef cattle and forestry 
programs which began over five years ago on the south side 
of the river, near the mine and production complex. 

Vaughn's counterpart across the river is Hayes Gregory, 
formerly a faculty member at N. C. State University. Gregory 
manages the cattle and forestry programs at Pamlico Farms 
South, and hopes to eventually have a herd of 4,000 Black 
Angus beef cattle. 

Gregory's programs have been on land waiting to be mined. 
He is moving this year onto land already mined to restore it 
to productivity. 

Efficient use of land and profitable raising of horses and 
cattle are integral parts of Texas Gulfs program as a corporate 
citizen of North Carolina. The successful raising of stock will 
testify to the effectiveness of Texas Gulf's air and water pollu- 
tion control devices used in the' production of phosphate. 



BEAUFORT-MOREHEAD RAILROAD 

Serves Radio Island 

and the Deepwater Port, Nearest to the 

Open Sea 
IN MID-AMERICA 



Look at this Photo 




Beaufort Harbor at Morehead City 
Radio Island 



Land Lease Arrangements 
Tank and Liquid 

Import-Export Terminal Leases 
Construction for all types of Liquid 

Ocean Shipping, Planning and 

Financing Available 
Located within 500 miles of 50% 

of the population of the United States 



Write or Call 

A. T. LEARY JR. 

16 Broad Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

Telephone: (919) 728-2131 



23 



WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents and Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr., Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 WACHOVIA BUILDING 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 28401 



TELEPHONE 
(919) 763-5186 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




More/iaaJ Qty 



Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 

■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P. W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 



F M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 

P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704 — 392-3171 

Charlotte, N. C. 28208 

Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



W. B. ATKINSON 

Freight Sales Mgr. 



A. C. SMITH 

Manager 



L. M. WALLACE 
Export Traffic Mgr. 



PAUL JENKINS 
Office Manager 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



F.M.C. 469 

STEAMSHIP AND FORWARDING AGENTS 
STEVEDORES— CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

300 Arendell Street 

Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



24 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and serving it well! 



The 10,200-mile Southern Railway System 
connects Morehead City with major population 
centers in the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern innovations in equipment and 
service are designed to meet specific shipper 
needs with a dependable, one-management 



transportation network that can save you time, 
money and trouble. 

On your next import or export shipment, 
ship Southern— and see! Contact 
the men in our Sales Office at 
New Bern, N. C, P.O. Box 909, 
or telephone (919) ME 7-6877. 




X - 'H 



t:i 



i 



BED 6EB 



■HB^S 







CZD 



INNOVATIONS THAT SQUEEZE THE WASTE OUT OF DISTRIBUTION / SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



WASHINGTON. D 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



we were 



IUIK RATI 
U S Poiiae* 

PAID 

BoL.gK N C 

P«raA No 33 



here 9 years before 

anyone 

whistled "Dixie" 



nVVf^r CUm ^ssiq, 



27602 



Dan D. Emmett composed "Dixie" in 
1859. Our company was founded in 

1850 

And we've been making friends in the 
maritime business ever since. 
Today, Luckenbach serves the shipping 
industry through a network of marine 
terminals, stevedoring companies, and 
agencies throughout the south. 

Luckenbach 




Steamship Company, Inc. 
120 Wall Street 
New York, N. Y. 10004 
Luckenbach Philadelphia * Heide Company Wilmington, Morehead City; North Carolina 
Caldwell Company Jacksonville • Shaw Company Cape Canaveral, Port Everglades, Miami, West Palm Beach * luckenbach Tampa 



fNbrth Carofina State Litxar^ 
Raleigh 

n. a 



MW <J*« - ■• 



jffil A 



' 4* '(# 



•• "I* 



tfMMWM 



■ 



4terL 






N** 



M- ** 







t*&** 




Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmericard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmericard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 



• • • • • 



• • • • • 



• • • • 




INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines 16 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 23 

Carteret County 24 

Carteret Towing Co., Ine 16 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler 14 

First-Citizens 22 

First Union National Bank 15 

Heide Company 14 

Luckenbaeh Steamship Co., Ine Back Cover 

Hi-Page Co 24 

Litho Industries, Ine 14 

Maersk Line 14 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead City Line Handling Co., Ine 16 

New Hanover County 16 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. National Bank Inside Front Cover 

Ryan Stevedoring Co 1 

Southeastern Shippers 14 

Southern Railway Inside Back Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co 19 

Walker Taylor Insurance 17 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Ine 16 

Wilmington Shipping Co 17 

Woodbury Insurance Agnecy 24 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN 

StAtl HEAOOUAITflS. tluCKING lUUDtNC. lAlUC" 



r 



> 




RYAN STEVEDORING COMPANY, INC. 




HOME OFFICE 



61 SAINT JOSEPH STREET 



MOBILE. ALABAMA 



Porfs of Operation 

Mobile, Alabama 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 
New Orleans, Louisiana 

Gulfport, Mississippi 

Pascagoula, Mississippi 

Panama City, Florida 

Georgetown, South Carolina 

Militgry Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina 

A Proud Member of the Maritime Industry of North Carolina 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



In Memoriam 

Dr. Christopher Crittenden 



In October, 1969, North Carolina suf- 
fered a severe loss with the death of Dr. 
Christopher Crittenden. 

Our loss was personal too, because it was 
"Chris" Crittenden, as he was affection- 
ately known, who helped crystalize our 
abiding interest in history in the early 30's 
at the University at Chapel Hill. 

Many words have been said for his 
eulogy already and I am sure there will be 
many more stories told about him for years 
to come. 

We sometimes wonder if we, the people 
of North Carolina, realize the importance 
of men like "Chris" Crittenden to our gen- 
eral welfare. Preservation of records, his- 
torical research and publications are really 
necessities for planning and development 
of a community or a nation. 

"Chris" Crittenden left an indelible mark 
on North Carolina. Part of that mark is the 
beautiful new Archives Building in Ral- 
eigh. 




INDEPENDENT GULF LINE INAUGURATES SERVICE 

TO WILMINGTON 



The modern cargoliner M/V HILVERSUM arrived 
in Wilmington July 31st, commencing regular service 
between that city and Europe. In honor of this maiden 
call a reception was held aboard the Dutch flag 
vessel. In attendance were many prominent business- 
men, as well as, Mr. E. P. Dumas of Amsterdam, 
Director of the Independent Gulf Line, and Mr. D. R. 
Netting, Sales Manager of Amerind Shipping Corpora- 
tion, New York, General Agents in the U.S.A. 

Speaking on board the HILVERSUM Mr. Dumas 
said "the fact that we have inaugurated service to 
Wilmington indicates the importance with which we 
in Europe view the growth of trade through this port 
both with regard to exports and imports. Europe has 
an almost insatiable appetite for the product of the 
South Atlantic states. At the same time growing indus- 
trialization and increasing population is creating a 
rapidly growing demand for industrial equipment and 
consumer products of European manufacture." 

"These facts, together with the progressive attitude 
which prevails in the expansion and improvement of 



the port and related facilities in Wilmington have been 
most encouraging to our efforts in providing more 
efficient and economical shipping services with the 
Independent Gulf Line." 

Also attending the reception on board the M/V 
HILVERSUM was Mr. O. W. Waters of Waters 
Shipping Company, Wilmington, local agents for the 
Independent Gulf Line. 




Reading left to right: Mr. Frank DeVries, Captain A. Hedlund, Mrs. A. 
Hedlund, Mr. O. W. Waters, Mr. E. E. Lee, and Mr. E. P. Dumas. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce 

& Exec. A88't. 

RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

L. L. LIVELY, Representative 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of 
Traffic 



HUGH HARDAWAY, Director 
of Engineering 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P.O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations 

Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Tel. 726-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations 

Manager 
JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 
HAROLD KAHL, Supt., Bulk- 
Facility 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 
OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT. Manager 

Tel. 919-457-2621 

P.O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

WALLACE CLARK, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code) 212-269-1843 




AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

Executive Committee 

WOODROW PRICE, Raleigh, Chm. 

L. R. BOWERS, Whiteville, V. Chm. 

SYD DUNN, Greenville, Secretary 

MEMBERS 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 

HENRY BOSHAMER, Morehead City 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville 

RYE PAGE, WilminKlon 

GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

FINANCE 

P.O. Box 3037 28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 



RUFF A. DeVANE, Treasurer 

(Comptroller), Assistant 

Secretary 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149 27602 

Raleigh, N. C 

L. C. BRUCE, Director Public 

Relations, Administrative Ass't. to 

Ports Authority 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



STATE PORTS 



l?> 



FALL ISSUE, 1969, SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 15, NO. 3 



PAGE 

CONTENTS 

New officers SPA 4 

State Fair 6 

World Trade 7 

Harbors of the World 8 

History Land Trail 10 

Agribusiness Mission 12 

Exportunities IS 

Port Information 20 




COVER STORY: 

The story our cover tolls this issue is 
an old one. The theme, of course, is the 
relation between Agriculture and World 
Commerce and Ocean Shipping. Tins 
particular photo simply highlights the 
importance of Port Terminals to Agri- 
culture. It has no recent significance, Bui 
is colorful and thought-provoking. The 
photo itself is one of a large collection 
and unhappily the photographer is un- 
known to US. 



IN THIS ISSUE: 

In ihi\ /ssik ii ( present for the ninth time a <<>n- 
tinuing feature tailed "Roaming the s, i , n Seas with 
Betty Casey." I'ln fetauri is being written t"r us /»/ 
Mrs. C</Mi/ o/ Greenville, North Carolina Vfrs I 
has spent mam/ i/ears traveling, particularly in tin 
orient and tin south seos The ninth featurt 
Beirut, Lebanon. (See /'nivs s and i v 

Photo credits should he given to: s,,,. V ( Dept. 
ol Vrchives and HivIoia. Hugh Morton, Centun 

Studios. 

For information about. Till-: NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE PORTS write oi ell I ('. Bruce, Editor b 
Publisher— State I'oit- Magazine, P.O. Hoy l i l ). 
Raleigh— Published Quarterly. Telephone: (91 l ) 829 
3855* 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




L. to r. Boshamer, Dunn, Page, Price, Anderson are sworn 
Associate Justice Bobbin of Supreme Court of N.C. 




\nderson Lt. Gov. Taylor Price 



Page 



U.il 

A 


1 A 



Woodrow Price freshly sworn into SPA receives 
genuine ship's porthole assembly from Mr. & Mrs. 
Roy Wilder of Raleigh. Information reaching 
editor (grinning in background) is that C & D 
Chairman Gilliam Horton expedited shipment of 
50 lb. gift directly from Cape Fear country near 
Wilmington. 



PORTS AUTHORITY 

ELECTS 

NEW OFFICERS 



On September 30, Governor Scott announced 
the appointment of five new men to the Ports 
Authority'. They were: Henry Boshamer of More- 
head City; Rye Page of Wilmington; E. G. (Andy) 
Anderson of Robersonville; S. W. (Syd) Dunn of 
Greenville; and Woodrow Price of Raleigh, 
by On October 21, in the old Senate Chamber 

of the Capitol, these men were sworn in bv Lt. 
Gov. Pat Taylor, representing Governor Scott. 

They replaced E. N. Richards of Raleigh, who had indi- 
cated a desire to step down after eight years; F. H. Ross of 
Charlotte, who had served seven years; and Lamar Gudger of 
Asheville, a three year veteran who also had asked to be 
relieved. In August, Kirkwood Adams of Roanoke Rapids and 
William Pharr of McAdenville had resigned because of election 
to public office in their respective communities. Ports Authority 
membership and elective offices are held by the Attorney 
General to be in conflict with the dual office holding statute 
of North Carolina. 




Page Dunn Purvis Glenn, Price 



Boshamer Bowers Weathers Andersoi i 



The Ports Authority Annual meeting was held at 2:00 P.M. 
and Woodrow Price was elected Chairman to succeed Richards, 
L. R. Bowers of Whiteville was elected Vice Chairman to 
succeed W. B. Glenn, who is a tobacconist from Greenville. 
Bowers is a banker who was serving as Finance Chairman for 
the Authority. W. S. Dunn was elected Secretary succeeding 
Ross. Ruff A. DeVane was reappointed Assistant Secretary and 
Treasurer to the Authority. DeVane is a career man who is 
also Comptroller of the Authority. Recently the duties and 
responsibilities of his office were set up as the Finance Division 
of the Authority and he reports to the Authority through the 
Finance Committee. James W. Davis continues as Executive 
Director and Administrator over all divisions including Com- 
merce (Development), Traffic, Engineering and Operations at 
Morehead City, Wilmington and Southport. L. C. Bruce con- 
tinues as Administrative Assistant to the Authority and Director 
of Public Relations (Advertising and Promotion included) re- 
porting directly to the Authority through the Public Relations 
Committee. 

The Authority closed its meeting by noting the upcoming 
twenty -fifth anniversary of the SPA's Legislative Birthday. 
W. B. Glenn, Henry Boshamer, and Rye Page were appointed 
a supervisory committee to plan this occasion for a celeDration 
in March 1970. 

A resolution passed acknowledging the meritorious sen-ices 
of E. N. Richards, which reads: 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




N. C. Maritime Building (circa) 196f) located near terminal 
being planned at Morehead City. 



WHEREAS, The North Carolina State Ports 
Authority, holding its Annual Meeting in 
Raleigh, North Carolina on October 21, 
1969, and 

WHEREAS, This date marks the end of the 
tenure of E. N. Richards of Raleigh as 
Chairman of the State Ports Authority, 
and 

WHEREAS, E. N. Richards has served on 
the Ports Authority continuously since 
1961, and 

WHEREAS, In 1962 he was called upon to 
serve as interim Acting Executive Direc- 
tor for eight months of considerable crisis 
in Ports Authority affairs at no compen- 
sation, and 

WHEREAS, In 1963 he was made Vice- 
Chairman of the Ports Authority, serving 
with John M. Reeves, now retired, and 

WHEREAS, Upon the retirement of Mr. 
Reeves he was elevated to the post of 
Chairman by his peers, and 

WHEREAS, During the eight-year period of 
his tenure the outstanding progress of the 
Authority in planning, development, ex- 
pansion, promotion and public acceptance 
has been unprecedented, and 

WHEREAS, During this tenure many na- 
tional periodicals and many well known 
publications have called attention to the 
public of the tremendous growth in North 
Carolina world trade and the expansion of 
the ocean port terminals, and 

WHEREAS, All these things have come to 
pass as a result of the leadership of E. N. 
Richards, and many other accomplishments 
too numerous to record, and 

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, 

That the North Carolina Ports issue a 
citation of commendation for his remark- 
able achievements to E. N. Richards and 
move that this resolution be spread upon 
the minutes of the Ports Authority and 
that copies be sent to the Governor of 
North Carolina and the Members of the 
Council of State, to former Governors 
Terry Sanford and Dan Moore, under whom 
he served with distinction and that a 
permanent award be created to be pre- 
sented to E. N. Richards in a public cere- 
mony, the date of which may be announced 
later. 




it Wilmington. Similar building now 



Gudger Pha 

The North Carolina Ports thus begins a new era of 
growth— from $7,500,000 investment in 1949 to approxi- 
mately $40,000,000 invested in 1969; 16 ships; less 
than 60,000 tons in 1952; revenues less than $100.- 
000.(X). Last year there were 820 vessels ol all classes; 
more than 1,000,000 tons, much of it general cargo; 
with operating revenues of $3,500,000.00. 

Meanwhile North Carolina industry and trade has 
been propelled along at a similar rate of growth and 
now North Carolina is thirteenth in total volume of 
Manufactured Export Trade among the fifty states, 
and fifth in Agricultural Export Trade. Thus it is said 
to be tenth in Total Export— Among the fifty states, a 
rise from fifteenth in 1960. 



American Flag Vessel calls Morehead City. Note traffic in main channel in background. 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




X.C. State Fair — a production of the N. C. Dept. of Agriculture — background 
shows Carter Stadium (the home of the NCSU "Wolfpack"!. 



THE 

NORTH 

CAROLINA 

STATE FAIR 



bv Bob Wills 



The 1969 North Carolina State Fair drew 
its largest paid attendance in its 102 year his- 
tory during die recently completed classic. 
Nearly 515,000 spectators were admitted to 
the grounds during the 9-da\" Fair with 
312,817 paying 81 each. There were nearly 
92,000 children 12 and under admitted free. 
The remainder of die total figure includes non- 
commercial exhibitors and off-duty workers. 
The Fair was considered a very successful ven- 
ture in that the purpose of extending it for a 
three-day period was achieved. Fair officials 
felt that crowded conditions in die small exhibit 
halls was eliminated and that insurance for bad 
weather was at hand, although not needed 
diis year. It was believed that the Fair drew 
approximately the same number of people as 
in recent years, but that attendance figures 
had been badly estimated, often over the one 
million mark for a 6-dav run. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NEWS 



Mr. Robert McLellan, Deputy Assistant Secretary 
of Commerce for Business Development, was the prin- 
cipal speaker for the Sixth Annual Meeting of the 
North Carolina World Trade Association. The Asso- 
ciation's Annual Meeting was held November 6-7 at 
the Downtowner-Coliseum Motor Inn, Charlotte, 
North Carolina. 

Joel B. New, Director of the Greensboro Field Office 
of the Department of Commerce, announced that the 
Regional Export Expansion Council and the Trade 
Association were pleased that Mr. McLellan could 
participate. His responsibilities in coordinating the 
activities of the Bureau of International Commerce 
permitted a first hand report on the new export pro- 
motion plans of the Department. Mr. McLellan is a 
native of Kearney, Nebraska. He came to the Federal 
administration after serving several years as Vice 
President of FMC Coiporation. New said Mr. Mc- 
Lellan was the featured speaker at a banquet on the 
evening of November 6. He also met a joint meeting 
of Regional Export Councils from North and South 



Carolina at Meyers Park Country Club at luncheon on 

that date. 

The Friday morning program of the Annual Meet- 
ing included panel sessions on Export-Import Bank 
financing, reports on opportunities lor foreign exhibi- 
tion, and current reports on trade prospects m coun- 
tries abroad. Officers of the Association were installed 

at a luncheon on the seventh. Representatives of Con- 
sulates and Commercial Sections ol seven other coun- 
tries participated in the two-das event. 

L. C. Bruce, Director of Public Relations lor the 
Ports Authority in Raleigh, moderated one ol the 
panels and E. E. Lee. Director ol the SPA Trade 
Development Division, reported on his recent trip to 
Hong Kong, Australia. Taiwan, and Japan. Bruce, 
who also represented the SPA on a two week mission 
to Japan in 1968, hosted representatives from abroad 
at this NCWTA meeting. The Ports Authority lias par- 
ticipated in this manner in previous Trade conferences 
in 1963, 1965, and 1967. 



Hugh Morton, entrepreneur of Wilmington and developer 
of Grandfather Mountain and related enterprises in West- 
ern North Carolina is also quite a photographer winner 
of many awards. Here we present one of his latest photos. 
This is the new U. S. 74, 76, 421 Highway Bridge across 
the Cape Fear River North and inland of the State Port 
Terminal. The Terminal is in the right foreground. The 
new bridge with multi lanes for heavy traffic is a great 
new asset to highway transportation and truck traffic to 
the terminal and other maritime enterprises along the 
east bank of the river. (Exclusive photo to NCSPA.) 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



~<n 



BEIRUT LEBANON 

FROM FAMED CEDARWOOD 
CARGO TO FREE TRADE 




The American University of Beirut, located on a beautiful 75-acre campus, 
attracts students from over 50 countries 

Photo Courtesy Manoug, Beirut 



"Roaming the Seven Seas with Betty Casey" 

Trade plays a vital role in the life-drama of the fascinat- 
ing little country of Lebanon. It always has. The handker- 
chief-sized, approximately 4000 square mile Biblical 
"land of milk and honey" turned modern, lies midway 
along the easternmost rim of blue Mediterranean waters 
in a strategic position for sea-traffic between countries of 
the Middle East and the Orient and Europe. 

In long ago days, early mariners from Beirut, a second 
millenium B.C., Phoenician, commercial empire city, now 
the capitol, launched ships laden with cedarwood, wheat 
and royal purple dye to Egypt, Rome and other westerly 
points. Nowadays the famed ancient cedars of Lebanon 
have dwindled to a nearby tiny grove of only 400 trees 
which are zealously preserved, and other sources have 
edged out the dye market. Products grown in the high 
fertile Bekaa valley of the Lebanon mountain ridge dividing 
the seashore from the Syrian border include other grains, 
vegetables, corn, apples, mulberries, oranges, pears, nuts, 
cotton, olives, grapes and tobacco. 

Since 1933, free transit trade has been the stock in trade 
for the three ship's basins of the busy modern Beirut port. 
It serves as a general purpose port and focal point for 




At Baalbek, tourists find the ruins of ancient 
Roman temples 

Phoio Courtesy Middle East Airlines 




Beirut's busy port serves much of the Middle East 

Photo Courtesy Aianougj Beirut 



, NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



I 




Beirut today a modern metropolis 

Photo Courtesy National Council of Tourism in Lebanon 



transit goods passing through Lebanon. In 1967 it handled 
2,760 turnarounds of steam ships, petroleum tankers and 
sailboats, and served almost 100,000 passengers. Free zone 
trade added up to 631 thousand metric tons using 132 
thousand square meters of storage space. The Lebanese 
economy has thrived on this strong dose of free trade. 

In Lebanon, modern architecture and technology min- 
gle in gracious harmony with ancient structures, banana 
plantations, orange and olive groves and beautiful crystal- 
clear rivers gushing from grottoes. This charming land 
is enjoyed not only by its almost 2& million inhabitants, 
who benefit from one of the highest Middle East living 
standards, but also by more than 16,000 overseas tourist 
visitors annually and over 800,000 travelers from neigh- 
boring Syria. Over crowding in Lebanon is alleviated by 
the million Lebanese who ventured abroad in search of 
new opportunities and now make their homes overseas, 
especially in Brazil and the United States. 

Tourism, a major foreign exchange earner, suffered a 
great set-back following last year's Middle East war, even 
though the country was not a participant in the conflict. 
Travelers ordinarily visiting nearby Jerusalem and the 
Holy Land, then stopping off in Lebanon to enjoy its 
excellent hotels, historical sights, cool mountains and 
summer resorts, have dwindled in numbers due to war 
time dangers and restrictions. There is a bright note in 
the picture however. 

Archeologists are finding new attractions in Lebanon 
which will prove interesting to tourists. European and 
Arab archeologists have started a widespread series of 
excavations to tap the treasure trove of Lebanese history. 

Wars and invasions have criss-crossed the long history 
of this tiny country leaving mementoes of untold worth 
and interest. Names like Tyre and Sidon, the temples of 
Baalbeck, crusader churches and castles and Islamic 
minarets represent a unique blend of cultures and peoples. 

Among "digs" now being investigated is a cave con- 
taining prehistoric flints, the remains of a pre-Christian 
village and the town where the prophet Elias hid from 
the wrath of Queen Jezebel. Other new excavations at 
Fedar, between the Adonis River and Byblos (from which 
the Bible gets its name) north of Beirut, have turned up 
fossils and bones in a hillside cave dating from the Paleo- 
lithic period. 

Meanwhile, the country's practice of giving high priority 
to the development of its human resources has served to 
steady its economic advance. A literacy rate of over 80%, 



one of the highest anywhere, has resulted from a well 
developed educational system. This is accomplished 
through about 3,000 excellent primary, secondary and 
technical schools and four universities. The American 
University in Lebanon, dating from 1866, accommodates 
about 3,500 students, three quarters of whom come from 
the Arab world. 

Lebanon's banking and insurance facilities have helped 
the country become a financial center for the Middle 
East. A stable currency (3.25 Lebanese Pounds to $1 ), 
the unrestricted movement of gold and funds, and bank 
secrecy laws are factors in Lebanon's development as an 
important financial market. Numbered bank accounts 
attract foreign capital to the country. 

Long established adaptability to change continues to 
prove advantageous to Lebanon. Closure of the Suez 
Canal resulted in a rise in Lebanon's sales of manufactured 
goods to neighboring Arab States. The country's relatively 
skilled labor force and good handling and distribution 
facilities have made it possible to capitalize on this un- 
expected turn of affairs. Closure of the Canal also resulted 
in doubling transit cargo through the Port of Beirut. 
Merchandise amounting to about $300 million, of which 
petroleum accounts for about three quarters, passes an- 
nually in transit through the facilities. 

Despite the scarcity of raw materials, Lebanon is one 
of the most industrialized countries in the Middle East 
and it continues to develop further. There is some heavy 
industry but light industry, such as food processing and 
textiles predominate. The principal products include sugar, 
cigarettes, beverages, cotton and wool fabrics, furniture, 
shoes and other leather goods, paper and silk. 

Lebanon became a Republic in 1944 when it gained its 
freedom from the French Vichy government. During this 
twenty -five year period of independence, U.S. aid of $100.4 
million has been provided for Lebanon through economic 
loans and grants and military grants. Part of this has been 
repaid. 

In a speech made in 1967, His Excellency Charles 
Helou, President of the Republic of Lebanon said, "Despite 
its small size and population and limited natural resources. 
Ours is a great country. Its greatness derives from the 
intelligence of its people, tin- value of its traditions and its 
courage under adversity . . ." 

Who can doubt that the port of Beirut will continue 
to serve, as it has from time immemorial, as a principal 
gateway to the Middle East? 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



9 



SOMERSET PLACE 
THE COLLINS PLANTATION ON LAKE PHELPS 



WJ^:*'*; f 




By Elizabeth W. Wilborn, Historic Sites Researcher 
State Department of Archives and History 



The mansion house on Lake Phelps for the Collins 
family was not built until almost a century after a 
development company attempted to improve this 
large swampy region of Washington and Tyrrell coun- 
ties. A group of Halifax and Edenton men tried in the 
1780s to drain the lake; similar efforts by the Lake 
Company to make the lake profitable were to continue 
for approximately thirty years. In 1816 Josiah Collins, 
Jr., bought the remaining shares of stock in the com- 
pany at an executor's sale. 

When Collins became the sole owner of the lake 
plantation he was free to develop a country estate. 
The building of Somerset Place Mansion in the 1830's 
climaxed this development. 

The Collinses' nearest neighbor were the Pettigrews, 
who owned "Bonarva," and "Belgrade." Some of the 
most detailed accounts of the building of the mansion 
house are to be found in the Pettigrew family letters. 
There were many similarities in the farming methods 
used by the Collins and Pettigrews, but their social 
lives varied greatly. 

Charles Pettigrew, though never consecrated, was 
first bishop-elect of the Episcopal Church of North 
Carolina. His rather strict interpretation of the "joys 
of living" differed from that of his Collins neighbors. 
Though each household reflected refinement and 
appreciation for the better things of life, the Collinses 
led a far more brilliant and sophisticated existence 
than any of the Pettigrews. 

Early in January, 1830, activity at Somerset Place 
reached fever pitch for Josiah III and his bride, Mary 
Riggs of Newark, were expected to move into the 
Colony House. Here the young couple lived while the 



mansion was being built. When the spacious house 
was completed it became a real gathering place for 
family and friends. Christmas holidays were cele- 
brated with readings, tea-drinkings, suppers, and 
musicales for the enjoyment of everyone; "Southern 
hospitality" was extended to guests from far and near. 
When the Collins were at home during the winter 
months a reading "club" was organized; the Monday 
evening sessions were spent reading aloud with music 
and singing at interludes. Their entertainment at home 
was offset by trips to the fashionable watering places 
during the summer. When the leaves began to turn, 
guests and relatives returned with the Collinses for 
the winter season. One season was enlivened by a 
"Quadrille every night." The big house situated twenty 
feet from the canal was the center of culture for 
miles around. 

One can imagine this idyllic existence— a comfor- 
table home surrounded by huge cypress trees over- 
looking a large lake. Yet tragedy was to plague the 
Collins family— three of the sons died accidently 
while quite young; two of the boys drowned in the 
canal and the other died in a riding accident. 

William Pettigrew wrote, "The canal has been an 
unfortunate place for Mr. C.'s family." The important 
drainage channel and transportation system exacted 
an awesome toll! 

As the Civil War approached, the Lake Phelps fami- 
lies were caught in the political crisis. Forced to 
refugee to Hillsborough in 1862, the Collinses were 
saddened while there by the death of Josiah III. After 
the war his sons were unable to revive the plantation 
and finally sold Somerset Place. By 1900 all of the 
Collins family had left the Lake Phelps area. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



The land has been resettled and is today a typical 
farm community. 

The mansion House? It, too has been "saved." The 
Department of Conservation and Development through 
the Division of State Parks, has operated Pettigrew 
State Park, site of the Collins and Pettigrew planta- 
tion houses for several years. The park continues to 
be under the supervision of the above named agency, 
but in 1965 the mansion and immediate environs were 
transferred to the State Department of Archives and 
History. On September 6, 1969, Somerset Place State 
Historic Site was formally dedicated. The yellow 
painted house gleamed in the sunlight. Under the 
moss-hung trees miniskirts replaced the ruffled hoop- 
skirts of ante-bellum days. There were speakers and 
hunting and the brisk notes of a famous marching 
band sounded across the serene lake. No one present 
could have danced a quadrille! But there was laughter 
and joy and friendship— so where were the Collinses? 




Lighting enhances the beauty of Somerset at twilight. 

The Collins family was there, more than a hundred 
strong! With a Josiah VI and a Josiah VII and 
Cadwallader Jones Collins to reminisce of the days 
of long ago. They visited the mansion house, the 
Colony House, the kitchen, the ice house, the dairy, 
and other dependencies. Somerset Place is open to 
visitors on a regularly scheduled year-round basis; 
hostesses give guided tours. Adjacent is Pettigrew 
State Park and camping facilities. 

The breezes blow across the lake, the sun sets, the 
gnarled cypress cast weird shadows across the mansion 
house — all is well, however, for Somerset Place is alive 
again. 



Central hallway at the Collins' mansion. 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



11 



A. J. Haynes Gene Carroll Jack Lee Jim Graham 




Governor Scott Harold B. Scott F. B. Fishburne Robert Leak 

In 1960 the N. C. State Ports Authority began to 
promote a close relationship with agriculture. This 
relationship has grown to be very profitable in many 
ways. (See cover. ) 

At about the same time the Wachovia Bank and its 
correspondent banks were sending business and agri- 
cultural leaders on trips called Agribusiness Tours. 
In 1963 eighty of these men went to Denmark, Hol- 
land, Germanv on the first Agribusiness Tour of 
Europe. Former Governor Luther Hodges was then 



Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce, but 
he had gained recognition earlier by a 1959 business 
mission to Europe as Governor of N. C. The success 
of this mission can be measured in many ways, in- 
cluding two European Industries investing in North 
Carolina plants, one at Charlotte and one at More- 
head City. Heavily committed in the 1959 mission 
were members of the Ports Authority. 

In 1968 another Agribusiness group from North 
Carolina went to Japan, participating with thirteen 
other states' representatives on a promotional visit 
sponsored by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. 
The Ports Authority was represented by its P.R. 
Director. 

In 1969 the C & I Division of the Department of 
Conservation and Development organized a highly 
specialized group for an Agribusiness mission to 
Australia, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Japan. E. E. Lee, 
Director of Commerce, was representative of the Ports 
Authority. 

On these pages is a pictorial history of some of Mr. 
Lee's visits on the mission and prior to take off. 

His stop in Taiwan was highlighted by a visit to the 
China Union Lines, Ltd., whose ships are frequent 
visitors to N. C. Ports. 



THE RETURN OF 




Lee greets former Raleigh residents in Tokyo — Mr. 
International Dept. of JMC, Mr. O-Kumada, "K" 
Yamada. Chief Materials Section, JMC. 



Itoh, new Chief of 
lines, and Mr. Y. 



In Tokyo Mr. Lee visited with representatives of 
the Japan Monopoly Coqwration formerly stationed 
in Raleigh. 

Today, 1969, ten years after the first N. C. mission 
abroad, North Carolina has risen in World Trade to 
10th place among the 50 states. The ports have grown 
from a nine million investment in 1959 to facilities at 
Wilmington and Morehead City with a net investment 
of over forty million in 1969. Over one million tons of 
cargo crossed the docks last year. 300 vessels from 
Japan, 500 vessels from other countries and our own 
Flag lines make calls each year at the terminals. Port 
terminal income has risen from $700,000 in 1959 to 
$3,500,000 in 1969. 

Small wonder that Morehead City and Wilmington 
have become known as the fastest growing ports in 
eastern United States and that the advertisement and 
promotion programs of the terminals has received top 
award made by the American Association of Ports 
Authorities for the past three years. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




SPA representative Lee pins 
"Tar Heel" on President C- 
Chao of China Union Lines 
Ltd. This is the home office 
of the Lines in Taipei. 



rHE TAR HEELS 



U. S. Port Open for HK Trade 

Hongkong Standard Shipping Sews September 



1969 



A United States port executive is now in Hongkong 
to encourage shippers and shipping lines to call at 
North Carolina ports. 

Mr. E. E. Lee, Jr., executive assistant and director 
of commerce, North Carolina State Ports Authority, 
will confer with representatives of shipping lines and 
freight forwarders on shipping cargo through North 
Carolina ports, Wilmington and Morehead City, in 
the east coast of the U. S. 

Mr. Lee, Jr. who is here as member of the North 
Carolina trade mission to Hongkong, pointed out the 
Ports Authority of North Carolina is developing the 
shipping facilities both at Morehead City and Wil- 
mington. 



A boy and his dog are al- 
ways good subjects. Note: 
When N.C Agribusiness 
Mission returned. Verne 
Strickland of WRAL-TV in 
Raleigh made this photo in 
Hong Kong. He was official 
photographer. 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



L3 




SOUTHERN 



CORPORATION 



FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 
CU STOM HOUSE BROKERS 
F.M.C. NO. 469 



P. O. BOX 3745 . WILMINGTON, N. C. 28401 
PHONES: (IMPORT) 919-762-9655 
(EXPORT) 919-762-9651 
TWX 510-937-0311 . CABLE "SOUTHOVER" 



MOREHEAD CITY 
NORTH CAROLINA 



BATON ROUGE 
LOUISIANA 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

0. E. DuRANT 

SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 

Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobile Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 

Telephone RO 2-4232 

Water & Market Sts. 



LITHO INDUSTRIES, 
INCORPORATED 



P. O. Box 12462 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Serving North Carolina For 
All Her Printing Needs 




Telephone (919)782-1314 
782-1315 

PRINTING 

PUBLICATIONS 

CASEBOOK 

MANUFACTURING 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Drawer E 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS • STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 
RICHARD BARKER, Vice-President, Luckenbach 

Steamship Co., Inc. 
W. MURLE TEACHEY, Assistant General Manager 
E. MAYO HOLMES, Treasurer 
A. P. BLAND, Operations Manager 
P. C. WEST, Export Manager 
JACK C. JOYNER, Traffic Representative 
WILLIAM A. SUMMERLIN, Traffic Representative 
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 
P.O. Drawer E. Tel: (919) 726-2511 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
CARL ROWE, Assistant to the Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



1) 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Well go the extra mile 

for your international 

banking business. 



We'll go wherever you need us. To Paris, 
London, Nairobi and all around the world. 
We'll obtain foreign monies and write letters 
of introduction to foreign banks for you. 
We'll locate foreign suppliers for your busi- 
ness and issue commercial letters of credit. 
We'll help you arrange licensing of your 



products in foreign markets. We'll be your 
international business partner. Just call us in 
the International Department at area code 
704/372-3456. Or write us at Post Office 
Box 10794 Charlotte, North Carolina28201. 



First Union National *J 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



15 




barber 



Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

• 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 



6HR66R 



STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 



GENERAL AGENTS 

New York— 17 Battery Place 

Cleveland— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 

Chicago— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 

Detroit— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1814 First Federal Bldg. 

Agent: Moreheod City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



was w,th 

CARTERET . . . 



f " 

B. ^^^^m 



. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Morehead City, N. C. 

Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 




- 



INDUSTRY 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schoole, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 



. 



For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



-. 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Bird. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



TRAVEL COUNCIL MEETS IN WILMINGTON 



STEELE 



The Travel Council of North Carolina has in its 
fifteen year history promoted and assisted in many 
events and programs helpful to the eastern or coastal 
plain region of North Carolina. 

The Coastal Plains Regional Commission is a Tri- 
State Governmental Agency created under the John- 
son Administration to match the Appalachia Program 
by promoting the under-developed areas of South 
Carolina, Georgia, and North Carolina Coastal regions. 

So it was that the Federal Co-Chairman of the Com- 
mission, who is Fred G. Steele formerly of Durham, 
came to visit the Travel Council on October 27 and 
made the principal address at the Annual Banquet 
held at the Blockade Runner Motel-Hotel, near Wil- 
mington, N. C. 

Mr. Steele assured the members of the Travel 
Council of his interest in the travel business, some- 
times called tourism by professional promoters. He, 
also, paid particular attention to the idea of a four 
lane road as proposed bv a consulting firm from South 
Carolina 

This four lane interstate tvpe road would run 
from I 26 in the heartland of South Carolina to Wil- 
mington, N. C. thus connecting the port to the Cleve- 
land area in Ohio. 




While in Wilmington, the last of three port cities 
he visited in the three states, Mr. Steele conferred 
with Colonel Dennison and his staff at U. S. Corps 
of Army Engineers Office. Next day accompanied 6) 
President Abel Girault of the N. C. Travel Council, 
he toured the N. C. State Port Terminal at Wilming- 
ton before returning to Washington, D. C. 



Wi/mingfon 
Shipping Company 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

& 

STEVEDORES 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1809 (able Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Pox 27086 
Charlotte, N. C. 2S20S Morehead City, N. C. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. 0. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C. 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



i: 



EXPORTUNITIES 



tor INCREASED SALES AM) PROFITS 



Joel B. New 

U. S. Dept. of Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950, Room 408 



Post Office Bldg. 
Greensboro, N. C. 
(919) 275-9111 



BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON 

Nigeria— Polyester blended yams (65/35) 100,000 lbs. 
per month. 

Australia — Textile mill products — finished cotton broad- 
woven fabrics (made in weaving mills); specifically cotton 
and cotton brocade lengths in rolls for fabric trade. 

BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, MANMADE FIBER, 
SILK 

Japan — Glass fibre draperies, close-out or second grade. 

Australia — Textile mill products — finished manmade fiber, 
silk broadwoven fabrics made in weaving mills; specific- 
ally manmade synthetic, silk lengths in rolls for fabric 
trade. 

BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, WOOL 

Australia — Textile mill products — finished wool and worsted 
broadwoven apparel fabrics made in weaving mills; 
specifically wool and worsted lengths in rolls for fabric 
trade. 

KNITTING MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Australia — Lace (knit); including ornamental lace edging 
for lingerie and apparel; 36" and 45" rolls of lace fabric; 
elasticized lace as used in lingerie, corsetry. 

YARN THREAD MILLS, PRODUCTS 

Australia — Finished thread for use in the home; including 
manmade fiber thread, cotton, nylon and silk sewing thread, 
embroidery and hand-work cotton thread. 

SOAP, DETERGENTS, CLEANING PREPARATIONS, 
PERFUMES, COSMETICS 

Germany — Surface active agents, emulsifiers. 

FARM MACHINERY 

Netherlands — Farm silos, cattle feeding equipment, liquid 
manure, slurry pumps. 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Australia — Textile machinery — cutting room equipment; 
specifically equipment for shearing, strip cutting, slashing, 



measuring, notching, etc. and related cutting room equip- 
ment; hand punches for fabrics. I 

Iran — Textile machinery, equipment for spinning, weaving 
cotton, viscose yarns. 

Turkey — Machinery for manufacture of wool rugs. 
Pakistan — Machinery for packing with aluminum-paper 
foil (U.S. type ) for 20 cigarettes in each pack with capacity 
of 200 packs per minute; cellophane wrapping machinery 
for these cigarettes packs with capacity of 200 packs per 
minute; hook-up device to link cigarette packing machine 
with cellophane wrapping machine. 

MOTOR VEHICLES, MOTOR VEHICLE EQUIPMENT 

Colombia — Spare parts, accessories for automotive ve- 
hicles. 

Paraguay — Motor vehicle parts, accessories; new and 
rebuilt. 

COSTUME JEWELRY, NOVELTIES, BUTTONS, 
NOTIONS 

Israel — Costume jewelry, costume novelties, ornaments of 
all materials; imitation jewelry, vanity cases, compacts, 
miscellaneous notions. 

Australia — Fasteners buckles, clasps, studs, similar notions; 
specifically metal buckles for wearing apparel, including 
those covered with fabric or other material; clasps, in- 
cluding those used for fastening wasitband of men's 
trousers, and those used for fastening bikini tops at mid- 
back; plastic press studs for apparel; snap fasteners, sew-on 
and other types, for apparel. 

SPECIAL INDUSTRY MACHINERY 

Germany — Bakery machines, other food processing ma- 
chines. 

SERVICE INDUSTRY MACHINES 

Switzerland — Household water softeners, filters, condi- 
tioners, semi-automatic, automatic. 



AT PRESS TIME 



The American As- 
sociation of Ports 
adjourned its annual 
meeting in San 
Francisco this year 
with election of of- 
ficers for the up- 
coming year. On 
Friday, October 31, 
it was announced 
that Ray S. Watts 

of the Port of San Francisco will move 




James W. Davis 



up to the Presidency; Jan Oenes of 
Curacao will go to First Vice President; 
and George Baldwin, of Portland, Ore- 
gon, will serve as Second Vice President. 
The North Carolina Ports were hon- 
ored when James W. Davis was elected 
Third Vice President and a member of 
the Executive Committee. Davis, who 
is Executive Director for the N. C. State 
Ports Authority, is thereby elected to 
the office that will traditionally bring him 
to the Presidency of this North Ameri- 
can Association of Port Directors and 
Officers in 1972. 



There were 500 delegates in attend- 
ance representing public and private 
terminals. 

Also the North Carolina Ports adver- 
tising program placed fourth in Inter- 
national competition. This is the third 
successive year the advertising has been 
among the leaders in recognition. In 
1967, First Place, Domestic and overall 
winner in all categories; 1968, Third 
Place in all categories; and now Fourth 
in International. There were forty entries 
from Ports and Terminals over the 
North America. 



18 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Avoid foreign 
entanglements. 



Expanding your 
operations abroad? 
Interested in overseas 
trade? Then count on 
having to unravel some 
complicated negotiations 
and market regulations. 
And plenty of paperwork. 
But take 
courage. 



We can help you cut 
the red tape. 

Wachovia has on-the-spot 
contacts in over 100 
countries. And world 
banking specialists in 
affiliate banks in London, 
Paris and New York. We 
have the facilities and the 
personnel to handle any 
international banking 
situation. Including 
financing. 

So before you get caught 
at loose ends, contact 
Wachovia. Now. 

International Dept. 

Wfetchovia 

Bank & Trust, N.A. 



Winston-Salem, N. C. 27102 • Phone: 761-5000 

Member F.D.I.C. 

Cable: WACHOVIA TELEX: 806426 

Ans. Back: WACH INTL WSL 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




W. H. Frirderichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3.695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneouslv. Additional 
1.045 ft. of wharf in 1969. 



TANKER BERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported by tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, modern. 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506.000 
square feet. 

OPEN BERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf. 
backed up bv 15 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible bv rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 522.962 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. BONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
bv arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 273.000 square feet. 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
equipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
bv truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal property. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
conveniently located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour dutv. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantrv crane (at 
70 ft. radius ) can be used in tandem with either of 
the 45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc.. tractors, cargo trailers. 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-type cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ship's tackle and open top railcars 
possible by prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses: ramps for easy access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Brokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 





Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 

available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge svs- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse space available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKACE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 
clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 
Tractors and trailers. 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths 6 and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes may be used m 
tandem with 1.50 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port of entry 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual eapacit) 

bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacit\ of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OR UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easv access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cvanidc and acritet fumigation facilities. Two l J.(KI() 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern A & EC Rail- 
wax System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 

SECURITY: Security force on duty at all tunes 




&fc 










In RALEIGH. CHARLOTTE and other fine North Carolina Communities ■ CAPITAL 



ANDSURPUJSTOVER $30,000,000 ■ Member F. D. I. C. ■ ©First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company 1965 



BEAUFORT-MOREHEAD RAILROAD 

Serves Radio Island 

and the Deepwater Port, Nearest to the 

Open Sea 
IN MID-AMERICA 



Look at this Photo 




N. C. Ports Authority General Cargo Terminal and Phosphate Complex 




ivt -W •- 



Beaufort Harbor at Morehead City 
Radio Island 




Land Lease Arrangements 
Tank and Liquid 

Import-Export Terminal Leases 
Construction for all types of Liquid 

Ocean Shipping, Planning and 

Financing Available 
Located within 500 miles of 50% 

of the population of the United States 



Write or Call 

A. T. LEARY JR. 

16 Broad Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

Telephone: (919) 728-2131 



: - 



WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents and Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr.. Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 WACHOVIA BUILDING 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 28401 



TELEPHONE 
(919) 763-5186 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 



F M.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 
P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704—392-3171 

Charlotte, N. C. 28208 
Citi2ens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P. 0. Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



^ikkMiL. 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

& 

STEVEDORES 



300 Arendell Street 



Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and serving it well! 



The 10,200-mile Southern Railway System 
connects Morehead City with major population 
centers in the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern innovations in equipment and 
service are designed to meet specific shipper 
needs with a dependable, one-management 



transportation network that can save you time, 

money and trouble. 

On your next import or export shipment, 
ship Southern— and see! Contact 
the men in our Sales Office at 
New Bern, N. C, P.O. Box 909, 
or telephone (919) ME 7-6877. 





INNOVATIONS THAT SQUEEZE THE WASTE OUT OF DISTRIBUTION / SOUTHERN RAILW. 



EM WASHINGTON. D C 



N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



L f§WS!¥?N M 8 T aih§SA LL JUDICIAL 
RALEIGH NC 2760? 



IUIK RATE 
U 5. Poitog* 

PAID 

Rol«>0> N C 
Pctmn No 37 



we were 



tere 12 years before 
he dollar bill. 



In 1862 the first paper currency was 
introduced to the U.S. 
Our company was founded in 

850 

And we've been making friends in the 
maritime business ever since. 
Today, Luckenbach serves the shipping 
industry through a network of marine 
terminals, stevedoring companies, and 
agencies throughout the south. 

Luckenbach 




Steamship Company, Inc. 
120 Wall Street 
New York, N. Y. 10004 
Luckenbach Philadelphia, Camden • Heide Company Wilmington, Morehead City; North Carolina 
Caldwell Company Jacksonville, Brunswick, Fernandina • Shaw Company Port Canaveral, Port Everglades, Miami, West Palm Beach • Luckenbach Tampa 



%vtf6, &vioUwi 

STATE PORT 

WINTER 1970 

n I 

f.is/t 



s 



North Carolina State CToTwy 
Raieigh 

N. CL 

Doc. 



]— 4 ll 



| . , -A, tl . . 



i 



9 



y-4* 






Z 



■WIS 






/ / 



J 



'I si Ml. 




«/-t ^W' ^K 




Venturing into foreign trade fields on our own globe can be almost 

as unfamiliar. Regulations, red tape, market information, credit, collections 

and monetary exchange are only a few of the considerations involved. 

So when your customer needs help in buying or selling abroad, you need 

Wachovia. Our world-wide banking specialists keep close ties 

with banks in more than 100 countries. And we can handle transactions directly 

through our affiliate banks: Henry Ansbacher & Co. Ltd., London; Banque Europee'nne 

de Financement, Paris and The American International Bank, New York. 

When it comes to international know-how, we can help you 
make a big impression. Almost everywhere. 

International Division 

WACHOVIA BANK AND TRUST, N.A. 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ' 



Cable: WACHOVIA Telex : 806426 Ans. Back: WACH INTL WSL Tel 761-5435 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Barber Lines L6 

Beaufort & Morehead Railroad 23 

Carteret County 24 

Carteret Towing Co., Ine L6 

DuRant, O. E. Ship Chandler II 

First Union National Bank 15 

Heide Company II 

Luckenbach Steamship Co., Ine Back Cover 

fii-Page Co 21 

Litho Industries, Ine 11 

Maersk Line II 

Morehead City Shipping Co 24 

Morehead Citv Line Handling Co., Ine L6 

New Hanover County K"> 

North Carolina Motor Carriers Assn 1 

N. C. National Bank 19 

Southern Overseas Corporation 14 

Southern Railway Inside Back Cover 

Wachovia Bank & Trust Co Inside Front Cover 

Walker Taylor Insurance 17 

Waters Shipping Co 24 

Waterfront Services, Ine L6 

Wilmington Shipping Co 17 

Woodbury Insurance Agency 24 



IF 

YOU'VE 

GOT 

IT 



A 

TRUCK 
BROUGHT 
IT! 



From Shipside 

TO YOUR VERY DOOR 



By Truck 



The N C Trucking Industry 
serves the fine North Corolino Ports 

NORTH CAROLINA MOTOR CARRIERS ASSN 

Stilt HlAOOUAtUIS, tlUCKINC IUHD4NG. lAKlCH 



r BRUCE-"Hail and Farewell" after 10 years -i 



Dear Advertisers and Readers, 

This is my last issue of 40 successive efforts for 
this periodical. After 10 years, I leave the Ports 
Authority to seek more fertile fields and more 
tranquil seas. 

You have been great — your patronage, comments 
and criticisms have been most helpful. I do not 
mean to sound as if I am retiring from the human 
race. I step aside only for J. Edgar Kirk to take 
the helm and I hope you will stay with him. 

He makes some observations of his own on the 
next page. His picture has appeared here many 
times. He has been chairman of the REEC and 
president of N.C.W.T.A., both organizations in 
which we have been closely associated. 

If you should wish to correspond with me. my 
home address is 
L. C. Bruce 

1522 Canterburrv Road 
Raleigh, N. C. 27608 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE I'OKTS 



The Tar Heel of The Week 

Charles R. McNeill: 
State Port Manager 




By Roy Hardee 

Staff Writer 

Charles R. McNeill, 
operations manager of the 
Morehead City state ports 
terminal, almost entered the 
medical field, but a desire to 
"go to sea" won out and 
marked a turning point in his 
life. 

A Whiteville native whose 
grandfather and father had 
been in the drug store 
business in Columbus county, 
McNeill naturally considered a 
medical career. 

But a stronger desire to 
travel the world by sea was 
finally realized with the start 
of World War H. McNeill 
entered the Merchant Marine 
Academy at Kings Point, 
N.Y. 

His first voyage on a combat 
cargo ship logged 15,800 miles. 
His ship came under atack by 
submarines while off the 
Carolina coast. The ship was 
not hit but one attacking sub 
was sunk in view of the 
convoy. 

His ship was the first cargo 
vessel to enter Hamburg after 



the war.- "It was totally 
wrecked," McNeill said. 

McNeill says he still likes 
the sea but adds that "it's a 
life for a single man." 

When his father became ill, 
McNeill left the Merchant 
Marine at a time when he 
lacked only three months 
before he could get his 
master's license. He entered a 
partnership with his father 
and his brother John, the firm 
trading as J. A. McNeill & 
Sons. 

While he was in the Merch- 
ant Marine, McNeill developed 
his interest in painting and 
recorded scenes around the 
world. That interest, 
encouraged by his mother, 
who is also an artist, led to his 
job with the North Carolina 
Ports Authority. 

North Carolina port officials 
first heard of McNeill when 
the South Carolina Ports 
Authority purchased some of 
his coastal paintings to 
promote the Port of 
Charleston. McNeill was asked 
to do similar work for the 
North Carolina ports which 
were undergoing many 
changes. His paintings began 
to appear on the cover of the 
official North Carolina ports 



publication and he was hired 
as assistant manager at 
Morehead City when the port 
opened in 1953. He was 
promoted to operations 
manager in 1964. 

McNeill has continued his 
interest in art and has just 
published a portfolio of eight 
paintings, "A Watercolor Tour 
Along the Carteret Coast." A 
number of his paintings will be 
used in a special pre- 
Christmas edition of Southern 
Living magazine. 

"I still find plenty to paint," 
McNeill said, "but time is the 
big factor. I usually paint at 
night or on weekends." 

The rapid growth of the 
Morehead City port has kept 
McNeill on the go. 

Six general cargo ships and 
one tanker can now be handled 
at one time. About 100 persons 
are employed directly by the 
port. Longshoremen number 
up to 500 when traffic is heavy 
and there are also the harbor 
pilots, tug boat crews, customs 
employes and others. 

"It's a changing picture with 
increased handling of lumber 
and phosphate," McNeill said. 
Larger lumber shipments will 
come in months to come, 
primarily from South America 
and West Africa. Phosphate 
shipments already are at the 



100,000-ton-a-year goal set 
when the rich Beaufort County 
phosphate fields were first 
tapped. 

At times it has been good to 
have a Scotsman like McNeill 
at the helm to butt heads with 
the many problems which 
develop: 

"They keep popping up but 
we keep knocking them down. 
There are many new 
important things in the 
making for Morehead and the 
state in general. 

"Morehead's port is just 
being discovered. More lines 
and endless new products are 
being shipped to and from the 
port. This port hasn't even 
scratched the surface yet. . . . 

"Sometimes I think we are 
more of a weekend port but 
we work when there is work to 
be done. Since we enjoy 
service from both South 
Atlantic and North Atlantic 
lines, many U.S. and foreign 
vessels use Morehead for a 
liberty port." 

McNeill believes growth of 
fhe Morehead area will be 
helped by development of deep 
water transportation and a 
marine sciences laboratory. 

He said he became interest- 
ed in marine science because 
of love of the sea and "in self- 



de f ense." His son was 
interested in the subject and 
many of his friends are with 
either the Duke Marine Lab or 
the U.S. Bureau of 
Commercial Fisheries. "I was 
forced to learn in order to 
communicate," McNeill said. 

McNeill is active in 
community and area affairs. 
A sailboat enthusiast, he is 
vise commodore of the 
Morehead City Yacht Club. 
His pride and joy is "True 
Core Sound Sharpie," a 21-foot 
sailing craft of considerable 
age. 

McNeill has served as 
president of the Morehead 
City Rotary and Carteret 
County Chamber of 
Commerce. He is a member of 
the First Methodist Church, 
Neuse River Development 
Association, the county 
industrial council, Carteret 
County Marine Resources 
Committee and the national 
defense executive staff. 

McNeill met his wife, the 
former Frances Sansbury, in 
Whiteville where she was 
employed as a medical 
secretary. Their daughter, 
Jan, is a rising senior at 
Merdith and 17-year-old Chuck 
is a senior at West Carteret 
High. Seven-year-old Angus 
completes the family. 



KIRK COMMENTS ABOUT BRUCE 



It's fashionable, in this the second month of the 
new decade, to reflect on the "happenings" of the 
past ten years. 

L. C. Bruce, editor of the North Carolina State 
Ports, is relinquishing that role with this issue. 

He burst on the ports scene about ten years 
ago, billed as the "Savant of Siler City". The ports 
at that time were 15 years old and suffering from 
the usual problems of adolescence. . .not the least 
of which is identity within the family, and recog- 
nition from outsiders. 

L. C, with teenage children of his own, recog- 
nized the symptoms and set out to help his adopted 
charges at Wilmington and Morehead City achieve 
the recognition they deserved. He created the 
North Carolina State Ports Magazine as we know 
it today. 

An examination of these early efforts is a study 
in contrasts. On the one hand L. C. recognized he 
had two sturdy siblings. At the same time, he was 
perplexed on how to glamorize a pair of teenage 



terminals that were growing so rapidly that it was 
impossible to keep them properly clothed to make 
them presentable for their public. 

Months went by, as they inevitably will, and so 
furious was L. C.'s efforts to sell the merits of the 
ports to the public, as well as customers, he was 
tagged by many as the "Peripatetic One." His 
efforts began to pay dividends and as the ports 
matured, so did this publication. 

Today, with a circulation in excess of 10,000, 
The North Carolina State Ports Magazine is con- 
sidered one of the best of its kind. . .a crestomathy 
if you will. . .something for everyone. Thanks to 
L. C.'s efforts, his wards are clothed in respect- 
ability and welcomed in the public as well as pri- 
vate sectors. 

To L. C. our thanks for making the transition 
a smooth one, and our best wishes for "The ubiq- 
uitous One", as he returns to private enterprise. 

J. Edgar Kirk 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

ADMINISTRATION 

JAMES W. DAVIS, Executive Director 



E. E. LEE, JR., Director of Commerce 

& Exec. A88't. 

RAY MATTHIS, Representative 

L. L. LIVELY, Representative 



H. C. JACKSON, Director of 
Traffic 



HUGH HARDAWAY, Director 
of Engineering 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

P.O. Box 3037-28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 

W. H. FRIEDERICHS, Operations 

Manager 



MOREHEAD CITY OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

State Port Terminal 

Drw. 648-28557 

Tel. 726-3158 

TWX 510-924-2983 

CHARLES McNEILL, Operations 

Manager 

JIM EDMUNDSON, Tobacco Supt. 

HAROLD KAHL, Supt., Bulk 

Facility 



SOUTHPORT OFFICE 

OPERATIONS 

H. A. SCHMIDT. Manager 

Tel. 919-457-2621 

P.O. Box 578-28461 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

TRADE DEVELOPMENT 

WALLACE CLARK, Manager 

Suite 767, 26 Broadway 

New York, N. Y. 10004 

(Area Code) 212-269-1843 




AUTHORITY MEMBERS 

Executive Committee 

WOODROW PRICE, Raleigh, Chm. 

L. R. BOWERS, Whiteville, V. Chm. 

SYD DUNN, Greenville, Secretary 

MEMBERS 

E. G. ANDERSON, Robersonville 

HENRY BOSHAMER, Morehead City 

W. B. GLENN, Greenville 

RYE PAGE, Wilmington 

GEORGE PURVIS, Fayetteville 

H. L. WEATHERS, Shelby 



WILMINGTON OFFICE 

FINANCE 

P.O. Box 3037 28401 

Tel. 919-763-1621 

TWX 510-937-0330 



RUFF A. DeVANE, Treasurer 

(Comptroller), Assistant 

Secretary 



RALEIGH OFFICE 

PUBLIC INFORMATION 

10 E. Jones St. 

Tel. 919-829-3855 

Box 149 27602 

Raleigh, N. C 

EDGAR KIRK, Director Public 

Relations, Administrative Aae't. to 

Ports Authority 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION 



STATE PORTS 



2 



2 



WINTER ISSUE, 1970 SPA MAGAZINE 



VOL. 15. NO. 4 



PAGE 

CONTENTS 

Bruce Departs 1 

McNeill Honored 2 

Visitors From Mexico 4 

Motor Carriers Report 5 

Harbors of the World 8 

History Land Trail 10 

Exportunities 18 

Port Information 20 



STATE PORTS 



— 




COVER STORY: 

The painting is an original water- 
color for SPA magazine by Charles 
McNeill (see opposite). The sailboat 
is the last of the clubfooted Core 
Sound Sharpies. It is an ancient rig, 
and formerly used in large numbers 
by fisherman near Morehead City. 
McNeill owns the rig and has named 
her "Idie," a nickname for his mother, 
Whiteville resident who used to sail 
from Swansboro to Morehead in a 
Sharpie. 



IN THIS ISSUE: 

In this issue we present for the tenth time a 
continuing feature culled "Roaming the >■ i 
Seas with Betty Casey." The feature is being 
written for us by Mrs. Casey oj Greenville, North 
Carolina. Mrs. Casey has spent many near* travel- 
ing particularly in the orient and the south seas. 
The tenth feature is about Lisbon. Portugal. (set 

pages, 8 and 9 1. 



Photo credits should he given to: N. C. Dept of 

Archives and History. Hugh Morton. Century 
Studios, L. C. Bruce. 

For information about: I III" NORTH ( VROl IN \ 
STATE PORTS write or call Edgai Kirk, Editor 6 
Publishcr— State Ports Magazine, P.O Bon L49, 
Raleigh -Published Quarterly. Telephone: (91 

1855 



NORTH CAROLINA STMT. PORTS 



PORTS AUTHORITY 



/ 



25th Anniversary 



During the week of March 21, the Ports Au- 
thority will celebrate its 25th Anniversary. 

There will be an open house at Wilmington and 



Morehead City plus big doings in Raleigh accord- 
ing to J. Edgar Kirk, P. R. Director of the SPA. 
Keep tuned to your favorite news media for 
further details. 




Left to right: Sam Boatright, Roberto Cevada, 
Edmunson, James H. Felts, and Cipriano 
Gouzalez. 



FROM MEXICO- 

TOBACCO PEOPLE 



On September 16, 1969, representatives for 
Tabacos Mexicanos,* S.A. de C.V. from the state 
of Nayarit and the town of Tepic, Mexico visited 
Jim Edmunson at Morehead City. 



*Tobacos Mexicanos is an affiliate of the Austin Company. 
, NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 





A new and interesting photo of the phosphate shipping facilities at Morehead City — Top 
right shows new property of SPA, acquired from Bunge Corporation and announced in 
September. 



N. C. MOTOR CARRIERS- 



USE OF STATE PORTS 
QUADRUPLES IN NINE YEARS 

RALEIGH, N. C— Truck trailer use has quad- 
rupled at the Wilmington's N. C. State Port 
Terminal and tripled at Morehead City's -N. C. 
State Port Terminal since 1961 according to a 
state trucking official. 

J. T. Outlaw, executive vice president of the 
North Carolina Motor Carriers Association, re- 
leased the Wilmington and Morehead City truck 
trailer figures today. 

The State Port Terminal at Wilmington in- 
crease was 27, 634 truck-trailers in 1969 against 
6,327 truck-trailers in 1961. 

The Morehead City State Port Terminal used 
9,327 truck-trailers in 1969 against 3,091 in 1961. 

Last year's truck-trailer total of 36,961 for both 
State Ports Terminals almost quadrupled the 1961 
total of 9,4 18. 

"An outlook for the 1970 State Port Terminals' 
truck service seems optimistic and encouraging," 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Outlaw predicted. Although the overall truck ton- 
nage index is down more than 7% for the last 
three months, it is possible to anticipate some 
increase in tonnage volume in SENCland because 
of the expanded N. C. Port services and new in- 
dustries. 

These totals for truck trailer use do not include 
the thousands of trucks used at the Sunny Point 
Military Ocean Terminal of the U. S. Army Head- 
quarters located in Brunswick County, north of 
Southport. Tonnage for the calendar year of 1969 
was over one million measured tons, of which a 
considerable portion was hauled by truck-trailer. 
Sunny Point is under the command of Col. Robert 
D. Reid. 

Companies in the Wilmington area used thou- 
sands of truck-trailers through their individual 
company docks, in addition to the Wilmington 
State Ports terminal. These include: Almont Ship- 
ping Company, Swift & Co., International Paper. 
Ideal Cement, W. R. Grace & Co., Carolina Nitro- 
gen, Diamond Alkali, American Molasses Co., and 
Texas Gulf Sulphur Co.; the major petroleum 
companies of: American, Citco, Gulf, Humble. 
Phillips, Pure, Shell, Sinclair, Socony, Tenneco, 
Texaco Travelers and Hess. 

Some 160 major products were handled by 
truck-trailer through the ports. They include: 
from imports, cement, petroleum, fertilizer ma- 

i continued <>n page IT 



INTERCONFERENCE MEETING OF 
NORFOLK MARINE TERMINAL ASSOCIATION 

AND 
SOUTH ATLANTIC MARINE TERMINAL CONFERENCE 



H$$S" 


iPHi 










fit 




» *^ f " ' 1 


B 




K 1 ' 








Bil 


h»I- -. VB 








SKJM 








j^gU-jffi/ 




< / ^m?- 




■ olfc^H 




■m 


mm 











Mr. Harry C. Jackson, Traffic Director of the North Caro- 
lina State Ports Authority (Left), newly elected Vice- 
Chairman of the Joint Conference and Mr. Sam D. Adsit, 
Jr., (Right), Chairman of the Norfolk Marine Terminal 
Association, newly elected Chairman of the Conference. 

For the first time in history, representatives of 
the South Atlantic Marine Terminal Conference 
and the Norfolk Marine Terminal Association met 
at the Golden Triangle Motor Hotel, Norfolk, Va. 
on December 16, 1969 to discuss mutual problems 



that confront marine terminal operators in the 
fast-changing maritime industry. The effects of 
containerization on the movement of break bulk 
cargo was the principal topic of discussion, along 
with the common day-to-day problems of opera- 
tions that affect the Marine Terminal operators. 
The precedent set by this meeting by way of au- 
thorization of the Federal Maritime Commission 
permits the members of South Atlantic Marine 
Terminal Conference and Norfolk Marine Termi- 
nal Association, Acting by and through their 
associations, to "confer, discuss and make re- 
commendations on rates, charges, practices and 
other tariff matters and on matters of concern to 
the Marine Terminal Industry". For may years 
the mutual problems were beyond discussion by 
the various operators until an agreement was 
authorized recently by the F.M.C. 
Those attending the meeting were terminal op- 
erators from ports in the states of Virginia, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida 
with the N.M.T.A. serving as host. Pictured above 
are Messrs. Harry C. Jackson (left) of S.A.M.T.C. 
and S. D. Adsit, Jr. (right) of N.M.T.A., newly 
elected vice-chairman and chairman respectively. 
Mr. Ludwell H. Huxter of N.M.T.A. was elected 
secretary. 

Regular interconference meetings are planned for 
the future so that all members can be kept in- 
formed of developments in the industry. 



TRADE OPPORTUNITIES IN PORTUGAL FROM 
CASA DE PORTUGAL, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 



PROCEDEX 

Av. Julio Dinis, 10 — 3 C 

Lisboa — Portugal 



Letra C 



CANARIO, LUCAS & IRMAO, LDA 

Agueda 

Portugal 

CARVALHINHO & PERFEITO 
Goncalo — Portugal 

SULEI— SOC. ULTRAMARINA DE EM- 
PREENDIMENTOS IMOBILIARIOS 

(Divisao Industrial) 
P. 0. Box 2069 
Lisboa — Portugal 



-Wants to represent American firms 
interested in the Portuguese market 



-Hardware: — Building & Luggage Indus- 
try 



-Basketware 

-Tomato Paste 

Contact: Stephen E. Kelly 

Mgr. Industrial Dept. 

Raleigh, Chamber of Commerce. 

(see page 8 & 9) 
NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Go 
with 



WHAT TO WEAR: The type of casuals 
and sports clothes you would wear at a 
golf club or beach hotel suits shipboard 
life perfectly. You'll need summer 
clothing, but you'll probably want a 
sweater or two because nights at sea 
tend to be on the cool side. Bear in 
mind that nylon, dacron, and orlon 
blends are particularly good travelers. 

WARDROBE ETIQUETTE: There's no 
must about dressing for dinner, yet 
you may feel more festive, especially 
for the Captain's galas, if you don din- 
ner attire. It is never customary to 
"dress" on the first or last night out, 
on Sunday evenings, or at the end of 
a full day in port. Women do not ap- 
pear in the Dining Room in short 
shorts, and during the day they wear 
sweaters or jackets over halter tops. 
Men wear jackets in the Dining Room, 
and do not appear after cocktail hour 
sans ties. For sight-seeing: women do 



not appear on the street in shorts, 
slacks, or low-neck dresses; nor do men 
go about in shorts or without jackets. 

WHAT TO PACK: Soaps, detergents 
and laundry gadgets for articles you 
may wish to rinse out yourself; camera 
equipment; sun glasses; prescribed 
medicine and vitamin pills; binoculars; 
travel clock; manicure set; sewing kit; 
cigarette lighter; notebook for what 
you see and buy on shore, and for ad- 
dresses of friends you'll make en route; 
suntan lotion. 

Don't worry about a few personal items 
you may forget to bring along as the 
Tradewinds Gift Shop aboard ship 
stocks a wide range of personal things 
as well as a fine selection of gifts, many 
of which may be purchased at duty- 
free prices. 

PURCHASE ALLOWANCE: Eachmem- 
ber of a family, resident in the U.S., 
may bring into the U.S., duty free, 
S100 worth of purchases made en route, 
including 100 cigars. One quart of al- 
coholic beverages may be included in 
the duty free allowance for each per- 
son over 21 years of age. Purchases of 
many items may be made at a total 
cost considerably below prices in the 
U.S. even when you combine the pur- 
chase price in Caribbean ports with 



the applicable U.S. Customs duty. 
Consult Purser for duty on purchases 
over and above your duty free allow- 
ance, and for information on restricted 
items such as fruits, plants and pets. 

BAGGAGE : Each piece should be plain- 
ly marked with the tags supplied with 
your ticket. In checking luggage through 
to New York and pier, make a note of 
check numbers and routing — helpful 
if check is lost. Baggage will be ac- 
cepted on the pier any day during the 
week of sailing. Cameras and articles 
of foreign make to Ik- taken on board 
should be registered with the Customs 
Office on the pier before sailing, in or- 
der to avoid complications with Cus- 
toms upon return to the U.S. Should 
you plan to use air transportation to 
the port of embarkation it is recom- 
mended that you investigate the ad- 
vantages of the newly liberalized do- 
mestic airline policy on baggage. 

INSURANCE: It is recommended that 
travelers take out a floater policy on 
baggage through their agent or a Grace 
Line representative. For complete cov- 
erage the policy should extend from 
date of departure from home to two or 
three days after return, for protection 
in case of unforeseen delay. 



S. S. SANTA PAULA-TO SAIL FROM MOREHEAD 



Originally scheduled to sail from Morehead City on April 4th at the request of the North 
Carolina Academy of General Practice. We expect that there will be about 50 doctors 
and their wives from this organization and sister organizations in South Carolina and 
Virginia sailing on this cruise. 

GRACE LINE INC. 
Paul H. Best 
Regional Manager 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




Portuguese Sailfreighters 



USBOAt City of Contrasts 



"Roaming the Seven Seas 
with Betty Casey" 

Long before the present surge of 
popularity for folk-singing now 
sweeping the United States began, 
the nostalgic strains of ballads, 
called "fado", sung to the accom- 
paniment of a special Portuguese 
guitar were popular entertainment 
in Lisbon (called Lisboa in Portu- 
guese.) "Fado" singers and brightly 
costumed folk-dancers still entertain 
hometowners and the many tourists 
who make their way to this scenic 
city of pastel colored buildings built 
on seven terraced hills. 

Lisbon, with its million inhabi- 
tants, is Europe's western-most 
Capital and an important commer- 
cial and tourist center. World fa- 
mous modern resorts beckon from 
nearby sunny Estoril, Cascais, Costa 
da Caparaca, Sintra and Portinho 
da Arrabida. 

The city's seaport, spread along 
the right bank of the Tagus river 
estuary where the wide Lisbon Bay 
narrows to a channel leading to the 
Atlantic Ocean, is one of the Conti- 
nents best natural, sheltered harbors. 
Large liners and cargo vessels from 
the world over bypass a sand bar in 
the mouth of the Tagus to tie up at 








Nineteenth Century Portuguese Gal- 
leon 



Pictures courtesy of the Lis- 
bon and Portuguese Propa- 
ganda and tourism depart- 
ment. 



modern docks along the five mile 
long waterfront and to find anchor- 
age in Lisbon Bay. The port boasts 
the largest suspension bridge in 
Europe. 

The small country of Portugal, 
with almost nine million inhabitants, 
is a Corporative Republic and has an 
area of more than thirty-five-and-a- 
half thousand square miles includ- 
ing the Azores and Madeira. It lies 
along the western section of the 
Iberian Peninsula which it shares 
with Spain. A 500 mile long sunny, 
sandy coastline along the Atlantic 
Ocean is marked with occasional 
lagoons and rocky bays interspersed 
with popular beach resorts and 
white washed fishing villages. 

Most of the inland and eastern 
part is rugged mountainous terrain 
of scenic beauty crossed by gushing 
rivers in deep gorges. The Tagus 
river divides the country into north 
and south parts. The arid south is 
noted for its earthquakes. All in all, 
however, the climate is mild and 
pleasant and winters are not severe. 

Wooded slopes of the interior fur- 
nish Portugal's leading export, cork, 
for which it is the world's largest 
producer. The United States re- 
ceives 75% of this production. Other 
leading exports are timber, chest- 
nuts, fine wines — port, madeira, 
sparkling, muscatel, and claret — as 
well as brandy. Exports and imports 
rose during 1968 following new 
financial measures introduced by the 
Minister of Finance. 

About 60% of the hardy and vig- 
orous Portuguese people are en- 
gaged in agriculture which regis- 
tered an increase in output in 1968 
after government loans were used 
to purchase modern agricultural 
machinery and equipment. Some of 
the crops are olives, cereals and 
fruits. Fisheries and canneries for 
sardines and tuna provide an im- 
portant produce for foreign trade. 

Portugal is rich in all kinds of 
minerals, although only tungsten, 
pyrites and cassiterite are mined to 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



"<*?•«£> 




Overlooking the Old City and the Tagus from "Miradouro de Santo Luzia" 



any extent. Other industries and 
exports include the manufacture of 
woolen textiles, silken goods, cotton 
fabrics, chinaware, ceramics and 
precious stones. 

While the first permanent settle- 
ment on the Tagus dates from Phoe- 
nician times and Caesar established 
it as a municipality, Lisbon's true 
importance dates from 1147 when 
Alfonso I recaptured it from the 
Moors with the help of the Cru- 
saders. Prosperity came with the 
establishment of the Portuguese 
Empire in Agrica and India in the 
16th Century. During that historic- 
time Portuguese ships and sailors 
discovered and explored two-thirds 
of the earth. Their revolutionary 
"caravels", light, swift, sailing ships 
with a high poop, were designed 
and built there under the supervi- 
sion of Prince Heniy, the navigator. 
From Belem, a few miles down- 
stream from the city center, Bartolo- 
meu Dias, Vasco da Gama, Pedro 
Alvares Cabral and other heroes of 
the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries 
set out on their great voyages of 
discovery and returned triumphant 
to the same shores. 

Portuguese colonies, since 1951 
called "Overseas Provinces" include 
Portuguese India (under Indian 
military occupation since 1961); 
Macao and part of Timor in Asia; 
Cape Verde Islands in the Atlantic; 
Portuguese Guinea, Sao Tome and 
Principe Islands; Angola in Portu- 
guese West Africa and Mozambique 
in Portuguese East Africa. 

Although Romans stamped the 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



country with a language of Latin 
origin, the original Portuguese stock 
has received transfusions of blood 
from many races: Romans, Goths, 
Abrabs and Berbers, settlers from 
Northern Europe, Jews and Ne- 
groes. Portuguese is mother tongue 
of 100 million people, the sixth most 
used language in the world and is 
spoken in Brazil as well as Portugal 
and its overseas provinces. 

In 1968, Premier Caetano suc- 
ceeded Salazar who had served in 
that office for 36 years. Some politi- 
cal unrest followed but economic 
development showed some improve- 
ment. 

A great variety of picturesque 
costumes are worn by the peasantry, 
especially during pilgrimages or on 
holidays, but in the cities most peo- 
ple wear western clothes. Dancing 
and singing play an important part 
in the lives of the people. Bands 
made up of "gaitas", or bagpipes, 
fiddles, drums, accordions and Por- 
tuguese guitars furnish gay music 
for festivals and parades. Many of 
these are held in connection with 
religious celebrations for the pre- 
dominately Catholic populace. Soc- 
cer and bull-fighting, in which the 
bull is not killed, are the most popu- 
lar sports. 

From its setting upon seven hills, 
Lisbon has colorfully contrasted 
buildings of modern hotels, office 
buildings, and stores along broad 
avenues lined with trees, as com- 
pared to ancient, quaint houses 
painted pastel colors with red tile 
tops clustered over narrow winding 



alleys — each house in itself a veran- 
da overlooking the wide estuary of 
the Tagus. In one part of the old 
city a lane between buildings is so 
narrow that a popular poet, Frederi- 
co de Brito has written: 

Your house is so close to mine 
in the starry night's bliss 
To exchange a tender kiss 
Our lips easily meet 
High across the narrow street. 
Portugal was an ally of the United 
States in World War I and remained 
neutral in World War II, although 
it leased Azores air bases to the 
U.S. and England. She presently is 
an ally of the United States' in 
NATO and a member of the United 
Nations, the European Free Trade 
Association and other international 
bodies. Portugal has always stood 
for peace and progress in the inter- 
national community. 

By sea, Portugal's Companhia 
Colonial de Navegacao links Lisbon 
with Port Everglades in Florida 
and the Greek Line, the Italian Line. 
American Export Line and occasion- 
ally Zim Lines and Chandris Lines 
connect Lisbon with New York, Car- 
regadores Acoreanos. a steamship 
company which operates freighters, 
can carry 12 passengers twice a 
month from New York to Lisbon. 
Portugal, with its sunshine and 
blue sky; mountains and sea-shore; 
stirring history and modern day 
developments; mixture of ancient 
and todays architecture, customs 
and culture, extends a warm wel- 
come to visitors to its friendly shores. 



Historic Bath: North Carolina's Oldest 
Incorporated Town 



DOWN THE 
HISTORYLAND 
TRAIL 



Elizabeth W. Wilborn 

Field Services Researcher 

Division of Historic Sites and Museums 

State Department of Archives and History 




Palmer-Marsh House, Historic Bath State Historic Site 





The Kitchen in the Palmer-Marsh House 
10 



Double chimney of the Palmer Marsh House 

Bath Town pre-dates English colonization, for 
at one time Indian villages and town sites dotted 
the banks of the Pamlico River; today the Texas 
Gulf Sulphur mining operation is the most pro- 
minent feature of the area. By an act of the as- 
sembly on March 8, 1705, Bath became the first 
incorporated town of the colony, later the State 
of North Carolina. Three governors, during the 
Proprietary period, made Bath the seat of govern- 
ment — Robert Daniel, Thomas Cary, and Charles 
Eden. The Assembly met in Bath from 1744 to 
1752 and the Lower House of the Assembly, in 
1746, made Bath the first permanent capital of 
North Carolina — though this bill was never rati- 
fied. 

Bath served as a center of refuge for the settlers 

, NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




A view of the Bonner 
House from the .Mem- 
orial garden 



during the Tuscarora Indian War (1711-1713). 
It was later a haven for the notorious pirate 
"Blackbeard," or Edward Teach. For approxi- 
mately a year the pirate made Bath his home — and 
some of its most prominent citizens, his accom- 
plices. Stories of treasure buried by the buccaneer 
have persisted to the present time, with many 
disappointed treasure-seekers, for no one has ever 
reported finding his booty. 

St. Thomas Parish, established by the Vestry 
Act of 1701, was selected by Dr. Thomas Bray, 
founder of the Society for the Propagation of the 
Gospel in Foreign Parts, to receive a library. Bray 
was instrumental also, through the Society, in 
sending missionaries to the parish — three of whom 
made their homes in Bath. The building of St. 
Thomas Church was begun about 1734; today it 
is the oldest church in the state in continuous use. 
The George II candelabra and the Queen Anne 
Bell are among the more interesting items con- 
nected with St. Thomas Church. The bell, pur- 
chased many years after Queen Anne's death, was 
bought with monies from a foundation, established 
by the Queen, which is still funding charitable 
causes. The church has been restored and is open 
to the public. 

The State Department of Archives and History 
operates Historic Bath — including two historic 
houses. The Palmer-Marsh House, built about 
1760, is noted for its double chimney. Believed to 
have been built by Michael Coutanch, it was ac- 
quired by Colonel Robert Palmer in 1764. When 
Claude Joseph Sauthier, mapmaker for the British 
crown, drew his map of Bath in 1769, the most 
outstanding dwelling was that of "Col. Palmer." 
The house remained in the Palmer family until 
the turn of the century; in 1802 the Marsh broth- 
ers, Daniel and Jonathan, bought the property. 
The house has been restored and furnished and 
opened to the public. Here, as is true elsewhere 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 




Dining room of the Bonner House with mid to late 19th 
century ship's dining table-Atop is a rare pair of Canton 
cider jugs. 

in Bath, one sees the work of the Historic Bath 
Commission, which has been instrumental in pre- 
serving Bath. 

The Bonner House, with a memorial garden and 
dependencies, is also open to visitors. The Oscar 
F. Smith Memorial Foundation played a large 
role in acquiring and restoring this property. The 
property was owned by the Bonner family from 
1830 until it became a part of Historic Bath. 

Bath, once a port town, sits quitely amid the 
surrounding water — Bath ('reck and Adam's 
Creek emptying into the Pamlico are on two sides 
of the town. There is little today to remind one of 
the bloody Tuscarora, but there is much to see. 
enjoy, and meditate upon. 

n 



NOVEMBER NORTH CAROLINA WORLD TRADE ASSOCIATION 
MEETS IN CHARLOTTE ELECTS NEW BOARD AND OFFICERS 



NOVEMBER, 1969 

SIXTH ANNUAL NCWTA MEETING A SUCCESS! 

On November 6th and 7th, NCWTA members and 
guests met in Charlotte for a most successful and in- 
formative meeting. Representatives from eleven foreign 
consulates and embassies gave reports on trade pros- 
pects abroad, and banquet speaker, Mr. R. McLellan, 
Deputy Asst. Secretary of Commerce, explained the 
U. S. position in world trade. A report on the recent 
N. C Far East Trade Mission was presented by several 
Mission members. Also in attendance were the North 
Carolina and South Carolina Regional Export Expan- 
sion Council members. 

New NCWTA officers and directors for 1970 were 
elected as follows: 



NEW BOARD MEETS 
IN WINSTON-SALEM 





ufljfek — y^ BT". ^^U 




Left to right: Hans Mittemeijer, Leonard 
Bauer, Joel New, Ernest Plumb, and John 
Votta. 



President — Chairman of the Board 

John Votta, President 

Votam International Company 

Charlotte 

First Vice-President 

William Troxler, President 

Troxler Electronic Laboratories, Inc. 

Raleigh 

Second Vice-President 

Kenneth Thomas, President 

Gravely Corporation 

Clemmons 

Secretanj-Treasurer 

Ernest Plumb, Asst. Treasurer 

Whitin International Ltd. 

Charlotte 

Directors for 1970: Richard E. Barker, Dr. Jack N. 
Behrman, Anthony B. Brannock, L. C. Bruce, Larry 
Carter, Carl Dawson, James H. Fryar, C. R. Harris, 
Eugene E. Humphries, Sr., Paul Linney, Hans Mit- 
temeijer, O. S. Moore, H. Banks Newman, Anthony 
Winkler-Prins, Bruce Smith, Arthur Brown, Thatcher 
Townsend, Clem Schrader, Adrian Shufford, Frank 
Fishburn, John Palmer, Robert Sickels, James Loftus, 
Morris Speizman, Robert Barker, Doug Ponischil, 
Jurgen Meyer-Cuno, Leonard Bauer. 
Assistant Directors: Joel New, Edgar Kirk 

Committees for International Conference in 
Raleigh Oct. 1, 2 include chairman of Public 
Relations L. C. Bruce, Raleigh, with Leonard 
Bauer of Pisgah, Robert Baker of Charlotte, 
Hans Mittemeijer of Winston-Salem and Richard 
Barker of Wilmington. 



PIQUET IN RALEIGH SAYS 

ONE YEAR AGO- work on the 

ailment not the symptom 



Howard S. Piquet, a native 
of New York, is Senior Spe- 
cialist in International Eco- 
nomics, Legislative Reference 
service with the Library of 
Congress. In this position, 
which he has held since 1956, 
he serves as advisor to Con- 
gressional Committees and to 
members of both houses of 
Congress. 

Dr. Piquet is a graduate of 
New York University and 
holds an M.A. degree from 
the University of California 
and a Ph.D. from Princeton 
University. He has taught at 
Princeton and New York Uni- 
versities and at the Universi- 
ties of Oregon and Washington. 

He has served with the U.S. Tariff Commission, the 
U.N. Interim Commission on Food and Agriculture and 
with the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion. 
He has also authored numerous articles in the field of 
international trade. 
12 




HOWARD S. PIQUET 



It is typical of our disposition, with respect to 
economic problems, to concentrade on the symp- 
toms of ailments, rather than on the ailments them- 
selves, that one of the most important aspects of 
all of balance-of-payments disequilibrium has at- 
tracted little attention, namely, foreign trade 
policy. 

This is not to say that the narrowing excess of 
exports over imports has not attracted attention, 
for it has. But that attention has been confined 
to deploring the fact that the "favorable" trade 
balance has been narrowing and to insisting that 
exports should be increased relative to' import. 
Indeed, this narrowing is providing a convenient 
vehicle with which to propagandize for intensified 
trade restrictions. Already we are being told that 
a comprehensive system of import quotas is neces- 
sary to help eliminate the balance-of-payments 
deficit. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



U.S. TRADE AND BALANCE-OF-PAYMENTS PROBLEMS: 
IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DOMESTIC ECONOMY 

by Howard S. Piquet 



The truth lies in exactly the opposite direction. 
Liberal international trade policies are not merely 
not inconsistent with solution of the balance-of- 
payments problem; they are essential to it. 

What are really inconsistent with a solution of 
the balance-of-payments problem are the efforts 
to bring about equilibrium in the international 
accounts by such direct means as our halting the 
outflow of private capital and restricting foreign 
travel by Americans. 

These efforts are not only mis-directed but, if 
implemented with vigor, can only aggravate in- 
ternational disequilibrium. The excess of the out- 
flow of funds over their inflow from abroad is a 
symptom of economic disorder and should not be 
confused with the disorder itself. Application of 
such direct measures to eliminate the balance-of- 
payments deficit is comparable to trying to cool a 
room by holding a piece of ice under the thermo- 
stat. The room will only get hotter the balance-of- 
payments deficit will widen. We need to concen- 
trate on the malady itself and not on its symp- 
toms. 

The malady is not the statistical "deficit" in the 
international accounts, but the absence of a self- 
equilibrating mechanism to stabilize outflows and 
inflows of funds among the economically-devel- 
oped countries. Governmental restriction of the 
outflow of private capital and of foreign travel 
have the same kind of contractive effect on the 
international accounts as across-the-board restric- 
tion of merchandise imports. 

The persistent deficits in the international ac- 
counts of the United States have been caused by: 
(1) the fact that other countries have chosen to use 
dollars as an important part of their monetary 
reserves, (2) failure of the U.S. Government to 
maintain the purchasing power of the dollar, and 
(3) unwillingness on the part of the United States 
and other industrialized countries to allow their 
economies to adapt to each other through private 
commercial transactions. 

The use of dollars as monetary reserves will 
continue as long as other countries are willing 
to hold them in preference to using them to pur- 
chase American merchandise or to coverting them 
into gold. At what point it will no longer be feasi- 
ble for them to use dollars as monetary reserves 
is largely a psychological question. 

The substitution of something else for dollars 
as international monetaiy reserves can best be 
brought about by international agreement. Such 
agreement does not depend upon prior elimination 
by the United States of its balance-of-payments 
deficit, notwithstanding assertions to that effect 
by certain foreign politicians and bankers. 

Governments are prone to blame monopoly — 
both industrial and labor — for inflationary price 



rises, while hiding the fact that they themselves 
are the real culprits. The prime cause of inflation 
is the over-issuance of credit by governments and 
central banks. The balance-of-payments deficit of 
the United States will persist as long as the Fed- 
eral Reserve maintains interest rates at levels 
lower than are necessary to equate the demand for 
investment capital with the supply of savings by 
the public. However, even is inflation were held 
in check and a new international monetary unit 
were agreed upon, there would still be deficits in 
the international accounts as long as there is un- 
willingness to allow national economies to adjust 
to each other through the free international move- 
ment of merchandise and capital. 

There is danger in allowing the balance-of-pay- 
ments deficit to become a statistical strait-jacket, 
causing us to adopt policies that are antithetical 
to the best interest of the United States. Most of 
the autonomous items in the balance of payments 
are inter-connected, and it is futile to try to bring 
about self-sustaining equilibrium by applying re- 
strictionist devices designed to increase the in- 
flow, or decrease the outflow, of funds by direct 
means. 

For this reason, programs designed to restrict 
U.S. private direct investment abroad and to limit 
foreign travel by Americans are self-defeating. 
Direct U.S. private investments abroad have al- 
ready reached $55 billion and the annual dividend 
return on them is much greater than the annual 
outflow of new capital. (In 1967 Americans sent 
$ 3.0 billion of new direct investment capital 
abroad and received dividends, royalties, etc. of 
$7.9 billion in return on existing investments, only 
partially offset by the payment to foreigners of 
$ 2.3 billion on their investments in the United 
States). To restrict the outflow of private invest- 
ment capital is to cripple the goose that lays the 
golden eggs. 

Similarly, curtailment of foreign travel by 
Americans will be largely offset by a falling off 
in the foreign demand for American aircraft equip- 
ment and by retaliation on the part of foreign 
enterprises that derive much of their income from 
American tourists. 



For 22 years, prior to his leaving the Government Service 
on January 1. 1969 Dr. Piquet was the Senior Specialist 
in International Economics of the Legislative Reference 
Service of the Library of Congress. Prior to that he was 
Executive Secretary of the Interim Commission on Food 
and Agriculture (FAO) of the United Nations and Chief 
of the Economics Division of the U.S. Tariff Commission. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE POUTS 



1 1 




SOUTHERN 



CORPORATION 



FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 
CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 
F.M.C. NO. 469 



P. 0. BOX 3745 . WILMINGTON, N. C. 28401 
PHONES: (IMPORT) 919-762-9655 
(EXPORT) 919-762-9651 
TWX 510-937-0311 . CABLE "SOUTHOVER" 



WILMINGTON 
NORTH CAROLINA 



MOREHEAD GITY 
NORTH CAROLINA 

(919)726-6825 



CHARLOTTE 
NORTH CAROLINA 

(704)392-8161 



BATON ROUGE 
LOUISIANA 

(504)343-9545 



NORFOLK 
VIRGINIA 

(903)623-3717 



PROVISIONS, 

DECK AND ENGINEER'S SUPPLIES 

BONDED CIGARETTE WHSE. 

0. E. DuRANT 



SHIP CHANDLER 



Representative of 



Columbia Rope 
International Paint 
Mobile Oil Co., Inc. 



Wilmington, N. C. 
Telephone RO 2-4232 
Water & Market Sts. 



LITH0 INDUSTRIES, 
INCORPORATED 



P. O. Box 12462 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



Serving North Carolina For 
All Her Printing Needs 




Telephone (919)782-1314 
782-1315 

PRINTING 

PUBLICATIONS 

CASEBOOK 

MANUFACTURING 



MAERSK LINE 

Far East 
Cargo Services 

Frequent Sailings from Morehead City to 

Manila, Bangkok, Saigon, Hong Kong, 

Singapore, Indonesia 




HEIDE COMPANY 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

P.O. Drawer E 

Telephone (919) 726-5080 

MOLLER STEAMSHIP COMPANY, INC., General Agents 

67 Brood Street, New York 4, N. Y. 



Heide Company 

A Division of Luckenbach Steamship Co. Inc. 

WILMINGTON 

& 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS ■ STEVEDORES 

INTERNATIONAL 
FREIGHT FORWARDERS FMC NO. 69 



WILMINGTON, N.C 

North Carolina Maritime Bldg. Tel: (919) 763-8271 
RICHARD BARKER, Vice-President, Luckenbach 

Steamship Co., Inc. 
W. MURLE TEACHEY, Assistant General Manager 
E. MAYO HOLMES, Treasurer 
A. P. BLAND, Operations Manager 
P. C. WEST, Export Manager 
JACK C. JOYNER, Traffic Representative 
WILLIAM A. SUMMERLIN, Traffic Representative 
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. 
P.O. Drawer E. Tel: (919) 726-2511 
JACK TILLEY, Manager 
CARL ROWE, Assistant to the Manager 
KENNETH SKINNER, Operations 



I l 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



We'll go the extra mile 

for your international 

banking business. 



We'll go wherever you need us. To Paris, 
London, Nairobi and all around the world. 
We'll obtain foreign monies and write letters 
of introduction to foreign banks for you. 
We'll locate foreign suppliers for your busi- 
ness and issue commercial letters of credit. 
We'll help you arrange licensing of your 



products in foreign markets. We'll be your 
international business partner. Just call us in 
the International Department at area code 
704/372-3456. Or write us at Post Office 
Box 1 0794 Charlotte, North Carolina28201. 



First Union National *J 




NORTH CAROLINA STATE FORTS 



15 



barber 




Specialists in Handling Tobacco 

Regular Sailings From 
North Carolina Ports 

TO 

MANILA, HONG KONG, 

BANGKOK, SINGAPORE, 

DJAKARTA AND 

JAPANESE PORTS 

with 
NEW FAST VESSELS 



barber 



STEAMSHIP LINES, INC. 

Agents 1 7 Battery Place. New York, N.Y. 1 0004 Tel: 1212) 944-1300 

Cleveland— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., Illuminating Bldg. 
Chicago— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 333 N. Michigan Ave. 
Detroit— Tri-Coast Shipping Co., 1814 First Federal Bldg. 

Agent: Moreheod City and Wilmington, N. C. 

WATERS SHIPPING CO., INC. 



WS3 W,TH 

CARTERET . . . 




. . . along the south atlantic a tow with 
CARTERET is a tradition of confidence 
—where only the best serves you . . . 

CARTERET TOWING CO., INC. 

Radio Island 
Moreheod City, N. C. 
Charles Piner & Teen Piner PA 6-5440 

Operators 



AT ITS BEST ! 

New Hanover County, N. C. 

Year 'round mild climate. Churches, Schools, 
Theatres. Every recreation for happy workers. 

1. Land-Sea-Air Transportation Facilities 

2. Ample Housing — Quality Labor Supply 

3. N. C. Largest Shipping Port 

For detailed Industrial Information — 
Write: 

County Commissioners — Commission Office 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



CUSTOMHOUSE BROKERS 

Telephone-919-763-8494 Teletype-510-937-0312 

WATERFRONT SERVICES, INC. 

2907 Burnett Blvd. 
Wilmington, North Carolina 



MOREHEAD CITY LINE HANDLING 
COMPANY, INC. 

Waterfront Service 

A. T. PINER 

MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 

Phones: Day 726-5440 Night: 726-5549 

Post Office Drawer 185 



L6 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



I 



■I 



AT 



' PRESS TIME 



News Release— SEACOR 
SEACOR, INC., port developers, terminal 
operators and transportation specialists of 
Wilmington, N.C., in a recent corporate re- 
organization, acquired two company subsid- 
iaries, ALMONT SHIPPING COMPANY, 
INC., and EAST COAST TERMINALS, 
INC. W. S. R. Beane, Board Chairman, an- 
nounced the move as part of a long range 
development program to place SEACOR and 
the Wilmington port in the forefront of dry 
and liquid bulk snipping on the Eastern Sea- 
board. Ernest Ball, President, explained fur- 
ther that SEACOR is gearing up for the 
growth expected in the Southeast in the last 
quarter of this century. ALMONT SHIP- 
PING COMPANY, INC., is a stevedoring, 



N. C. Motor Carriers (cont. from page 5) 

terials, caustic soda, tobacco, liquors, lumber, 
steel, asphalt, processed meat, jute, burlap, bag- 
ging, fiber, iron and plywood — For exports, lum- 
ber, blankets, hose, underwear, auto batteries, 
furniture, fertilizer, textile machinery, leaf tobacco, 
poultry, manufactured tobacco, fabricated steel 
products, minerals, wood pulp, dairy products, 
boilers and parts, lineboard, dry milk, nitrate 
paperboard, scrap metal, asphalt, petroleum and 
glycol. 

It would be well to remember in rounding out 




Wi/mingfon 
Shipping Company 



jddsMa 



am 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

& 

STEVEDORES 

North Carolina Maritime Building 

State Port Terminal 

Wilmington, North Carolina 

P. O. Box 1H09 (able Address 

Phone 763-7333 WILSHIPCO 

TWX NO. 510 937-0311 
Branch Offices: Morehead City Shipping Co. 

P. O. Box 270N6 
Charlotte, N. C. 2S20.H Morehead City, N. C. 



terminaling and transportation operation 
providing one of the largest bulk terminaling 
facilities on the Atlantic Coast, with piers on 
the North Cape Fear River in Wilmington. 
EAST COAST TERMINALS, INC., is a bulk 
cargo storage and transfer facility which was 
recently selected as the site for the largest 
imported fishmeal storage and pasteurization 
processing plant on the East Coast. EAST 
COAST TERMINALS, INC., is also located 
on the Northeast Cape Fear River, north of 
Wilmington. In addition to improving the 
capability of its existing port operations, 
SEACOR plans to develop additional deep- 
water land tracts for use by port related 
industries. 






the truck-trailer usage, that the totals above do 
not include the thousands of truck-trailers used 
to supply jet fuel to Camp Lejeune, Cherry Point, 
and Seymour Johnson Field from terminals at 
Radio Island, Beaufort, N. C. Nor do they include 
the barge petroleum traffic handled on the Cape 
Fear River through the River Terminal at Fay- 
etteville, where thousands of truck-trailers are 
used annually in the area. 

Jeff B.Wilson 



Marine Insurance 
Since 1878 



EXPORT SERVICES 

• NEGOTIABLE INSURANCE CERTIFICATES 
ISSUED FOR ALL TRADES 

• WORLD-WIDE SETTLING AGENTS 

• FOREIGN CREDIT AND POLITICAL RISKS 
INSURED 



IMPORT SERVICES 

• DOCKSIDE CLAIM FACILITIES 

• GENERAL AVERAGE GUARANTEES 

• DAMAGE PREVENTION ADVICES 



Walker Taylor Agency 

P. O. BOX 897 • WILMINGTON, N. C 



WALKER TAYLOR 



JOHN METTS 



EXPORTUNITIES 



for 
INCREASED SALES AND PROFITS 

BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON 

Cameroon — Ten tons colored and white cotton cloth 
for cleaning and dusting purposes prepared in 50 kilo 
compressed and covered bales. No synthetic material, 
hinges or ornaments; exelusing blankets, linings. 

LOGGING CAMPS, LOGGING CONTRACTORS 

Itah/ — Logs of Douglas fir, hemlock, other types of 
timber. 

FOOTWEAR EXCEPT RUBBER 
Australia — Men's dress shoes, made of leather; exclusive 
styles preferred. 
FARM MACHINERY 

Australia — Horticultural and agricultural equipment. 
METALWORKING MACHINERY 
Portugal — Chain saws; chains and cutting blades. 
MACHINERY 

Portugal — Hydraulic hoists for use with truck bodies. 
ELECTRIC LIGHTING, WIRING EQUIPMENT 
Australia — Pole line hardware; specifically tapered alu- 
minum lighting columns for street lights. 
BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON 
Switzerland — Cotton plain dyed, printed, finished fab- 
rics, apparel, toweling, bedsheet, pillowcase fabrics, 
jacquard woven cotton fabrics, plain, printed, colored. 
YARN, THREAD MILLS, PRODUCTS 
Lebanon — Textured, crimpted, or bulked filament 
yarns. 

PAPERBOARD MILLS, PRODUCTS 
Hong Kong — Paperboard for making boxes. 
SYNTHETIC MATERIALS 

Itahj — Plastic materials, synthetic resins, nonvulcaniza- 
ble elastomers; synthetic rubber; synthetic organic 
fibers. 



Joel B. New 

I . S. Dept. of Commerce 

P. O. Box 1950, Boom 40S 



Post Office B!<1«. 
Greensboro, N. (. 

(919) 275-9111 



DRUGS 

New Zealand — Pharmaceutical preparations. 
ELECTRIC LIGHTING, WIRING EQUIPMENT 

Sweden — Connectors, all kinds. 
FIELD CROP FARMS 

Netherlands — Peas, beans, similar agricultural com- 
modities. 

DAIRY PRODUCTS 

Cyprus — Concentrated milk, shipped in bulk (barrels, 

drums, and tanks ). 

BROAD WOVEN FABRIC MILLS, COTTON 

Canada— 100% cotton corduroy and/or corduroy of 
cotton/polvester blend with permanent press finish, 
for purchase in quantities of 10,000 yd. lots or higher. 
TEXTILE GOODS 

Germany — New cotton remnants for manufacture of 
polishing discs. 

RADIO, TELEVISION RECEIVING SETS 
Netherlands — Complete range of radio receivers, in- 
cluding portable, automobile, home, etc. 
AGRICULTURAL CHEMICALS 
France — Fertilizers of good quality, primarily products 
suitable for fruit-trees grown in orchards in southwest 
France. 

FARM MACHINERY 

France — Farm machinery equipment: sprayers (power 
and speed ), other categories of light — and medium- 
duty machines, attachments designed for preparing 
vegetable and fruit crops for shipment to wholesale 
markets. 



"COMMERCE NOTES" 

Greensboro Field Office 



EXPORT DOCUMENTATION 
STREAMLINED 

1. Effective October 1, exporters are no longer 
required to file shipper's export declarations for 
general license shipments to Free World countries 
when the shipments are valued at less that $250. 

2. Effective November 1, high volume exporters 



meeting requirements of the Office of Export 
Control and Bureau of the Census have the option 
of filing monthly export declarations rather than 
separate export declarations for each shipment to 
Free World countries. 



18 



NOBTH CABOLINA STATE PORTS 



Honored in England 



Through a smashing arrangement with one of 
England's largest banks, BankAmcricard is 
honored for traveling, shopping and entertaining 
throughout Great Britain. 

By the same token, England's Barclaycard is 
honored here. 



So now Barclaycard and BankAmcricard holders 
can charge almost anything, from tote-bags to bed 
and breakfast, at thousands of businesses on 
both sides of the ocean. 

And that's a bit of all right. 

©BankAmerica Service Corporation 1958, 1967 

©Servicemarks owned and licensed by BankAmerica Service Corporation 





STATE PORT TERMINAL 

WILMINGTON 




YUu-i 



W. H. Fricderichs, Operations Manager 



DRY CARGO WHARF: 3,695 feet of continuous mar- 
ginal concrete wharf with wide aprons. 34 feet of 
water alongside at mean low water (channel pro- 
ject now being deepened to 38 feet) capable of 
working seven vessels simultaneously. Additional 
1,045 ft. of wharf in 1969. 

TANKER RERTH: T-head type with mooring dol- 
phins, supported by tank farm and available unde- 
veloped area. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Four fully-sprinklered, modern, 
concrete, steel, and masonry buildings total 506,000 
square feet. 

OPEN RERTH: 800 continuous feet, as well as other 
open areas between sheds and at ends of wharf, 
backed up by 15 acres of paved open storage access- 
ible by rail or truck. 

WAREHOUSES: 522,962 square feet, fully sprink- 
lered. RONDED WAREHOUSE space available 
bv arrangement with management. 

CARGO STORAGE SHELTER: 273,000 square feet, 
open ends, concrete and steel, paved building, 
equipped with overhead bridge cranes and served 
by truck and rail access to all parts. 

U. S. CUSTOMS SERVICES: All services for the 
Port of Wilmington, including Classification and 
Value Section, located on terminal property. 

SCALES: Two truck scales and one railroad car scale 
conveniently located on terminal. Certified weigh- 
masters on 24-hour duty. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossovers 
along full length of wharf apron. Depressed tracks 
serving rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Stor- 
age yard capacity — 370 rail cars. (Four diesel 
switching engines operated by the terminal.) 

HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Two 45-ton capacity gantry 
cranes equipped for 80-inch magnet and two or six 
yard bucket operations. A 75-ton gantry crane (at 
70 ft. radius ) can be used in tandem with either of 
the 45-ton cranes for lifts up to 120 tons. The larger 
crane is speedily convertible for fast single line lifts, 
magnet or bucket, as well as container cargo opera- 
tions. 



CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Forklifts of var- 
ious capacities with accessories — cotton and paper 
clamps, etc., tractors, cargo trailers, 5-ton mobile 
crane, stevedore-tvpe cargo pallets. 

LOADING & UNLOADING: Direct discharge or 
loading between ships tackle and open top railcars 
possible bv prior arrangement. Rail and truck docks 
for loading and unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; ramps for easy access into sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Modern fumigation plant with two 
large vacuum chambers. 

SERVICES: Seaboard Coast Line Railroad Company 
plus numerous highway motor carriers. Locally 
domiciled Stevedoring Companies, Ships Agents, 
Customs Rrokers, and Freight Forwarders. 



SOUTHPORT 

NORTH CAROLINA 
ON INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY 

BOAT HARBOR 



Complete Modern Boating Facilities 
In a Picturesque & Historical Town 





Charles McNeill, Operations Manager 



STATE PORT TERMINAL 

MOREHEAD CITY 



SHIPSIDE SITES: Including existing rental buildings 
available to private enterprise for specialized pur- 
poses. 

WHARF: Concrete and steel, 3,625 feet long 45-foot 
apron. Berth six 500-foot general cargo ships and 
one petroleum tanker. Depth 35 feet at mean low 
water. 

BARGE TERMINAL: Four 300-foot berths complet- 
ed 1968. 

TRANSIT SHEDS: Three total 220,000 square feet. 
Two of steel, concrete and masonry, one of metal. 
All sprinklered with deluge systems. 

WAREHOUSES: Seven storage warehouses, totaling 
588,000 square feet, sprinklered with deluge sys- 
tems. Total 30 fire segregation sections. Bonded 
warehouse spaee available. 

OPEN STORAGE: 13 acres of paved open storage. 

SCALES: Certified public truck scales available on 
terminal. 

TRACKAGE: Double marginal tracks with crossover, 
full length of wharf. Single depressed track full 
length rear of transit sheds and warehouses. Sou- 
thern Railway freight car storage yard adjacent to 
port property. 

CARGO HANDLING EQUIPMENT: Fork lifts with 
detachable accessories such as paper and bale 
clamps, etc. Facilities for full palletization cargoes. 

1 Tractors and trailers. 
?TT 



HEAVY EQUIPMENT: Berths and 7 have two 75- 
ton gantry cranes with full crane services including 
buckets, electromagnet, etc. Cranes ma) be used in 
tandem with 150 ton capacity. 

U. S. CUSTOMS: A designated customs port of entry 
with permanent personnel assigned. 

BULK FACILITY: 3,000,000-ton annual capacity 

bulk facility for receipt, conveyance, storage and 
shipment of bulk cargoes. Loading capacity of 
3,000 tons per hour. Storage capacity 106,000 tons. 

LOADING OB UNLOADING: Truck and rail docks 
for loading or unloading at transit sheds and ware- 
houses; easy access into transit sheds and ware- 
houses. 

FUMIGATION: Latest, largest and fastest vacuum 
cvanide and acritet fumigation facilities. Two 0.000 
cubic foot steel chambers, full mechanized. 

SERVICES: Served by the Southern-A c\ EC Bail- 
wax System and the Beaufort-Morehead Railroad 

plus numerous highway motor carriers. 

SHIP-SIDE INDUSTRIAL SITES AVAILABLE. 
SECURITY: Security force on duty at all times. 




MYERS AND TEXAS 
GULF SULFUR 



Greensboro. X. C. — The world was the market- 
place for his career as a salesman, but A. Nelson 
Myers has come home to North Carolina to enjoy 
retirement. 

As senior vice president of marketing for Texas 
Gulf Sulphur Company. Myers has been based in 
New York City since 1946. but his responsibilities 
for sales of TGS products, including fertilizer 
materials, have taken him around the globe. He 
retired January 1 to Greensboro, his boyhood 
hometown. 

Myers* success in the world of big business 
failed to temper his southern manner. A co-worker 
said. "Nelson will be missed. He has never lost 
that fine, easy southern temperament. He has 
always been accessible to everyone." 

Another close associate said. "He's a wonderful 
balance wheel, always has been. He has that great 
trait of giving authority and responsibility to 
people who work for him and letting them work 
out the problems." 




Born in Williamson. West Virginia, Myers was 
six when his family moved to Greensboro. He 
spent his boyhood there and was graduated in 
1929 from Davidson College, some 90-miles away. 
He is the eldest son of Rev. Charles F. Myers, a 
prominent Presbyterian minister. 

Many of his early working years were also 
spent in North Carolina, in Wilmington and Greens- 
boro, in addition to Richmond. Va.. Nashville. 
Tenn. and Columbia. S. C. 

Myers has been a Texas Gulf vice president 
since 1959, first heading sales and then running 
overall marketing beginning in 1964. He had been 
a New Yorker for six years and was a vice presi- 
dent for another large chemical sales corporation 
when he joined Texas Gulf Sulphur. 

Throughout the years, Myers has visited "back 
home" in North Carolina as often as a busy sched- 
ule would permit. His brother. Charles F. Myers, 
Jr., Chairman of the Board of Burlington Indus- 
tries, is a Greensboro resident. His daughter. Mary 
Myers. is a nurse for the Guilford County Public 
Health Service and also lives in Greensboro. A 
second daughter. Mrs. Kenan 
sides in Princeton. New Jerse\ 
L. B. Schenck. is a Davidson, 

"North Carolina has a wonderful reputation 
throughout the United States and abroad." said 
Myers. "It's rare when countries where we sell 
our products don't know something about North 
Carolina and look upon it as a progressive state." 



Van Yranken. re- 
and a sister. Mrs. 
N. C. citizen. 



A. Nelson Myers, left, senior vice 
president for marketing' of Texas Gulf 
Sulphur Company, discusses shipping 
of fertilizer materials from North 
Carolina to world wide markets with 
Dr. Guy T. McBride. Jr.. vice president 
and general manager of the TGS phos- 
phate division at Aurora. X. C. Myers' 
retirement after 24 years with the 
firm is effective January 1, 1970. He 
will reside in Greensboro. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



BEAUFORT-MOREHEAD RAILROAD 

Serves Radio Island 

and the Deepwater Port, Nearest to the 

Open Sea 
IN MID-AMERICA 



Look at this Photo . 




N. C. Ports Authority General Cargo Terminal and Phosphate Complex 




Beaufort Harbor at Morehead City 
Radio Island 



Land Lease Arrangements 
Tank and Liquid 

Import-Export Terminal Leases 
Construction for all types of Liquid 

Ocean Shipping, Planning and 

Financing Available 
Located within 500 miles of 50% 

of the population of the United States 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE PORTS 



Write or Call 

A. T. LEARY JR. 

16 Broad Street 

Beaufort, North Carolina 28516 

Telephone: (919) 728-2131 






WOODBURY 
INSURANCE AGENCY 

Agents ajstd Brokers 

OCEAN MARINE INSURANCE 

• Ocean Cargo 

• Tailor Made Forms 

• Dockside Claims Facilities 

• Personal Service 

CABLE: WOODBURYINS 



Louie E. Woodbury, Jr.. Pres. 
Louie E. Woodbury, III Vice Pres. 
Eugene B. Woodbury Vice Pres. 



500 WACHOVIA BUILDING 
WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 28401 



TELEPHONE 
(919) 763-5186 



CARTERET COUNTY 

NORTH CAROLINA 




\tya»e/S«. a ^ 0ty 



Industrial Division 
Carteret County Chamber of Commerce 

OCEAN GATEWAY TO THE: 

PHOSPHATE CHEMICALS, INDUSTRIAL PHOSPHATE 

FIELD, CHEMICAL COMPLEX 

■ All Weather Deep Water Port, 
Morehead City. 

■ Inland Waterway Routes. 
■ Industrial Sites on Both. 

■ Fast Freight, Rail or Truck. 

■ Beautiful Vacation Area, 
Atlantic Beach. 

■ Closest Port, Direct Water 
Connection, to Phosphate 
Production Area in N. C. 

P W Bullock, Chamber of Commerce 
MOREHEAD CITY, N. C. 



waters shipping co. 

F.M.C. No. 70 

OFFICE: N. C. STATE DOCKS 

Serving Wilmington & Morehead City 

INTERNATIONAL FREIGHT FORWARDER 

CUSTOMS BROKER 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

P. O. BOX 118 • PHONE AREA CODE 919 — 763-8491 

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA 

Teletype — 5 1 — 937-03 1 2 



FM.C. No. 498 

The Hipage Company, Inc. 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
FOREIGN FREIGHT FORWARDERS 

Douglas Municipal Airport 
P. 0. Box 27143 — Tel. Area Code 704 — 392-3171 

Charlotte. N. C. 28208 
Citizens Bank Bldg. Richmond, Va. 

Norfolk, Virginia Travelers Bldg. 



Newport News, Va. 
P Box 123 



Alexandria, Va. 
P. 0. Box 550 



Member Nationol Customs Brokers & Forwarders Assn 
of America, Inc. 



Morehead City 
Shipping Company 



^uA^mUi 



SStm 



STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

& 

STEVEDORES 



300 Arendell Street 



Morehead City, North Carolina 



P. O. Drawer 39 Cable Address 

Phone 726-6151 MORSHIPCO 

TWX No. 510-924-2905 
Branch Office: Charlotte, N. C. 



Serving MOREHEAD CITY 
and serving it well! 



The 10,200-mile Southern Railway System 
connects Morehead City with major population 
centers in the South and with all traffic gate- 
ways to the rest of the country. 

Southern innovations in equipment and 
service are designed to meet specific shipper 
needs with a dependable, one-management 



transportation network that can save you time, 

money and trouble. 

On your next import or export shipment, 
ship Southern—and see! Contact 
the men in our Sales Office at 
New Bern, N. C, P.O. Box 909, 
or telephone (919) ME 7-6877. 




flEB BED 



¥ 



rwlH*^ 



2* 



**** 



M* 



•s^***' -»?»**,. 



■■>*- ** 









l ~ 'I 


~ 


1 F 










[—} 




L 


• 


j 










1 I 




N. C. STATE PORTS AUTHORITY 
Raleigh, N. C. 
10 E. Jones St. 



we were 



IUU RATE 

U S Po,..,. 

PAID 



AJ 



A 



here 9 years before 

anyone 

whistled "Dixie" 



S} 



o 



>~ 
ceo 

x: 



Dan D. Emmett composed "Dixie" in 
1859. Our company was founded in 

850 

And we've been making friends in the 
maritime business ever since. 
Today, Luckenbach serves the shipping 
industry through a network of marine 
terminals, stevedoring companies, and 
agencies throughout the south. 

Luckenbach 

Steamship Company, Inc. 
120 Wall Street 
New York, N. Y. 10004 




Luckenbach Philadelphia • Heide Company Wilmington, Morehead City; North Carolina * 
Caldwell Company Jacksonville • Shaw Company Cape Canaveral, Port Everglades, Miami, West Palm Beach • Luckenbach Tampa 



STATE LIBRARY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



3 3091 00748 3142